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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #1091
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    BioArctic's interim analysis of phase 1/2 study of SC0806 in patients with CSC injury halts spinal cord injury project
    BioArctic AB (STO: BIOAB), a Swedish research-based biopharmaceutical company, reported on Monday the results of an interim analysis of a phase 1/2 study of SC0806 in patients with complete spinal cord injury.
    Under this analysis, none of the patients showed an effect as measured by electrical impulses passing through the injured area after treatment. Electrical impulse passage is considered a prerequisite to restore motor function. This means that the study did not meet the primary efficacy endpoint. Also, the results did not show convincing efficacy on secondary endpoints regarding motor function, other functions or quality of life.
    Based on these results BioArctic has decided to stop the inclusion of patients in the ongoing phase 1/2 study. The company has also decided not to further develop the complete spinal cord injury project after the final patient has completed the training programme.
    more...
    https://www.m2.com/m2/web/story.php/20199359700
    Experimental Treatment Yields Amazing Results For Mayo Patient


    Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) - The Mayo Clinic cautions the human trial is still in a very early stage, but the first patient to receive a new stem cell therapy for paralysis has experienced an amazing recovery.
    53-year-old Chris Barr suffered a catastrophic spinal cord injury in a surfing accident in 2017, and after intensive rehabilitation, faced a lifetime with limited movement and feeling below his neck. That apparently made him the perfect candidate for a Mayo Clinic study led by Dr. Mohamad Bydon, who enrolled Barr in a phase 1 clinical trial to determine if the experimental therapy is safe. It involves removing stem cells from fat tissue in the patient?s body and expanding their number into a mega-dose that is then injected into the injured spinal cord.
    "We want to intervene when the physical function has plateaued, so that we do not allow the intervention to take credit for early improvements that occur as part of the natural history with many spinal cord injuries. In this case, the patient was injected with stem cells nearly one year after his injury," Dr. Bydon says.

    more..
    https://krocnews.com/experimental-tr...-mayo-patient/

  2. #1092
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Experimental Treatment Yields Amazing Results For Mayo Patient


    Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) - The Mayo Clinic cautions the human trial is still in a very early stage, but the first patient to receive a new stem cell therapy for paralysis has experienced an amazing recovery.
    53-year-old Chris Barr suffered a catastrophic spinal cord injury in a surfing accident in 2017, and after intensive rehabilitation, faced a lifetime with limited movement and feeling below his neck. That apparently made him the perfect candidate for a Mayo Clinic study led by Dr. Mohamad Bydon, who enrolled Barr in a phase 1 clinical trial to determine if the experimental therapy is safe. It involves removing stem cells from fat tissue in the patient?s body and expanding their number into a mega-dose that is then injected into the injured spinal cord.
    "We want to intervene when the physical function has plateaued, so that we do not allow the intervention to take credit for early improvements that occur as part of the natural history with many spinal cord injuries. In this case, the patient was injected with stem cells nearly one year after his injury," Dr. Bydon says.

    more..
    https://krocnews.com/experimental-tr...-mayo-patient/



    November 27, 2019
    Mayo Clinic research is a step toward hope for spinal cord injuries
    By Susan Buckles

    I want to try this! I might get something back to be helpful to my everyday life.

    Early research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings examines the first case at Mayo Clinic of stem cell therapy tested in humans for spinal cord injury. The case study found stem cell intervention, which took place after standard surgery, and physical and occupational therapy, restored some function in a patient with spinal cord injury. The report, "Celltop Clinical Trial: First Report From a Phase I Trial of Autologous Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Paralysis Due to Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury" is published in the Nov. 27, 2019 edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
    The research discusses the experience related to the first case in a phase I safety study of mesenchymal stem cell treatment for spinal cord injury. Mohamad Bydon, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologic surgeon and the lead author, cautions that each patient is different, so it's too early to consider stem cell therapies as a treatment or cure for paralysis from spinal cord injury. Dr. Bydon adds that much like early trials in general, the stem cell trials are going to show variable response rates.
    more...
    https://regenerativemedicineblog.may...cord-injuries/

  3. #1093
    To state that someone has plateaued after a year is, in my opinion, stretching it. I continued to experience recovery many years out. It seems likely to me that they might not have waited long enough? But this is certainly worth watching. And he was borderline acute/chronic. Also, he definitely was incomplete (for whatever that's worth anymore) experiencing some recovery early on.
    Last edited by GreaseLightning; 12-03-2019 at 10:46 PM.

