Page 53 of 104 FirstFirst ... 3434445464748495051525354555657585960616263103 ... LastLast
Results 521 to 530 of 1032

Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #521
    Scientists Describe The Genetic Signature Of A Vital Set Of Neurons
    Released: 11/29/2012 11:55 AM EST
    Source: NYU Langone Medical Center


    Newswise — Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have identified two genes involved in establishing the neuronal circuits required for breathing. They report their findings in a study published in the December issue of Nature Neuroscience. The discovery, featured on the journal’s cover, could help advance treatments for spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which gradually kill neurons that control the movement of muscles needed to breathe, move, and eat.

    continue....

    http://www.newswise.com/articles/sci...set-of-neurons

  2. #522
    Senior Member muskie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Port Jervis, NY
    Posts
    247
    I wish it was available on August 2, 2011
    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

  3. #523
    Imaging system 'key to spinal injury research'


    28 November 2012
    Extensive research into spinal injuries is being carried out at Cardiff University with the help of an imaging system. Experts at the institution are working to gain a better understanding of stem cells and how they can be used to offer new and innovative treatments to people who suffer back problems.

    Professor Bing Song is in charge of the project, which is being run by the Institute of Tissue Engineering and Repair at the university. He is currently two years into the five-year scheme, which should draw significant conclusions on the topic.

    The European Research Council has pumped €1.76 million (£ ) into the study and hopes to ascertain to what extent it can trigger the repair of spinal cord injuries by controlling the migration of neural stem cells, reports Scientist Live. In particular, researchers are looking at the minute electric fields and how these can be utilised to help navigate the stem cells to the part of the body that has been injured.

    read...

    http://www.seriousinjurylaw.co.uk/ne...y-research.php

  4. #524
    Genetic Signature Of A Vital Set Of Neurons Could Advance Treatments For Spinal Cord Injuries, ALS

    Main Category: Neurology / Neuroscience
    Also Included In: Respiratory / Asthma | Muscular Dystrophy / ALS
    Article Date: 03 Dec 2012

    Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have identified two genes involved in establishing the neuronal circuits required for breathing. They report their findings in a study published in the December issue of Nature Neuroscience. The discovery, featured on the journal's cover, could help advance treatments for spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which gradually kill neurons that control the movement of muscles needed to breathe, move, and eat.

    The study identifies a molecular code that distinguishes a group of muscle-controlling nerve cells collectively known as the phrenic motor column (PMC). These cells lie about halfway up the back of the neck, just above the fourth cervical vertebra, and are "probably the most important motor neurons in your body," says Jeremy Dasen, PhD, assistant professor of physiology and neuroscience and a member of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, who led the three-year study with Polyxeni Philippidou, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow.

    read....

    http://www.medilexicon.com/medicalne...?newsid=253433

  5. #525
    Paralyzed Rats Run Again: Could Method Help Humans?

    Paralyzed rats learned to walk, run and spring deftly over obstacles after they were put on a physical training regimen that included electrical and chemical stimulation of their broken spinal columns and a “robotic postural interface,” a new study reveals.

    The study, published Thursday in Science, suggests that for humans with spinal cord injury, the trick to regaining lost movement may lie not in regeneration of the severed spinal cord, but in inducing the brain and spinal cord to forge wholly new paths toward each other. The Swiss authors liken that process to the way that infants, their nervous systems incomplete and learning by experience, sync up their brains and limbs so they can progressively crawl, stand, walk and play.

    All told, 250,000 Americans live with spinal cord injury, and just over half -- 52% -- are paraplegic. Each year, 11,000 new injuries occur--overwhelming in young males.

    In this study, coaxing that neural reinvention along took four key components: a soup of neurotransmitters — serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine -- injected into the epidural space; a set of electrodes supplying a continuous flow of electrical energy near the site of the break in the spinal cord; a rehabilitation rig that supports the unsteady participant and initially forces movement of the legs; and a training course that is as real-world as possible.

    read...

    http://www.alphaonenow.org/story.php?news_id=4864

  6. #526
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Numurkah, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Paralyzed Rats Run Again: Could Method Help Humans?

    Paralyzed rats learned to walk, run and spring deftly over obstacles after they were put on a physical training regimen that included electrical and chemical stimulation of their broken spinal columns and a “robotic postural interface,” a new study reveals.

