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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #51
    Interview: Susan Harkema, PhD, research director
    Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center
    Louisville, KY




    If there’s a Holy Grail in spinal cord research, it's the goal of getting paralyzed patients back up and walking.

    Our first guest has published research that explains how she used an electrical stimulator implanted in the back of a paralyzed man.

    So far, he’s been able to stand for short periods and take a few steps on his own. See below for a link to videos documenting the patient's recovery.

    read....

    http://soundmedicine.iu.edu/segment/...njury-Research

  2. #52
    I don't remember this article, have you seen this one?




    American team seeks partners in health care


    By MD RASOOLDEEN | ARAB NEWS

    Published: Feb 26, 2011 23:09 Updated: Feb 26, 2011 23:14

    RIYADH: A US medical team visited the Kingdom last week to seek partners to conduct cooperative programs on injuries relating to the spinal cord and the brain.

    “We came to Saudi Arabia to carry out a partnership program in research, treatment and education on spinal cord and brain trauma injuries considering the current medical needs of the Kingdom in the particular field," said Dr. Barth A. Green, professor and chairman of Neurological Surgery at the University of Miami.

    Green, who led a medical team from the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, met with the key officials of leading hospitals in the Kingdom during his three-day tour to the capital.

    “The Kingdom has recorded the highest number of brain and trauma injuries in the world,” said Green, adding that the main cause of the high incidence in the Kingdom is solely due to traffic accidents.

    He also said that studies had shown that brain injury caused to newborn babies could also be prevented by lowering the infant’s body temperature within 24 hours of delivery. “Lowering the body temperature following cardiac arrest increases the chance of survival among patients who have undergone heart attacks,” he said.

    He said the world spends some $50 billion on spinal cord injuries and the expenditure is manifold on brain injuries. Green also described the increasing incidence as a socioeconomic burden.

    In 1985, Green founded The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. Today, The project is the world’s most comprehensive spinal cord injury research center, housed in the Lois Pope LIFE Center, a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.


    read...

    http://arabnews.com/saudiarabia/article287100.ece

  3. #53
    I dunno, reading this the Miami Project is even talking more about acute injuries......

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Paddon View Post
    I dunno, reading this the Miami Project is even talking more about acute injuries......
    Nearly the same identical publicity article was posted by Arab News back in February. http://arabnews.com/saudiarabia/article287100.ece
    Published: Feb 26, 2011 23:09 Updated: Feb 26, 2011 23:14
    Even the same picture was used... The premise is to educate future students in a specific field.
    Not really an acute/chronic issue. This was discussed in several threads last winter.
    (lather, rinse, repeat)
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 07-23-2011 at 06:43 PM.

  5. #55
    Progress in Treatments of Spinal Cord Injury: Injection of Stem Cells and Peptides

    WHD: Some research on Spinal Cord Injury repair and regeneration is exciting, but in order to better understanding where the new projects are going, it helps to have a good general view. the NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke) has an excellent page about SCI on their site [1]

    Quoting the site, here are the main research domains

    continue...

    http://www.wheelchairhealth.net/?p=1024

  6. #56
    Fawcett Lab: Spinal Cord Plasticity and Repair

    James Fawcett
    James Fawcett runs one of the six labs that form the Reeve Foundation International Research Consortium on Spinal Cord Injury. His lab is located at Addenbrooke’s Hospital at the University of Cambridge, in England, and is part of the Center for Brain Repair, an institute formed in 1995 and funded by the British Medical Research Council.

    Dr. Fawcett started his career as a doctor, working in the autoimmune disease area, including very tough conditions such as systemic lupus. "One of the things about being a doctor, you eventually become competent at what you are doing. For some people, that's great. Others might feel, 'what's new? I don’t want to do this for 40 years.' I decided I wanted to start doing research." One of Fawcett's options was to stay in the area of autoimmune diseases. "It's is an interesting field and would have been an easy move but at the time, the basic immunology science was not in place to ask sensible questions about how to address autoimmune problems. Indeed, nothing much happened in that field until the immunology caught up with it just five or six years ago."

    Fawcett had an undergraduate interest in nervous system development and followed that toward a Ph.D.; he then had the choice: clinic or lab. "I enjoyed the science so much I decided to do that. But having been a doctor, one is always thinking about treating patients in the end. I felt that if we can understand how the body first makes a brain and nervous system, maybe we can understand how to fix it. It was a no-brainer to go into neuroregeneration."


    Dr. Fawcett went to work on one of the central issues in spinal cord science: the environment of the spinal cord is inhibitory to axon regeneration. "So the first experiment I did was to look at the different sorts of glia [support cells in the nervous system] to see which ones were inhibitory. My first paper was on oligodendrocytes, the next one was on astrocytes. I discovered that Martin Schwab [an original member of the Reeve Consortium whose lab is in Zurich] was well away with the oligodendrocyte story [having discovered the inhibitory substance Nogo] so I decided to stick with astrocytes and the glial scar."

    In about 1990 Dr. Fawcett set out to show that astrocytes in the glial scar could block regeneration. “That wasn’t straight forward so we had to develop a sort of three-dimensional tissue culture model. The next step was to demonstrate that inhibitory molecules were found in the extracellular matrix [the molecules that surround living cells, offering support and cohesion]. We were able to identify these as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. These are the inhibitory molecules I’ve been working on pretty much since then."

    Dr. Fawcett's lab then showed that these proteoglycans could be digested with the enzyme chondroitinase. "By doing this we could remove the inhibition and thereby allow axons to regenerate in the spinal cord." At the time the field was aware of chondroitinase, which helps break down sugar in proteoglycans, but, says Dr. Fawcett, "It had not been appreciated for its role in removing inhibition."

    There was more to the enzyme than inhibition. 'To our surprise the axons recovered much faster and much better than they should have given the amount of regeneration we observed. At that point we realized that chondroitinase could also stimulate plasticity; indeed, we felt plasticity must be its main mode of action rather than regeneration."



    read....

    http://www.christopherreeve.org/site...and_Repair.htm

  7. #57

    Thumbs up Dont over work your mind my friend

    manouli

    Have a good day and your dilligent work is much appreciated
    GL

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by GL View Post
    manouli

    Have a good day and your dilligent work is much appreciated
    GL
    No chance to go back to the normal posting for manouli?
    Since many CC members have asked for that I wonder what is the reason for having just one tread for manouli's posts..
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    No chance to go back to the normal posting for manouli?
    Since many CC members have asked for that I wonder what is the reason for having just one tread for manouli's posts..

    I agree. This thread makes it impracticable to discuss any single artcle.
    This should be brought to the attention of another moderator.

  10. #60
    Senior Member KIM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    No chance to go back to the normal posting for manouli?
    Since many CC members have asked for that I wonder what is the reason for having just one tread for manouli's posts..
    Before was better we could develop each post separately.
    Good job Manouli.

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