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Thread: RT-600 RTI-600 (FES) Stepper Standing FES Restorative Therapies, Inc

  1. #1
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    RT-600 RTI-600 (FES) Stepper Standing FES Restorative Therapies, Inc








    Has anyone seen this?
    Used it?
    Any idea on Cost?
    Can you get up onto it unassisted?

    RT600 FES step and stand rehabilitation therapy system

    A little video of the device..
    http://www.restorative-therapies.com/rt600


    http://www.prweb.com/releases/2011/5/prweb8481921.htm
    Restorative Therapies, Inc., Today Announced a Rehabilitation Breakthrough, the RT600 Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Stepper

    Designer of medical devices providing clinic and in-home restoration therapy unveils the next in the series of FES powered physical therapy systems that started with the successful RT300 FES cycle.

    Patient steps on the RT600[/COLOR]


    The RT600 is the first therapy system to bring the established benefits of FES to weight supported stepping for people with neurological impairments


    Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) May 31, 2011
    Restorative Therapies, Inc., advances its new era in

    systems for neurological injury and paralysis with FDA clearance of the world’s first Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)

    therapy system for stepping and standing.
    FES is a physical therapy rehabilitation modality used to evoke physical activity and exercise not otherwise possible for individuals with a neurological impairment such as a spinal cord injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy. The new RT600 system delivers electrical currents to stimulate nerves which activate core and leg muscles including the quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteals, gastroc, anterior tibialis, abdominals and erector spinae to evoke stepping and standing activity. This rehabilitation enables a patient’s paralyzed or weak legs to move through patterned physical activity utilizing their own muscles while safely positioned in a partial body weight supporting harness.
    “The RT600 is the first physical therapy system to bring the established benefits of FES to weight supported stepping for people with neurological impairments" said Prof. David Ditor of Brock University, in Ontario, Canada.
    "It is the first truly practical rehabilitation system of this kind that I have seen. In addition to combining several valuable neuro-rehabilitation interventions, functional electrical stimulation, locomotor gait training and neuromuscular re-education, the RT600 is small and easy enough to use that I can one day envision it in the patient’s home,” said Cristina Sadowsky of the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland.
    “In the context of rehabilitation influencing neural plasticity as a means for neural restoration, training in the home setting is an essential component of progress and I see the RT600 as a great tool in achieving this,” concludes Sadowsky.
    “The RT600 system utilizes all of the popular RT300 FES cycle’s great features including personalized muscle selection, dynamic motor support, secure Internet connectivity and physical therapy clinic ease of use.” says Andrew Barriskill, CEO of Restorative Therapies. “We are excited to be introducing this world first therapy to a large group of patients who currently have limited physical activity options.”
    RT600 FES for Stepping is the latest result of Restorative Therapies commitment to ongoing development of FES powered physical therapy systems designed to help people with neurological impairments maximize their recovery potential.
    The RT600 is now also available in Europe, Canada and Australia.
    About Restorative Therapies, Inc.
    Restorative Therapies (http://www.restorative-therapies.com), is a privately held company headquartered in Baltimore, Md., whose mission is to help people with a neurological impairment achieve their full recovery potential. Restorative Therapies is one of the first companies to target activity-based physical therapy and FES as a rehabilitation therapy for immobility associated with paralysis such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury.

  2. #2
    Senior Member tarheelandy's Avatar
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    I talked with Tony at RTI about it recently. He says they are getting a lot of positive comments about it from the facilities that have purchased it. It is meant to be a personal replacement for the locomotor. This is something that you can have in your home instead of going to a rehab and having multiple therapists move your legs for you. I asked how much it cost but he says he is a tech and doesn't know the cost. He did ask if I would put in a good word for it to James Shepherd, and I did. If they do get one, I would love to try it out!

  3. #3
    I saw it in use during a recent visit to Craig Hospital. It's definitely expensive. I think I heard that it will probably be around $60,000, but don't take my word for that. I don't think it will be meant for personal purchase in your home gym. You definitely cannot use it on your own. I believe it will take 2 people to get you up on it. Even if you're a para, you need someone to roll the light gate over the locomotor.

    My advice is that you find someplace nearby that does spinal cord injury rehab and has one of these. Since they're so new, I'm sure that's not possible yet. If they aren't already looking into getting one, you could try to convince them to get one!

  4. #4

    Video of Real Users On RT600 Step and Stand

    http://youtu.be/jrW8JxBa5WA

    Above is a link to a youtube video of myself and different people at my therapy center (http://www.coreflorida.com/) in Florida using the new RT600. It's pretty cool and I like the way it actually makes me feel breathless. I've heard they want to make it available for in-home use, but I definitely could never strap myself in and hook up without help. CORE usually has 2 trainers set me up. I personally started out going around 3-4 miles, but I'm up to around 7 or 8 now in only a few weeks.

  5. #5
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    Thank you for sharing.
    Looks excellent.

    Do you have any experience of the RTI 300 stim bike? how does it compare?
    I could drive the bike with just the stim once the motor had me going, wondering
    if the same is possible here.

    Is there any chance you could shoot some video of the process involved in hooking a client up to the machine. As they roll up in their wheelchair all the way through to walking on the machine.


    Quote Originally Posted by FLgirl View Post
    http://youtu.be/jrW8JxBa5WA

    Above is a link to a youtube video of myself and different people at my therapy center (http://www.coreflorida.com/) in Florida using the new RT600. It's pretty cool and I like the way it actually makes me feel breathless. I've heard they want to make it available for in-home use, but I definitely could never strap myself in and hook up without help. CORE usually has 2 trainers set me up. I personally started out going around 3-4 miles, but I'm up to around 7 or 8 now in only a few weeks.

  6. #6
    Yes, I also do the RT300 1-2 times/week and I'm also doing at least 4 miles a session with no motor. The big difference is the RT600 is much more intense and really feels like a cardio workout. I mean, I'm really out of breath at the end of the 600 session. Plus, I get the added benefit of load bearing and upright gait training.

    And, I asked my trainer about the possibility of using the RT600 with only stim and no motor. He said the 300 and the 600 work off of different principles. The RT300 measures speed and resistance, but the RT600 measures weight bearing capacity. The amount of stim you need on the 300 is based on how well your body is able to maintain the set resistance and speed and that determines whether the motor comes on or off, but the goal on the 600 is to gradually increase your weight bearing percentage. (If you think about it, even on a regular treadmill or elliptical you have motor assistance.)

    For example, on the 600 my stimulated muscles are able to maintain 20% body weight and stay under 100% stim. My goal is to achieve 100% of my body weight with minimal stim.

    I'm scheduled for a RT600 session tomorrow and I'll have my trainers film the set up and get it on here asap so you can see why I say it takes assistance.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLgirl View Post
    Yes, I also do the RT300 1-2 times/week and I'm also doing at least 4 miles a session with no motor. The big difference is the RT600 is much more intense and really feels like a cardio workout. I mean, I'm really out of breath at the end of the 600 session. Plus, I get the added benefit of load bearing and upright gait training.

    And, I asked my trainer about the possibility of using the RT600 with only stim and no motor. He said the 300 and the 600 work off of different principles. The RT300 measures speed and resistance, but the RT600 measures weight bearing capacity. The amount of stim you need on the 300 is based on how well your body is able to maintain the set resistance and speed and that determines whether the motor comes on or off, but the goal on the 600 is to gradually increase your weight bearing percentage. (If you think about it, even on a regular treadmill or elliptical you have motor assistance.)

    For example, on the 600 my stimulated muscles are able to maintain 20% body weight and stay under 100% stim. My goal is to achieve 100% of my body weight with minimal stim.

    I'm scheduled for a RT600 session tomorrow and I'll have my trainers film the set up and get it on here asap so you can see why I say it takes assistance.
    Thank You for your responses. Is there any way you can lock out your knees using this machine or do they have to stay bent?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Domosoyo's Avatar
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    Cool, FLgirl would love to see your video. The place my daughter goes to just got this and I haven't seen anyone use it yet bu they JUST got it. We'll be there tomorrow so maybe we will see someone up on it.

    What level injuries is this contraption for?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by nrf View Post
    Is there any way you can lock out your knees using this machine or do they have to stay bent?
    This is the question i have. i dont see how you can ever acheive a high level of weight bearing if your knees arent locked out. from the videos it appears as though the legs are swinging front to back as opposed to "stepping" and the harness is just holding the body up - seems pretty far from true locomotor training (i.e. through the NRN certified centers) which mimics a normal walking pattern

  10. #10
    Yes, it is possible to lock out your legs. As a high quad, 11 years post (C6) my lower body muscle mass must increase to accomplish that. Either way just because you’re not locking out your legs doesn’t mean you aren’t supporting your body weight. I mean, an able body person who stands with their knees bent is still supporting 100% of their weight…
    The difference is with the RT600 your muscles are activating and they are holding up your body weight vs. your joints and skeletal system taking the impact and holding up your body weight with the locomotor training you're referring to. Unless you have function in your lower limbs, your muscles aren't being activated that way.
    If you look closely in the video, you may be able to see the plantar and dorsi flexion on the RT600 does very closely replicate a stepping pattern. It's obviously not like the walking pattern that we get when my trainers have me on the LiteGait Treadmill system, but it is very similar to an elliptical. The main benefit still is that the FES is activating my muscles, allowing ME to do some of the work instead of the trainer. However, I will never say that traditional locomotor training is not also beneficial and crucial to recovery or that the RT600 should replace locomotor training. I believe they complement each other.
    My trainers did film my set-up today and are taking the video home to work on adding some additional explanations so you all can see what they’re doing and why. I’ll get it up asap.
    I hope I’m answering all of your questions! This is all new to me too, so I’m learning right along with you guys!

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