    The study, published Thursday in Science, suggests that for humans with spinal cord injury, the trick to regaining lost movement may lie not in regeneration of the severed spinal cord, but in inducing the brain and spinal cord to forge wholly new paths toward each other. The Swiss authors liken that process to the way that infants, their nervous systems incomplete and learning by experience, sync up their brains and limbs so they can progressively crawl, stand, walk and play.

    All told, 250,000 Americans live with spinal cord injury, and just over half -- 52% -- are paraplegic. Each year, 11,000 new injuries occur--overwhelming in young males.

    In this study, coaxing that neural reinvention along took four key components: a soup of neurotransmitters — serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine -- injected into the epidural space; a set of electrodes supplying a continuous flow of electrical energy near the site of the break in the spinal cord; a rehabilitation rig that supports the unsteady participant and initially forces movement of the legs; and a training course that is as real-world as possible.

    read...

    http://www.alphaonenow.org/story.php?news_id=4864
    phase 2 human trails in two years sound promising but the stem cell comment souhnd discouraging

  7. #527
    Zapping body and brain boosts movement in paralysed
    Updated 17:35 30 November 2012 by Jessica Hamzelou

    A single session of nerve stimulation has improved the movement of people with spinal cord injuries. Mimicking the passage of nerve signals by stimulating a muscle as well as the brain has boosted recovery and helped people to regain better control of their movements.

    Voluntary movement requires a signal from the brain, which is passed down the spinal cord and then to neurons in muscles. Damage to the spinal cord can interrupt this pathway, resulting in paralysis.

    To improve the control of movement in people with these injuries, Monica Perez and Karen Bunday at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania used electrical and magnetic stimulation to strengthen the connection between two nerves involved in voluntary movement of the index finger.

    READ....

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/...s-movement-in-

  8. #528
    Mount Sinai Unveils Exoskeleton That Allows Paralyzed Patients To Walk
    By ebindelglass | CBS Local - New York - 7 hrs ago


    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) - A new medical technology allowing patients with spinal cord injuries to walk again was unveiled at Mount Sinai Hospital today.

    WCBS 880′s Marla Diamond On The Story

    Download: diamond_exo1w_midday_121206.mp3


    It’s an exoskeleton and, for Robert Woo of Manhattan, the potential is nothing short of miraculous.

    It looks like a body brace with a remote control and gizmos at the knees that resemble shotguns. It has motors and the hips and knees that provide the power necessary for someone to stand and walk.

    “I can walk down the street. I can take my children to the park. I can stand up next to my wife and giver her a hug,” he said. Thursday.

    read...

    http://beta.local.yahoo.com/news-mou...ame=New%20York

  9. #529
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Mount Sinai Unveils Exoskeleton That Allows Paralyzed Patients To Walk
    By ebindelglass | CBS Local - New York - 7 hrs ago


    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) - A new medical technology allowing patients with spinal cord injuries to walk again was unveiled at Mount Sinai Hospital today.

    WCBS 880′s Marla Diamond On The Story

    Download: diamond_exo1w_midday_121206.mp3


    It’s an exoskeleton and, for Robert Woo of Manhattan, the potential is nothing short of miraculous.

    It looks like a body brace with a remote control and gizmos at the knees that resemble shotguns. It has motors and the hips and knees that provide the power necessary for someone to stand and walk.

    “I can walk down the street. I can take my children to the park. I can stand up next to my wife and giver her a hug,” he said. Thursday.

    read...

    http://beta.local.yahoo.com/news-mou...ame=New%20York
    At least 3 in the arena. Newest from Vanderbilt: http://research.vuse.vanderbilt.edu/..._orthosis.html

  10. #530
    good to know information for paras.


    Paraplegia and spinal cord injury


    In paraplegia and spinal cord injury, pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) will help these patients in supportive fashion. Obviously, PEMFs will not reverse the spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a very complex problem and it varies tremendously from person to person. From this perspective it is hard to generalize the benefits from one person to the next. In general, however, there may be benefits in improving motor function, pain, basic tissue health, spasticity, and bladder function. In Europe they are using PEMFs in cerebral palsy patients who often share similar features to spinal cord injuries, particularly with spasticity. The tissues below the level of the lesion are often unhealthy because of the lack of appropriate spinal cord nerve “trophic” or nutritional support.

    read...
    http://drpawluk.com/updates/parapleg...l-cord-injury/

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-14-2005, 09:16 AM
  2. New articles posted to Research Forums.
    By Wise Young in forum Cure
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-15-2004, 11:41 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-14-2004, 12:00 PM
  4. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-15-2003, 02:05 AM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-12-2002, 04:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •