Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31

Thread: Who misses their old job?

  1. #11
    I do not miss the politics in my job or the occasional firehall dramas.
    But yes I miss the hell out of both of my jobs.
    I was an EMT. It took me about a year or longer to hear a siren and be able to control my flight reflex. It still feels horrible when I see a wreck on the side of the road and I am useless and have to be one of the rubberneckers driving on by. I still feel sad when I see them going by somewhere running emergency traffic. The smallest one, I was always shoved through a window to get to the patient during an extrication. I do not miss the extremely hot days and being stuck under a tarp with a patient in full gear listening to the equipment grinding away and the glass breaking. Actually I do miss every second of that. I definitely miss being up in the middle of it and being able to calm someone and be with them. I miss 24 hour shifts and 48 off, the occasional night of no calls and knowing I slept through the night and got paid to do it.

    My second job was a mail carrier. I miss that too, knowing the backroads and waving to the people working in their yard. Visiting with some of the friendly dogs. I always wonder what happened to the stray one I used to save my leftovers from lunch for. I almost had him tame enough to rescue. I was the Saturday carrier in a really rural town. Losing that job was hard, but it didn't leave nearly as big of a hole in my chest as losing being an EMT. It was only this past year I let my license expire
    If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


    Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Van Quad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,558
    I was a legal land surveyor. I'd just been 'promoted' to a desk job, doing computations and sending out work crews. It kept me out of the snow but was really stressful.

    Some of us miss our old jobs more than we miss our old girlfriends. We tend to define ourselves by our jobs; I think that's why we work so hard post-injury to get back to work. One of my postinjury careers was doing digital mapping using a trackball. It nearly destroyed my shoulder.

  3. #13
    Junior Member Firefly_Aviator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Little Rock, Arkansas
    Posts
    10
    Tomorrow I'm turning in my official retirement as a firefighter. I've been a fireman since I was 17 years old. It's all I've ever known and it's a part of my identity. Now I have to let it go. I fought for over a year to get strong enough to go back.. but its just not going to happen. I'm walking much better, but stairs are really tough. I showed them a video of me carrying a 50 pound weighted pack and doing stairs and they were really proud of me. But the part of the video i didn't show, was that I could only do one flight of stairs without really struggling. Some days I can't climb stairs at all. Pretty important stuff to be a fireman. I love this job too much to try and fake and go back to work. I'm afraid I would injure someone or couldnt help them if they needed me. I just wish they could have put me in the training department or something. I'm reallllllly going to miss the whole lifestyle. :-(
    L-1 Burst fx 8.11.2010
    Can walk with effort short distances
    bowel and bladder blues

  4. #14
    It's a shame they can't put you in training or some other position Josh. You gave it your best.

  5. #15
    There was nowhere in EMS or FF for me anymore either. I taught some classes, but even that was hard and not the same. Dispatching just frustrated me and the hours were horrible.
    If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


    Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

  6. #16
    My situation is the opposite, my sci gave me the opportunity to leave a field I had come to dislike and get into work that was rewarding for 30 years. I was the youngest bulk oil storage terminal mgr for Amerada Hess Corp in 1970. My terminal had a ship dock, chemical mixing facility, truck terminal and railroad siding in addition to many acres of huge storage tanks full of crude oil, gasoline, etc. and a jungle of pipelines feeding everything. I had to supervise a union workforce of maybe 30. While still in rehab post injury, a company VP offered me the opportunity to become his admin asst at the central office. I declined and left their employment, took advantage of a federal grant then available to get a masters in rehab counseling. Between SSDI and the grant my costs at NYU were paid for.

    Rehab and acute hospitalization (back then a combined total of 9 months) opened my eyes to other possibilities. Knowing I was going to be living with this disability, I did not feel like spending my life trying to improve the bottom line for Amerada Hess. I felt more empathy for my fellow sci patients than I had ever experienced in my life - I was discharged in Feb started my masters program in Sept and worked in the rehab field for 30 years after. I was always happy with this choice and feel I made a difference, never once did I look back and miss the good old days with the oil company.

  7. #17
    I do not miss working, but I sure miss being able to work.

  8. #18
    I just asked my husband the other day if he ever thought he would miss his job.
    He was a medical gas pipe fitter and did construction HVAC and also had been a wrench turner many years. He and his brother had a small side business installing furnaces and A/C units.
    He worked out of town sometimes and often outdoors in the extreme weather out part of our country.
    He was a foreman which could be a headache and had 2 shoulder surgeries from work related injuries.
    He said he never thought he would miss it, but he does.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Van Quad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,558
    Great story. Most of us try to leverage the knowledge/experience that we acquired in our previous career. But SCI gives you a chance for an entire occupational makeover. In my observations, accounting seems to provide SCI survivors with the most financially rewarding careers. But you (ancientgimp) found an even more rewarding career.


    Quote Originally Posted by ancientgimp View Post
    My situation is the opposite, my sci gave me the opportunity to leave a field I had come to dislike and get into work that was rewarding for 30 years. I was the youngest bulk oil storage terminal mgr for Amerada Hess Corp in 1970. My terminal had a ship dock, chemical mixing facility, truck terminal and railroad siding in addition to many acres of huge storage tanks full of crude oil, gasoline, etc. and a jungle of pipelines feeding everything. I had to supervise a union workforce of maybe 30. While still in rehab post injury, a company VP offered me the opportunity to become his admin asst at the central office. I declined and left their employment, took advantage of a federal grant then available to get a masters in rehab counseling. Between SSDI and the grant my costs at NYU were paid for.

    Rehab and acute hospitalization (back then a combined total of 9 months) opened my eyes to other possibilities. Knowing I was going to be living with this disability, I did not feel like spending my life trying to improve the bottom line for Amerada Hess. I felt more empathy for my fellow sci patients than I had ever experienced in my life - I was discharged in Feb started my masters program in Sept and worked in the rehab field for 30 years after. I was always happy with this choice and feel I made a difference, never once did I look back and miss the good old days with the oil company.

  10. #20
    I am angry because I hated my desk job after getting a degree in finance. Found my dream job and bam got reverted back to a desk. :/ life...
    If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


    Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-09-2010, 08:02 PM
  2. Bladder Near Misses
    By sjean423 in forum Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-19-2006, 09:17 PM
  3. Rutgers misses the Final Four - Arggh
    By Wise Young in forum Recreation, Sports, Travel, & Hobbies
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-02-2005, 06:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •