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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #551
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    Yes, ABSOLUTELY we will keep you posted! Danny's injury is T9/10, incomplete (although I STILL don't understand that!). He fell from a roof in 2000 and had a punctured lung and a collapsed lung. Doctors have since told him that had his lower body not been without oxygen for 30+ hours while they were trying to save his life in surgery, that he would have walked out of there. One wonders . . . (sigh). We don't go until February 14th so I will post after that appointment.

  2. #552
    A cure for spinal cord injuries may be close
    Posted: Jan 30, 2013 2:50 PM PST Updated: Jan 30, 2013 3:15 PM PST
    By Leslie Toldo - bio | email

    FLINT (WJRT) -
    (01/30/31) - A cure for paralysis may be right inside your own body! What is really exciting is that researchers are using cells from inside a patient's body to try to cure paralysis. This new research path could impact many of the thousands of people who suffer traumatic spinal cord injuries every year.

    "Before I even hit the ground, I knew I was paralyzed," says Marc Bouniconti's of his final football play.

    The collision paralyzed him from the neck down. "Next thing I know, I went from the best shape of my life to fighting for my life in a split second."

    Now Bouniconti, the son of an NFL hall of famer, is fighting to walk again, and a new treatment could be his answer. For the first time, the FDA has approved a trial to evaluate the safety of Schwann cells. The cells are responsible for sending electrical signals throughout the nervous system.


    read...


    http://www.abc12.com/story/20875962/...s-may-be-close

  3. #553
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    A cure for spinal cord injuries may be close
    Posted: Jan 30, 2013 2:50 PM PST Updated: Jan 30, 2013 3:15 PM PST
    By Leslie Toldo - bio | email

    FLINT (WJRT) -
    (01/30/31) - A cure for paralysis may be right inside your own body! What is really exciting is that researchers are using cells from inside a patient's body to try to cure paralysis. This new research path could impact many of the thousands of people who suffer traumatic spinal cord injuries every year.

    "Before I even hit the ground, I knew I was paralyzed," says Marc Bouniconti's of his final football play.

    The collision paralyzed him from the neck down. "Next thing I know, I went from the best shape of my life to fighting for my life in a split second."

    Now Bouniconti, the son of an NFL hall of famer, is fighting to walk again, and a new treatment could be his answer. For the first time, the FDA has approved a trial to evaluate the safety of Schwann cells. The cells are responsible for sending electrical signals throughout the nervous system.


    read...


    http://www.abc12.com/story/20875962/...s-may-be-close
    manouli, you'd better not post it. Any mention of MP causes me vomiting reflex.

  4. #554
    Quote Originally Posted by kivi66 View Post
    manouli, you'd better not post it. Any mention of MP causes me vomiting reflex.
    lol I know what you mean, it's a pain.

  5. #555
    Vietnam hospital to use stem cells to treat spinal paralysis
    Last Updated: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 06:00:00


    A hospital in Hanoi said Sunday it expects to offer the first effective spinal paralysis treatment in the country using stem cell transplants.

    Dr. Nguyen Tien Quyet, director of Vietnam-Germany Friendship Hospital and a leading surgery facility in the country, said the hospitals starting this March will apply the transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells to treat paralysis.

    Quyet said the hospital receives between 800 and 900 spinal cord injury cases each year, including around 200 cases in which the spinal marrow is damaged due to broken vertebrae.

    Once the latter occurs, victims are relegated to vegetative lives, unable to control their bladders and intestines, he said.

    The procedure derives stem cells from adipose tissue of the patient’s abdomen and grows them before transplanting them back into the body to help the spinal marrow recover, Quyet said.

    read....

    http://www.thanhniennews.com/2010/Pa...ralysis-using-

  6. #556
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Vietnam hospital to use stem cells to treat spinal paralysis
    Last Updated: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 06:00:00


    A hospital in Hanoi said Sunday it expects to offer the first effective spinal paralysis treatment in the country using stem cell transplants.

    Dr. Nguyen Tien Quyet, director of Vietnam-Germany Friendship Hospital and a leading surgery facility in the country, said the hospitals starting this March will apply the transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells to treat paralysis.

    Quyet said the hospital receives between 800 and 900 spinal cord injury cases each year, including around 200 cases in which the spinal marrow is damaged due to broken vertebrae.

    Once the latter occurs, victims are relegated to vegetative lives, unable to control their bladders and intestines, he said.

    The procedure derives stem cells from adipose tissue of the patient’s abdomen and grows them before transplanting them back into the body to help the spinal marrow recover, Quyet said.

    read....

    http://www.thanhniennews.com/2010/Pa...ralysis-using-
    Inspectors want Hanoi hospital fined in waste-selling racket
    http://www.thanhniennews.com/healthy/?catid=8&newsid=31474

