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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #501
    Would you try something like this that you might improve?


    With a zap, injured rats walk better
    Applying electrical pulses deep in the brain improves speed and endurance
    By Tanya Lewis
    Web edition : Wednesday, October 17, 2012
    A+ A- Text Size


    Editor’s Note: Science News intern Tanya Lewis is attending the neuroscience meeting in New Orleans on a travel award from the Society for Neuroscience.

    NEW ORLEANS – Stimulating the brains of rats with spinal cord injury improves their ability to walk, researchers reported October 15 at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. The findings may suggest ways to treat spinal injuries in humans.

    more...

    http://www.sciencenews.org/view/gene...ts_walk_better

  2. #502
    I wish I knew the way to make them move faster. Everything is taking so long. At least they are doing it.



    StemCells, Inc. Adds Eliseo Salinas to Advise on Product Development Strategy for Its Proprietary Human Neural Stem Cells

    Experienced and Successful Senior Executive With Global CNS Drug Development Expertise
    October 18, 2012: 09:00 AM ET


    quote:

    StemCells has a broad and expanding clinical development program for its HuCNS-SC cells. The Company has ongoing Phase I/II clinical trials in chronic thoracic spinal cord injury and dry age-related macular degeneration, and is planning for a controlled Phase II study in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease. In addition, as contemplated by the recently announced awards by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the Company anticipates pursuing INDs for both cervical spinal cord injury and Alzheimer's disease over the next four years.

    read....

    http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/...e/10008862.htm

  3. #503
    Advanced exoskeleton 'may soon help paralysed walk'

    Washington, October 31 (ANI)

    A team of researchers has developed a powered exoskeleton that enables people with severe spinal cord injuries to stand, walk, sit and climb stairs.

    The exoskeleton is light weight, compact size and modular design promise to provide users with an unprecedented degree of independence.

    The Vanderbilt University's Center for Intelligent Mechatronics has several patents pending on the design and Parker Hannifin Corporation - a global leader in motion and control technologies - has signed an exclusive licensing agreement to develop a commercial version of the device, which it plans on introducing in 2014.

    Until recently "wearable robots" were the stuff of science fiction. In the last 10 years, however, advances in robotics, microelectronics, battery and electric motor technologies advanced to the point where it has become practical to develop exoskeletons to aid people with disabilities.

    In fact, two companies - Argo Medical Technologies Ltd. in Israel and Ekso Bionics in Berkeley, Calif. - have developed products of this type and are marketing them in the U.S.


    more...

    http://www.newkerala.com/news/newspl...ews-95347.html

  4. #504
    Nerve cells' repair work may help spinal injury healing

    Washington, Nov 2 (IANS)

    Here's hope for those suffering from spinal cord injuries and neurological disorders -- researchers have found a way to make injured nerve cells regenerate.

    A team led by Melissa Rolls, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State University, has found that a mutation in a single gene can entirely shut down the process by which axons -- parts of the nerve cell that send signals to other cells -- regrow themselves after being cut or damaged.

    "We are hopeful this discovery will open the door to new research related to spinal-cord and other neurological disorders in humans," said Rolls, according to the journal Cell.


    read...

    http://www.newkerala.com/news/newspl...ews-96483.html

  5. #505
    Discovery May Help Nerve Regeneration in Spinal Injury


    ScienceDaily (Nov. 6, 2012) — Scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Glasgow have
    uncovered a possible new method of enhancing nerve repair in the treatment of spinal cord injuries.

    It is known that scar tissue, which forms following spinal cord injury, creates an impenetrable barrier to nerve regeneration, leading to the irreversible paralysis associated with spinal injuries. Scientists at Liverpool and Glasgow have discovered that long-chain sugars, called heparan sulfates, play a significant role in the process of scar formation in cell models in the laboratory.

    read...
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1106191909.htm

    Sugar could hold key to treating paralysis victims, experts hope


    By NATALIE WALKER
    Published on Wednesday 7 November 2012 00:00


    A NEW method of treating spinal cord injuries with the potential to reduce paralysis in patients has been developed by scientists in Scotland.


    Researchers at Glasgow University and colleagues at the University of Liverpool believe the work could help develop treatments by using the body’s own natural resources.

    They were able to envisage the innovative treatments by studying sugar produced in the body. The experts used data from previous studies which showed that scar tissue which forms following spinal cord injury creates an impenetrable barrier to nerve regeneration.

    It is this that leads to the irreversible paralysis associated with spinal injuries in many patients – meaning if doctors can find ways to reverse it, paralysis could be slowed down or prevented.



    more...

    http://www.scotsman.com/news/health/...hope-1-2617707

  6. #506
    Nerve cells` repair work may help spinal injury healing
    Last Updated: Friday, November 02, 2012,15:25


    Washington: Here`s hope for those suffering from spinal cord injuries and neurological disorders -- researchers have found a way to make injured nerve cells regenerate.

    A team led by Melissa Rolls, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State University, has found that a mutation in a single gene can entirely shut down the process by which axons -- parts of the nerve cell that send signals to other cells -- regrow themselves after being cut or damaged.

    "We are hopeful this discovery will open the door to new research related to spinal-cord and other neurological disorders in humans," said Rolls, according to the journal Cell.

    Rolls explained that axons, which form long bundles jutting out from nerve cells (neurons), ideally survive throughout an animal`s lifetime. But neurons need to be resilient and, in the event of injury or simple wear and tear, some can repair damage by growing new axons.

    read...

    http://zeenews.india.com/news/health...ing_19462.html

  7. #507
    Promising Nerve Research With Stem Cells And Nanofibers
    Main Category: Neurology / Neuroscience
    Also Included In: Stem Cell Research
    Article Date: 09 Nov 2012 - 1:00 PST


    Every week in his clinic at the University of Michigan, neurologist Joseph Corey, M.D., Ph.D., treats patients whose nerves are dying or shrinking due to disease or injury.

    He sees the pain, the loss of ability and the other effects that nerve-destroying conditions cause - and wishes he could give patients more effective treatments than what's available, or regenerate their nerves. Then he heads to his research lab at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, where his team is working toward that exact goal.

    In new research published in several recent papers, Corey and his colleagues from the U-M Medical School, VAAAHS and the University of California, San Francisco report success in developing polymer nanofiber technologies for understanding how nerves form, why they don't reconnect after injury, and what can be done to prevent or slow damage.


    read...

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/252558.php

  8. #508

    Thumbs up

    Paralysis – the future of chronic spinal cord repair.


    13th November 2012


    Groundbreaking research into the treatment of spinal cord injury is moving ever closer to human clinical trials.

    Laboratory research has identified chondroitinase, a bacterial enzyme, as a treatment with the potential to prevent or reverse paralysis following a spinal cord injury.

    Spinal Research, the charity behind the groundbreaking findings, held a reception at King’s College London to showcase the developments.

    Chief Executive of Spinal Research, Jonathan Miall said the reception provided an opportunity for people to learn more about the work of the charity as it “draws ever closer to human clinical trials”.

    more...

    http://www.epolitix.com/latestnews/a...al-cord-repair

  9. #509
    Great post MANOULI! Yet another lab that shows great results in animal models! Human trials before 2013 would be great.

    "So far this project has produced fantastic results which have already exceeded initial expectations."

    Dr Jerry Silver meet Dr Elizabeth Bradbury and her colleague Dr Elizabeth Muir I think you three have something called chondroitinase in common.
    "I'm manic as hell-
    But I'm goin' strong-
    Left my meds on the sink again-
    My head will be racing by lunchtime"

    <----Scott Weiland---->

  10. #510
    Quote Originally Posted by ineedmyelin View Post
    Dr Jerry Silver meet Dr Elizabeth Bradbury and her colleague Dr Elizabeth Muir I think you three have something called chondroitinase in common.
    ????


    Chondroitinase Steering Group As a result of the success of the Muir and Fawcett project, Spinal Research is now entering a clinical development phase for this exciting therapeutic concept. It has brought together six leading figures in the field of chondroitinase research to formulate a detailed development plan outlining the essential criteria and milestones this new treatment must achieve in order to enter a ‘first in man’ study. The team will establish the target patient group, the best course of development, the most effective method of delivery and the quickest route to clinical trials. They will also look at budget requirements and how to sustain this ambitious programme through to safe application to those living with a spinal cord injury.

    The steering group will include:

    · Dr Elizabeth Bradbury – Kings College, London.
    · Professor Jerry Silver – Case Western Reserve University, USA.
    Dr Silver’s team have recently shown an 80-90% restoration of
    breathing in the laboratory using chondroitinase.
    · Professor James Fawcett – University of Cambridge, Centre for
    Brain Repair. Professor Fawcett was part of the team which first
    developed chondroitinase.
    · Dr Liz Muir – University of Cambridge.
    · Dr Joost Verhaagen – Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience,
    Netherlands. The team will use the viral vectors developed by Dr
    Verhaagen.
    · Professor Armin Curt – University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich.
    Professor Curt is a leading scientist in Europe and will help to lay
    the path for clinical trials.
    · Dr James Guest – Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, USA. Dr Guest
    has previous experience of applying for and conducting clinical trials
    in America.

    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy...hondroitinase/

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