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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #121
    Ohio Spinal Cord Injury Victims Getting a Better Outlook

    Thousands of Americans sustain traumatic spinal cord injuries every year. Learn more about some of the common causes, and the new treatments being developed.

    August 10, 2011 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Ohio Spinal Cord Injury Victims Getting a Better Outlook

    Spinal cord injuries impact the lives of thousands of Americans every year. Damage to sensitive nerve tissues can result in partial or total paralysis, making day to day activities a challenge for many victims. But, some companies are developing innovative treatments that offer renewed hope to patients who have suffered extensive spinal cord injuries.

    The New Techniques
    read...

    http://www.24-7pressrelease.com/pres...ook-228461.php

  2. #122
    Senior Member Stormycoon's Avatar
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    silver new treatment

    "Silver Helps Regrow Tissues in Hundreds of Patients - Destroyed Cells Regenerate With Silver-Based Procedure"
    by Samuel Etris
    Senior Technical Consultant to The Silver InstituteSilver can help regenerate human cells that have been destroyed by disease or damaged in accidents.
    The silver-based procedure has been so successful in clinical tests, that one patient who had sustained three crushed fingers in an accident grew new tissue immediately. Within 2-1/2 months, skin coverage was complete and there was normal, full sensation, good blood supply and all joints had a normal range of motion. If left untreated, the 3~year-old electrician's fingers would have fallen off after turning black with gangrene, and he would have been left with a totally useless hand. In fact, his orthopedic surgeon recommended amputation of al1 three fingers, but the patient requested silver-ion therapy that was successful.
    The mechanism by which silver ions help rebuild tissue has been studied for more than a decade by Robert O. Becker, M. D., Becker Biomagnetics, Lowville, New York. Becker first reported his findings at the First International Conference on Silver and Gold in Medicine, cosponsored by The Silver Institute in 1987.
    In the decade since, this technique has been used in a clinical setting at Mountain Medical Specialties in Lakemont, Georgia, where hundreds of patients with various wounds have recovered. In addition, a laboratory study conducted by the U.S. Army Institute for Surgical Research in Fort Sam Houston, Texas, showed that laboratory animals with burn wounds treated under controlled conditions experienced shortened time for reconstruction with silver-nylon dressings. Recovery of skin function was faster when electric current was applied compared to no application of electric current.
    Becker discovered that when positively charged silver ions are electrically introduced into wounds with a proprietary silver-coated nylon fabric used as the positive electrode, large amounts of primitive embryonic stem cells are produced. These stem cells are responsible for the reconstruction of destroyed tissue at a pace considerably faster than if the wound had been left to heal by itself. In other cases, the wound might not heal at all without the introduction of these stem cells
    "The advantages of this technique," says Becker, "are the ease of use, use of the patient's own cells, no immune reaction, no need to use human fetusus as a source of stem cells, no need for anti-rejection drugs and it is economic." [bag - the pharmas just hate that]
    On September 29, 1998, Becker received a U.S. patent (5,814,094) for the devices, materials and techniques involved in regeneration of tissue using silver ions.
    After several hundred cases, Becker believes that the technique works in three stages. The first stage is the chemical combination of the highly active free silver ions with all bacteria or fungi present in the wound that are inactivated within 20 to 30 minutes. The second stage occurs over the next few days. Silver acts on fibroblast cells (the cells that normally cause wound healing by scar formation) to cause them to revert to their embryonic state, becoming stem cells. These cells are universal building blocks whose role is to reconstruct new tissue regenerating the original structure rather than simply to form scar tissue only.
    In the final stage, silver ions form a complex with the living cells in the wound area to produce immediately convertible stem cells. As stem cells flood the wound, they are rapidly converted into new, mature normal tissues of the types present before the wound occurred. The end result of this conversion is complete restoration of all anatomical structures including nerves and blood supply with no scar formation. In all cases treated, no evidence of argyria (discoloration of skin) or any other side effect was noted.
    No other known treatment provides sufficient numbers of the embryonic or stem cells required for true regeneration of damaged or destroyed tissue in humans and animals. This success indicates that there is the potential not only for the healing of near-surface wounds, but for regenerative repair of internal organs such as the heart, liver, brain and the spinal cord.
    I am not your rolling wheels
    I am the highway
    I am not your carpet ride
    I am the sky
    I am not your blowing wind
    I am the lightning
    I am not your autumn moon
    I am the night, the night..

