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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #41
    When the tattooed wigger fellow suggested a manouli sticky, I said it was a terrible idea, as it would discourage discourse . I was right.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by rjg View Post
    When the tattooed wigger fellow suggested a manouli sticky, I said it was a terrible idea, as it would discourage discourse . I was right.
    Calling someone a tattooed wigger fellow should encourage discourse, but that's not about the issue of posting cure articles is it?
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 07-20-2011 at 09:05 PM.

  3. #43

    When Injured Muscles Mistakenly Grow Bones

    I never heard this before.




    July 20, 2011 | Research
    When Injured Muscles Mistakenly Grow Bones


    Researchers discover brain chemical that causes strange, serious complication

    By Marla Paul
    CHICAGO --- For hundreds of thousands of people, injuring a muscle through an accident like falling off a bike or having surgery can result in a strange and serious complication. Their muscles start growing bones.

    No one understood what caused the abnormal bone growth, so there was no treatment. But now, research from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania shows that a neuropeptide in the brain called Substance P appears to trigger the formation of the extraskeletal bone. Eliminating Substance P prevents the bone growth.

    The discovery -– in human and animal tissues -- offers a molecular target for drugs to potentially prevent and treat the abnormal bone growth, which is called heterotopic ossification.

    “Patients who have it become very uncomfortable, and there is no way to make it go away,” said Jack Kessler, M.D., chair of neurology at Northwestern’s Feinberg School, a neurologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the senior author of the paper, which was published in the Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. “This explains why it happens and gives us a way to develop a therapy to potentially treat it.”


    read...

    http://www.northwestern.edu/newscent...row-bones.html

  4. #44
    ReWalk to give local paralyzed people chance to walk again
    July 19, 2011

    By Carolyn Beeler
    Video by Annie Bydlon for NewsWorks


    Last Christmas, fans of the TV show 'Glee' were wowed when Artie, a paralyzed character, was able to walk with the help of a robotic exoskeleton. The show catapulted the ReWalk into the national spotlight, and this summer Philadelphia-area residents will be the first to use the device in therapy.

    The ReWalk was invented by an Israeli company, but its U.S. clinical trial has been run by Moss Rehab in Philadelphia. Jean Altomari, 32, is the final participant in that trial.

    'Closest thing I've done to walking'

    On a recent afternoon, Altomari walked down an empty hospital hallway at Moss Rehab, part of Albert Einstein Medical Center. She was strapped into the ReWalk, which looks like a pair of leg braces attached to a small backpack. A sensor in the pack measured the tilt of Altomari's torso. When she leaned forward with the help of a pair of crutches, a microprocessor sent signals to motors in the hip and knee joints. They bent and then extended her legs at each step.

    "It's frustrating because you don't just get to get up and do it," Altomari said. "For someone who had everything come easy to them, this is not easy to do."

    Altomari is still learning to use the device, so she moved slowly, with the help of aides. Her steps were awkward and halting, and she had to stop and re-start often when she fell out of rhythm. She was sweating in the hot hallway, but still smiling.

    "As odd as it sounds, it feels normal," Altomari said. "This is the closest thing I've done to walking since I got hurt."

    Two years ago, Altomari made headlines for delivering a baby in a car on I-95 while working as a Pennsylvania State Trooper. Just three months later, a car accident while she was on vacation broke her back, paralyzing her. Altomari had not taken a step in a year and a half when she was strapped into the ReWalk for the first time.



    http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/h...again&Itemid=1

  5. #45
    Manouli Thanks!

    Very interesting study. Substance P is a neurotransmitter related to the sensation of pain. Substance P has been implicated in various pain syndromes.

    Interesting thing is that when I played football and rugby I'd block and fend off tackles with my left arm as I held the ball with my right arm and ran. After continual bruisings and beatings my left bicep calcified and turned to bone. I was told it may be permanent, luckily it wasn't as it's the only arm & bicep I have now

    Always wondered what the deal was with that. My brothers would joke it was because I drank too much milk (I which I always secretly detested, because I love milk and was scared they were right).

    I love science!!!

    Chris


    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    I never heard this before.




    July 20, 2011 | Research
    When Injured Muscles Mistakenly Grow Bones


    Researchers discover brain chemical that causes strange, serious complication

    By Marla Paul
    CHICAGO --- For hundreds of thousands of people, injuring a muscle through an accident like falling off a bike or having surgery can result in a strange and serious complication. Their muscles start growing bones.

    No one understood what caused the abnormal bone growth, so there was no treatment. But now, research from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania shows that a neuropeptide in the brain called Substance P appears to trigger the formation of the extraskeletal bone. Eliminating Substance P prevents the bone growth.

    The discovery -– in human and animal tissues -- offers a molecular target for drugs to potentially prevent and treat the abnormal bone growth, which is called heterotopic ossification.

    “Patients who have it become very uncomfortable, and there is no way to make it go away,” said Jack Kessler, M.D., chair of neurology at Northwestern’s Feinberg School, a neurologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the senior author of the paper, which was published in the Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. “This explains why it happens and gives us a way to develop a therapy to potentially treat it.”


    read...

    http://www.northwestern.edu/newscent...row-bones.html

  6. #46
    Neuralstem Receives Russian Patent for Stem Cell Transplantation to Treat Neurodegenerative Conditions


    ROCKVILLE, Md., July 21, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Neuralstem, Inc. (NYSE Amex: CUR) announced that it has received a patent covering the transplantation of human neural cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions from the Russian Federation. The claims include methods of culturing the cells as well as treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease), spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, Huntington's disease and other conditions through cell transplantation. Neuralstem is currently sponsoring the world's first FDA-approved trial to treat ALS with its spinal cord stem cells and has applied to the FDA to initiate a stem cell trial in chronic spinal cord injury.

    continue...

    http://www.prnewswire.com/news-relea...125957793.html

  7. #47

    Chris Mason-Hale is back on his feet

    Home→ Collections →Sports
    Chris Mason-Hale is back on his feet
    Former Western Tech linebacker takes his first steps since a paralyzing spinal cord injury in 2008



    July 19, 2011|By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun
    In May, Chris Mason-Hale posted a photo on his Facebook page of himself standing during a break from therapy at the International Center for Spinal Cord Injury atKennedy Krieger Institute.

    Looking all of his 6 feet 4 with arms crossed and head slightly back, his body language and proud grin seemed to exude a so-you-thought-I'd-never-walk-again dare.

    After the former Western Tech linebacker suffered a paralyzing spinal cord injury in a scrimmage nearly three years ago, walking under even a little of his own power was never a certainty.

    But this spring, Mason-Hale took his first steps since the injury.

    "It felt great," he said. "I had to wait so long to do it, I was like, 'Let's do it again.' "

    more...

    http://articles.baltimoresun.com/201...yle-alan-lagon

  8. #48

    Promising Spinal Cord Injury Treatment, This Week on Sound Medicine

    Promising Spinal Cord Injury Treatment, This Week on Sound Medicine
    July 21, 2011



    INDIANAPOLIS -- This week on Sound Medicine, a University of Louisville researcher will discuss a breakthrough in spinal cord injury recovery. Other segments include a pediatrician who will weigh in on the controversial new Florida “gag” law on gun questions, and a Regenstrief researcher who addresses "over-warning" about side effects on drug labels. Plus, Barbara Lewis will talk with a physician suffering from anorexia. Sound Medicine airs July 24 and 26 on WFYI, 90.1 FM. The show airs on public radio stations in Indiana and across the country; for air-times, see the Sound Medicine website.
    Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Spinal cord injury researcher Susan Harkema, Ph.D, recently demonstrated how epidural electrical stimulation can return movement to paralyzed patients. Dr. Harkema will discuss her study and its implications for others paralyzed by spinal cord injuries. She directs rehabilitation research at the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center in Louisville.

    more...

    http://communications.medicine.iu.ed...-sound-medici/

  9. #49
    Stem cell therapy for treating dog’s spinal cord injury
    Chennai, July 7, (PTI):

    Veterinarians here have claimed a breakthrough in therapy for animals based on stem cells taken from patients, by treating a nine-month-old dog that had a spinal cord injury.



    read...

    http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...ting-dogs.html

  10. #50

    Inspiring trio talk the talk, walk the walk

    Inspiring trio talk the talk, walk the walk
    Marianne Betts
    From: Herald Sun
    June 07, 2011 12:00AM


    A NEVER-say-die attitude has enabled three young Victorians to walk again after breaking their necks in accidents.
    Rhiannon Tracey, 22, Josh Wood, 29, and Irwin Vale, 23, said doctors at first gave them no hope of walking again.

    Now they are leading a project they believe may help others overcome crippling spinal injury.

    They have licensing rights from Project Walk, a US-based spinal cord injury recovery centre, to establish a centre in Melbourne.

    They believe Project Walk, a non-profit organisation, has much to offer through its "open-minded" approach to intensive exercise-based recovery.

    They hope to raise $600,000 to $700,000 to open the centre within 18 months, Ms Tracey said.

    All patients would first complete treatment at the Royal Talbot Rehabilitation Centre.

    read...

    http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/mor...-1226070491393

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