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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #401
    Senior Member ColonusFan's Avatar
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    Janne Kouri

    Dear manouli,

    I was watching the ABC News tonight and saw the story of Janne Kouri. When I did a search here I found your thread here on the blog.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Health/janne-k...1#.T4If6tnsYUU

    I cannot express HOW MUCH locomotor training did for ME!

    It does not work for EVERY ONE but, what it did for me was give me back some mobility. I hope MORE SCI's here on the blog take the opportunity for locomotor training and or a Next Step or Project walk or some other higher level of physical therapy regiment. It is not easy and the word "exhausting" is an understatement. The possibility of results are not guaranteed but if nothing is ventured then the possibility will always be an unknown.

  2. #402

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by ColonusFan View Post
    Dear manouli,

    I was watching the ABC News tonight and saw the story of Janne Kouri. When I did a search here I found your thread here on the blog.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Health/janne-k...1#.T4If6tnsYUU

    I cannot express HOW MUCH locomotor training did for ME!

    It does not work for EVERY ONE but, what it did for me was give me back some mobility. I hope MORE SCI's here on the blog take the opportunity for locomotor training and or a Next Step or Project walk or some other higher level of physical therapy regiment. It is not easy and the word "exhausting" is an understatement. The possibility of results are not guaranteed but if nothing is ventured then the possibility will always be an unknown.

    Hi ColonusFan, thanks for writing. Can you tell us more details regarding your experience with loco motor therapy, when did you started and for how long and exactly what return did you have? Is it too expensive? The best way to learn about this, is from people like you who did do it. What level is your injury?


    Thanks a lot,manouli.

  3. #403
    Watch Me Walk”
    Share
    By: Elizabeth Svoboda
    In Issue: March/April 2012



    quote:

    To circumvent this issue Moritz and his colleagues are experimenting with sending electrical signals directly to the spinal cord instead of the muscles. His work and that of other scientists demonstrates that when a spinal cord is stimulated electrically, it sends instructions to the limbs to perform complex acts like reaching or grabbing. Although connections between the brain and the spinal cord are damaged after injury, Moritz thinks this technique may help restore some hand and arm function.
    read article here:

    http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2...atch-walk.html

  4. #404
    Article posted: 4/16/2012 6:00 AM
    New treatments give spinal injury patients hope


    Brandon Loney can't move his legs, but once a week, he sure does run.

    Suspended by a harness from the ceiling at Courage Center in Golden Valley, Minn., the 23-year-old stares ahead at a mirror while two volunteers move his stocky legs across a treadmill. A third volunteer straddles the treadmill and keeps Loney balanced. A fourth controls the machine and rotates in when the others get tired.

    For Loney, paralyzed from the neck down in a 2009 diving accident, the exhausting “locomotor” therapy helps his body fight infections. It keeps his muscles strong.

    And maybe it will keep his body ready for a treatment breakthrough that can give him back lost mobility.

    “I'm trying to stay as fit as I can,” the former hockey player said, “and hopefully be a good contestant when they do come up with something.”

    Hope like that was once drummed out of spine injury patients, in part because doctors saw the despair that set in when patients clung to the notion of a recovery that never came.

    more...

    http://www.dailyherald.com/article/2...life/703269616

  5. #405

    Neural stem cell transplants for spinal cord injury maximized by combined, compliment

    Public release date: 17-Apr-2012
    [ Print | E-mail | Share ] [ Close Window ]

    Contact: David Eve
    celltransplantation@gmail.com
    Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

    Neural stem cell transplants for spinal cord injury maximized by combined, complimentary therapies


    Tampa, Fla. (April. 17, 2012) – Combined, complimentary therapies have the ability to maximize the benefits of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation for spinal cord repair in rat models, according to a study carried out by a team of Korean researchers who published in a recent issue of Cell Transplantation (20:9), now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/.

    "When transplanted, neural stem cells have demonstrated their therapeutic potential to reverse complex pathological processes following spinal cord injury," said study corresponding author Dr. Byung G. Kim of the Ajou University School of Medicine's Brain Disease Research Center and Department of Neurology, Republic of Korea. "However, many obstacles cannot be overcome by NSC transplant alone."

    Their study demonstrated that a combination of treatment strategies - a polymer scaffold, neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and chondroitinase (an enzyme which helps digest the glial scar that formed after a spinal cord injury) - provided added therapeutic benefits to NSC transplantation. The implantation of a polymer scaffold designed to bridge lesion cavities, created a favorable tissue environment for nerve growth. Incorporating the NT3 gene into the transplanted cells improved cell survival and migration while the addition of chondroitinase positively affected neural activity between the scaffold and the spinal cord.

    continue...