  3. #123
    Senior Member Leo's Avatar
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    a little more,

    http://utsurg.uth.tmc.edu/pedisurger.../levine-cv.htm

    http://utsurg.uth.tmc.edu/pedisurger...-clinical.html

    Safety of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury in Children
    This is a FDA approved pilot study, conducted at Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital and sponsored in part by TIRR, to determine if bone marrow harvest and transplantation are safe in children with SCI. Ten children, ages 0-15 years of age who have suffered a SCI within 6 months to 4 years of study enrollment, will undergo bone marrow aspiration. Following cell processing, the children will then receive an Intravenous infusion of their cells. They will return at 30 days and 6 months post-procedure for follow-up to assess late functional outcome using pre-transplantation spinal cord function as the control.
    Safety of Autologous Human Cord Blood as a Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury in Children
    This is a FDA approved pilot study, conducted at Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital and sponsored in part by Cord Blood Registry (CBR), to determine if autologous hUCB transplantation for TBI is logistically feasible and safe. Ten children, ages 18 months -17 years who have suffered a severe to moderate TBI 6 months to 18 months prior and who have their own cord blood banked at CBR, will receive an intravenous infusion of their cord blood derived cells. Follow-up will occur at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years post-procedure to assess improvement using pre and post-TBI neuropsychological and imaging outcomes measures.

    -----------------------
    wow, almost 1 million

    anyone know about this researcher or live near his lab

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Published Sunday, August 07, 2011 12:07 AM
    Texas A&M team granted funding
    By MICHELLE CASADY
    michelle.casady@theeagle.com


    Less invasive and more successful treatments for people with spinal cord injuries could be available soon, in part because of research that's scheduled to begin this October at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

    The Department of Defense awarded a $900,000 competitive grant to a team of researchers, led by Jonathan Levine, who is an assistant professor in neurology at the CVM.

    The team will also collaborate with researchers at the University of California San Francisco.

    It is hoped that the study of naturally occurring spinal cord injuries in dogs will lead to better treatments for humans.

    "What's been done in labs across the country is the study of spinal cord injuries in rodents, where the spinal cord is traumatized purposefully, and then treatments are given," Levine said. "But the 70 or so treatments in rodents that have shown promise, when they're taken to human clinical trials, very few have worked."



    read....

    http://www.theeagle.com/local/A-amp-...ranted-funding
    http://justadollarplease.org/

    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member

    "You kids and your cures, why back when I was injured they gave us a wheelchair and that's the way it was and we liked it!" Grumpy Old Man

    .."i used to be able to goof around so much because i knew Superman had my back. now all i've got is his example -- and that's gonna have to be enough."

  4. #124
    Published: Friday, Aug. 12, 2011 / Updated: Friday, Aug. 12, 2011 02:28 PM
    Leading Spinal Cord Injury Researcher, James A. Krause, Ph.D., to Receive 2011 Medtronic National Courage Award
    Courage Center
    MINNEAPOLIS, Aug. 12, 2011 --

    /PRNewswire/ -- James S. Krause, Ph.D., a Minnesota native, is the 2011 recipient of the Medtronic National Courage Award presented by Courage Center. Dr. Krause, a professor and associate dean for Research in the College of Health Professions at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston, is a leading national expert and research psychologist who specializes in adjustment following a spinal cord injury.