    Government inspectors who found that some staff at Hanoi’s Viet Duc Hospital have been selling untreated waste for years have recommended a fine for the hospital for its negligence.
    The Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources inspectors suggested a fine of VND20-30 million (US$1,200-1,850).
    On August 10, they discovered untreated waste from the hospital being loaded on vans to be sold to some local buyers for recycling for domestic use.
    None of the material - about one ton of injection needles, many still covered in blood, drug vials, and other items - had been sterilized.
    Dr. Nguyen Tien Quyet, director of Viet Duc Hospital, said Tuesday his hospital “did not have any policy of selling such lethal waste”.
    It only sold “treated and sterilized drug vials, bottles of transfusion liquids, and cartons”.
    He said the hospital had already dismissed Huong, a female contract employee in the Infection Control Department, where the waste is sifted for transport to the Industrial-Medical Waste Processing Plant.
    Huong was responsible for overseeing the loading of the waste into vans.
    Quyet said other employees involved in the racket would also be identified and penalized.
    Police and other agencies are investigating further to initiate criminal proceedings against those involved.
    They are also probing for similar rackets at other city hospitals.
    Tests showed that an untreated gram of medical waste could transmit 11 billion pathogens into the environment.
    According to the Environment Protection Bureau, Viet Duc has also been dumping sewerage in its neighborhood for years since it did not have processing facilities.
    The hospital claims it does not have the resources to install them and told inspectors it had asked the health ministry for funds. But it could not show them proof for making this request.
    Other major city hospitals like Bach Mai and Central Obstetrics too violated medical waste processing regulations and environmental safety rules, according to the inspectors.
    They plan to petition the ministry to provide funding for installation of waste and sewerage processing facilities at hospitals.
    Source: Nguoi Lao Dong, Sai Gon Giai Phong – Compiled by Tuong Nhi

  7. #557
    Reflex control could improve walking after incomplete spinal injuries
    February 5, 2013 in Neuroscience



    A training regimen to adjust the body's motor reflexes may help improve mobility for some people with incomplete spinal cord injuries, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health.

    During training, the participants were instructed to suppress a knee jerk-like reflex elicited by a small shock to the leg. Those who were able to calm hyperactive reflexes – a common effect of spinal cord injuries – saw improvements in their walking.

    The study was led by Aiko Thompson, Ph.D., and Jonathan Wolpaw, M.D., both of whom hold appointments at the New York state Department of Health and the State University of New York in Albany, and at Columbia University in New York City. The study took place at Helen Hayes Hospital in West Haverstraw, N. Y. It was funded in part by NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

    read...

    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-0...-injuries.html

  8. #558
    February 06, 2013 /24-7PressRelease/ --

    New Treatment Shows Promise for Those with Spinal Cord Injuries

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 200,000 people in the United States are currently living with a severe spinal cord injury (SCI). Experts estimate that an additional 12,000 to 20,000 people in the United States suffer an SCI each year. The cost of treating these injuries is significant: the average annual medical cost for someone with a spinal cord injury is anywhere from $15,000 to $30,000, depending on the severity of the injury.

    Spinal cord injuries are particularly devastating because they are permanent. Despite doctors' best efforts, there is little they can do to cure a damaged spinal cord. A new study published recently in The Journal of Neuroscience, however, indicates that an experimental drug offers some hope of restoring neurological function lost to an SCI.

    more...
    http://www.24-7pressrelease.com/pres...ies-328529.php

  9. #559
    How spinal cord-injured man was able to move robot arm with just his thought
    Washington, Sat, 09 Feb 2013

    Washington, Feb 9 (ANI): Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC have explained how an electrode array sitting on top of the brain enabled a 30-year-old paralyzed man to control the movement of a character on a computer screen in three dimensions with just his thoughts.

    It also enabled him to move a robot arm to touch a friend's hand for the first time in the seven years since he was injured in a motorcycle accident.

    With brain-computer interface (BCI) technology, the thoughts of Tim Hemmes, who sustained a spinal cord injury that left him unable to move his body below the shoulders, were interpreted by computer algorithms and translated into intended movement of a computer cursor and, later, a robot arm, lead investigator Wei Wang, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Pitt School of Medicine said.

    "When Tim reached out to high-five me with the robotic arm, we knew this technology had the potential to help people who cannot move their own arms achieve greater independence," Dr. Wang said. "It's very important that we continue this effort to fulfill the promise we saw that day."

    Six weeks before the implantation surgery, the team conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of Hemmes' brain while he watched videos of arm movement. They used that information to place a postage stamp-size electrocortigraphy (ECoG) grid of 28 recording electrodes on the surface of the brain region that fMRI showed controlled right arm and hand movement.

    more...

    http://www.newstrackindia.com/newsde...s-thought.html

  10. #560
    Senior Member CapnGimp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    First Oral Drug for Spinal Cord Injury Improves Movement in Mice
    Jan. 8, 2013 — An experimental oral drug given to mice after a spinal cord injury was effective at improving limb movement after the injury, a new study shows.

    The compound efficiently crossed the blood-brain barrier, did not increase pain and showed no toxic effects to the animals.

    "This is a first to have a drug that can be taken orally to produce functional improvement with no toxicity in a rodent model," said Sung Ok Yoon, associate professor of molecular & cellular biochemistry at Ohio State University and lead author of the study. "So far, in the spinal cord injury field with rodent models, effective treatments have included more than one therapy, often involving invasive means. Here, with a single agent, we were able to obtain functional improvement."

    read...

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0108201445.htm
    just saw this when ordering uro supplies from Allegro...
    http://www.allegromedical.com/blog/e...ries-2264.html

    hadn't went to their FB page til today

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