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-nsc041712.php

  6. #406

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Public release date: 17-Apr-2012
    [ Print | E-mail | Share ] [ Close Window ]

    Contact: David Eve
    celltransplantation@gmail.com
    Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

    Neural stem cell transplants for spinal cord injury maximized by combined, complimentary therapies


    Tampa, Fla. (April. 17, 2012) – Combined, complimentary therapies have the ability to maximize the benefits of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation for spinal cord repair in rat models, according to a study carried out by a team of Korean researchers who published in a recent issue of Cell Transplantation (20:9), now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/.

    "When transplanted, neural stem cells have demonstrated their therapeutic potential to reverse complex pathological processes following spinal cord injury," said study corresponding author Dr. Byung G. Kim of the Ajou University School of Medicine's Brain Disease Research Center and Department of Neurology, Republic of Korea. "However, many obstacles cannot be overcome by NSC transplant alone."

    Their study demonstrated that a combination of treatment strategies - a polymer scaffold, neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and chondroitinase (an enzyme which helps digest the glial scar that formed after a spinal cord injury) - provided added therapeutic benefits to NSC transplantation.
    Excellent read!! Refreshing read after reading all the bullshit about nerve transplants or cyborg like surgeries. a treatment using polymer scaffold, neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and chondroitinase is alott closer than being turned into a half machine or the mutalation that comes with nerve transplants.

    Come on Acordia, let it happen!

    "The researchers concluded that, given their success, similar treatment for humans should be carried out in a chronic injury setting."
    "I'm manic as hell-
    But I'm goin' strong-
    Left my meds on the sink again-
    My head will be racing by lunchtime"

    <----Scott Weiland---->

  7. #407
    so many rats were saved!

  8. #408
    Quote Originally Posted by east dragon View Post
    so many rats were saved!
    lost in translation. maybe you should try using an online translation tool to get a better understanding of the article in your language if english isnt your native tongue.

    the article simply describes the findings/ results when a combo treatment of polymer scaffold, neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and chondroitinase was used in a rat model.

    Its freaking crazy how some bitch about lack of research and when there is meaningful research they still bitch. just a general observation of some of my sci brother en.
    "I'm manic as hell-
    But I'm goin' strong-
    Left my meds on the sink again-
    My head will be racing by lunchtime"

    <----Scott Weiland---->

  9. #409
    Artificial brain-muscle connections restore monkeys' hand movement after paralysis
    Source :


    Last Updated: Thu, Apr 19, 2012 13:20 hrs

    System I Java Free report. Why top companies use Seagull for modernizing Legacy apps seagull.rocketsoftware.com Ads by GoogleResearchers have found that an artificial connection between the brain and muscles can restore complex hand movements in monkeys following paralysis.

    The research team led by Lee E. Miller, Ph.D., professor of physiology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, describe how they combined two pieces of technology to create a neuroprosthesis - a device that replaces lost or impaired nervous system function.

    One piece is a multi-electrode array implanted directly into the brain, which serves as a brain-computer interface (BCI).

    The array allows researchers to detect the activity of about 100 brain cells and decipher the signals that generate arm and hand movements.

    The second piece is a functional electrical stimulation (FES) device that delivers electrical current to the paralysed muscles, causing them to contract. The brain array activates the FES device directly, bypassing the spinal cord to allow intentional, brain-controlled muscle contractions and restore movement.






    continue...

    http://www.sify.com/news/artificial-...tnugjhjfi.html

  10. #410
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Hi ColonusFan, thanks for writing. Can you tell us more details regarding your experience with loco motor therapy, when did you started and for how long and exactly what return did you have? Is it too expensive? The best way to learn about this, is from people like you who did do it. What level is your injury?


    Thanks a lot,manouli.
    C4/5 1.6 years post. I too did lokomat training, search YouTube for "Shannon lokomat". I did 12 weeks, Mon-Fri, 1 hour, on the lokomat. I started at 40% body weight support, 1.7 k/h, 80% leg assistance and both feet toe support. I ended with 5% body weight support, 2.5 k/h, 30% leg assist, no left toe support and little right toe support. My tone and pain have increased in general. I have notices some sensory return, mostly pressure sensory in the feet, I can feel loading in my heel and toes. I walk a little better with my forearm crutches, less or no tripping. But I do have more pan in the quads. My good days arm much better, bad days about the same.

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