    The award is especially meaningful to Krause, who has a spinal cord injury at the C6-7 level. From 1976-79, he was a patient at Courage Center's Transitional Rehabilitation Program (TRP), known then as Courage Residence. A three-year inpatient stay at Courage Center was common during in the 1970s and 1980s. Today, the average length of stay for someone with a spinal cord injury is 99 days.



    Read more: http://www.heraldonline.com/2011/08/...#ixzz1Us2PsKyA

  5. #125
    Drug could heal spinal injuries
    by ANDREA PERRY, femail.co.uk

    People who are permanently paralysed - like Superman actor Christopher Reeve - may one day be able to take a drug which will repair spinal injuries.

    Although the research is still in its infancy, scientists believe they have found the key to regenerating damaged nerve cells.

    The discovery might eventually lead to the development of a drug which will enable the central nervous system to repair itself after injury.

    Broken spinal cords could grow back together and it may also be possible to repair brain injuries caused by strokes or blows to the skull, or halt the devastating progression of multiple sclerosis.

    more...

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...-injuries.html

  6. #126
    Savannah para/quadriplegics at YMCA seek to expand program
    Posted: August 15, 2011 - 4:03pm

    By Chris Kardish Copyright 2011 . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    read this article here:

    http://savannahnow.com/latest-news/2...expand-program
    Last edited by manouli; 08-15-2011 at 06:56 PM.

  7. #127
    InVivo Therapeutics Treats the Spinal Cord Itself, A Novel Technology
    Posted by iCELL News, on 15th August 2011, in Stem Cell Research.

    InVivo Therapeutics Treats the Spinal Cord Itself, A Novel Technology

    Written by Herina Ayot on Aug 15, 2011

    Print PDF

    Frank Reynolds, President and CEO of InVivo Therapeutics was interviewed by OneMedRadio where he describes the company’s strategy in bringing its unique spinal cord injury (SPI) products to market.

    Brett Johnson: Good day. This is Brett Johnson with OneMedRadio in New York City. Today, I’m with Frank Reynolds who is the CEO of InVivo Therapeutics, a Cambridge, Massachusetts Company that develops treatments to improve function for those paralyzed as a result of traumatic spinal cord injury. The company was founded in 2005 with a technology developed at MIT. It’s traded on the bulletin board at NVIV.

    The company recently announced that they had submitted an investigational device exemption to the FDA for a device to protect spinal tissue and prevent secondary injury following traumatic spinal cord injury. Thanks for joining us today, Frank.

    Frank Reynolds: Thank you very much for having me.

    BJ: Can you tell us first a little bit about InVivo the business and the significance of your submission to the FDA and what this might mean for InVivo?

    FR: Sure. So today, there is no treatment for spinal cord injury other than treating from trauma to areas around the spinal cord itself. So there will be spinal fixation devices and maybe anti-inflammatory treatments to try and calm, you could say, the areas outside of the spinal cord. But there actually isn’t a treatment that actually is implanted into the spinal cord itself.

    So we’ve submitted an application that doesn’t involve any drugs or cells that has only a one-year patient follow-up and we believe this treatment will provide neural protection as you mentioned earlier and then of course support neuroplasticity and regain levels of functioning in the patients in as fast as say four weeks after injury. So we’re very excited about the product. The product is also a true platform technology. So we have used the same product along with say human neural stem cells and had successfully treated monkeys with the human neural stem cells. So the first product we have submitted to the FDA will become a true platform to enable the delivery of other drugs and cells in a variety of different forms and in the end we should be able to treat just about every type of spinal cord injury there is.

    BJ: When do you find out from the FDA the status of the exemption?

    continue...

    http://investorstemcell.com/stem-cel...el-technology/

  8. #128
    Leading Spinal Cord Injury Researcher, James S. Krause, Ph.D., to Receive 2011 Medtronic National Courage Award


    Information contained on this page is provided by companies via press release distributed through PR Newswire, an independent third-party content provider. PR Newswire, WorldNow and this Station make no warranties or representations in connection therewith.