  4. #1094
    Exactly!!! Their inclusion criteria is Asia A or Asia B. Yet they admit this guy was Asia C and he was already walking.

    I'm not saying the stem cells did not help.
    But who knows really? There is no way he plateaued at one year as an Asia C.

    I did not start walking decently with a walker until 1 year. With extensive exercise someone with that much return can improve indefinitely...

    All that said if they offered the stem cells to me I would take them in a minute
    Last edited by Mitchitsu; 12-03-2019 at 04:29 PM.

  5. #1095
    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchitsu View Post
    Exactly!!! Their inclusion criteria is Asia A or Asia B. Yet they admit this guy was Asia C and he was already walking.

    I'm not saying the stem cells did not help.
    But who knows really? There is no way he plateaued at one year as an Asia C.

    I did not start walking decently with a walker until 1 year. With extensive exercise someone with that much return can improve indefinitely...

    All that said if they offered the stem cells to me I would take them in a minute



    Transforming thoughts to movement offers new hope for spinal cord injury patients
    A paralyzed research participant, who was implanted with a brain-machine interface, is using his thoughts to initiate steps while on a robotic walking simulator. Photo: The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis
    By Scott Roy
    11-04-2019

    /"/"/"/"https://www.addtoany.com/share
    A team of researchers at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis and the Miller School of Medicine is using a brain-machine interface to help restore function in paralysis patients after spinal cord injury.
    What if paralyzed limbs could move using only the power of one?s thoughts? Borrowing a story line from the realm of science fiction, a team of researchers at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis ? together with neurosurgeons and biomedical engineers from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine ? are using a brain-machine interface to make this once seemingly impossible feat a reality for people who are living with spinal cord injury (SCI).
    read..
    https://news.miami.edu/stories/2019/...-patients.html

  6. #1096
    Dec
    03,
    2019
    A common drug could help restore limb function after spinal cord injury
    In mouse study, nerve pain drug gabapentin promotes regeneration of neural circuits
    Follow me on Twitter (opens in new window) Add me on LinkedIn (opens in new window) Emily Caldwell
    Ohio State News
    caldwell.151@osu.edu
    Long-term treatment with gabapentin, a commonly prescribed drug for nerve pain, could help restore upper limb function after a spinal cord injury, new research in mice suggests.
    In the study, mice treated with gabapentin regained roughly 60 percent of forelimb function in a skilled walking test, compared to restoration of approximately 30 percent of forelimb function in mice that received a placebo.
    The drug blocks activity of a protein that has a key role in the growth process of axons, the long, slender extensions of nerve cell bodies that transmit messages. The protein stops axon growth at times when synapses form, allowing transmission of information to another nerve cell.
    The research showed that gabapentin blocks the protein from putting on its brakes, which effectively allowed axons to grow longer after injury.
    more...
    https://news.osu.edu/a-common-drug-c...l-cord-injury/

  7. #1097
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Dec
    03,
    2019
    A common drug could help restore limb function after spinal cord injury
    In mouse study, nerve pain drug gabapentin promotes regeneration of neural circuits
    Follow me on Twitter (opens in new window) Add me on LinkedIn (opens in new window) Emily Caldwell
    Ohio State News
    caldwell.151@osu.edu
    Long-term treatment with gabapentin, a commonly prescribed drug for nerve pain, could help restore upper limb function after a spinal cord injury, new research in mice suggests.
    In the study, mice treated with gabapentin regained roughly 60 percent of forelimb function in a skilled walking test, compared to restoration of approximately 30 percent of forelimb function in mice that received a placebo.
    The drug blocks activity of a protein that has a key role in the growth process of axons, the long, slender extensions of nerve cell bodies that transmit messages. The protein stops axon growth at times when synapses form, allowing transmission of information to another nerve cell.
    The research showed that gabapentin blocks the protein from putting on its brakes, which effectively allowed axons to grow longer after injury.
    more...
    https://news.osu.edu/a-common-drug-c...l-cord-injury/

    Spinal cord injury assessment and treatment the focus of new Adelaide clinical trial
    By Helen Frost
    Posted Sun at 2:32pm
    An on-field collision during round two of the 1975 VFL season changed Mr Sachse's life, leaving him a quadriplegic.
    He still remembers the long process of having his injury assessed.
    "They used a pinprick to test what level of injury you are. That still happens today," he said.
    "So nothing's changed in those 44 years as far as the diagnostic tool is concerned."
    read....
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-...laide/11776890

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