    SOURCE Courage Center

    MINNEAPOLIS, Aug. 15, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- James S. Krause, Ph.D., a Wadena Minnesota native, is the 2011 recipient of the Medtronic National Courage Award presented by Courage Center. Dr. Krause, a professor and associate dean for Research in the College of Health Professions at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston, is a leading national expert and researcher who specializes in health and longevity following a spinal cord injury.

    The award is especially meaningful to Dr. Krause, who has a spinal cord injury at the C4-5 level. From 1976-79, he was a patient at Courage Center's Transitional Rehabilitation Program (TRP), known then as Courage Residence. A three-year inpatient stay at Courage Center was common during in the 1970s and 1980s. Today, the average length of stay for someone with a spinal cord injury is 99 days.

    "With numerous medical rehabilitation and assistive technological advancements in the past 25 years, our client's length of stay in the TRP has been dramatically reduced," said Martha Swenson, senior director, Transitional Rehabilitation Program. "Our program continues to be based on a holistic approach to rehabilitation with the belief that our clients can realize their full potential in every aspect of life."

    more...

    http://www.wlns.com/story/15268494/l...type=printable

  9. #129

    Rugby stars raise over $200,000 for spinal cord injury research and rehabilitation

    Rugby stars raise over $200,000 for spinal cord injury research and rehabilitation
    Posted on August 16, 2011 by centreforbrainresearch| Leave a comment
    What an amazing night we had on Friday! Our top scientists joined sports stars from all over New Zealand to raise money for spinal cord injury.

    ← Getting spinal injury victims back on their feet
    Rugby stars raise over $200,000 for spinal cord injury research and rehabilitation
    Posted on August 16, 2011 by centreforbrainresearch| Leave a comment
    What an amazing night we had on Friday! Our top scientists joined sports stars from all over New Zealand to raise money for spinal cord injury.


    From L-R: Communications Manager Laura Fogg, SCIRU leader Professor Louise Nicholson, All Blacks captain Richie McCaw, and Brain Bee organiser Johanna Beattie

    Hosted by The Black Friday Trust at the Langham Hotel, the event was called “Believe”, and more than lived up to its name as guests gave, and kept on giving, to three recipient charities: CatWalk (research), The Spinal Trust (rehabilitation) and the New Zealand Rugby Foundation (prevention and support).

    Around $200,000 was raised for two important causes; upgrading the Auckland Rehabilitation Unit and supporting the newly-established Spinal Cord Injury Research Unit (SCIRU) based here at the Centre for Brain Research. SCIRU is led by Professor Louise Nicholson, who was there at the dinner, and forms part of the Integrative Neuroscience Facilities led by Associate Professor Bronwen Connor. The unit was established by the Catwalk Trust with the aim of finding a cure for spinal cord injury (SCI).

    read...

    http://centreforbrainresearch.wordpr...ehabilitation/

  10. #130

    Natural self-repair mechanisms that kick in soon after spinal cord damage recognized

    Natural self-repair mechanisms that kick in soon after spinal cord damage recognized
    August 18th, 2011 admin Posted in Healthcare News | No Comments »



    — scientists within the college of Alberta’s Faculty of Rehabilitation medication have designed a vital discovery that might cause much more helpful treatment options for spinal-cord injuries. Karim Fouad and David Bennett have recognized a single on the body’s all-natural self-repair mechanisms that kick in soon after damage.

    To assist recognize the discovery the scientists say it is actually essential to initial illustrate the neurons within the spinal cord that manage muscle contractions. These neurons symbolize a reasonably autonomous component on the nervous process that manage several fundamental capabilities like as strolling and bladder manage. These neurons are introduced right into a state of readiness by a transmitter referred to as serotonin. Serotonin originates within the brain and tasks down the spinal cord exactly where it binds to serotonin receptors about the neurons. This approach turns a tranquil neuron into a single that is prepared to reply to rapid inputs from your brain.

    read...

    http://ihnma.com/2011/08/18/natural-...ge-recognized/

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