Page 94 of 101 FirstFirst ... 4484858687888990919293949596979899100101 LastLast
Results 931 to 940 of 1009

Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #931
    Engineering a Solution to Spinal Cord Injuries
    The Engineer posted on November 23, 2017 | Comment

    Like an earthquake that ruptures a road, traumatic spinal cord injuries render the body's neural highway impassable. To date, there are neither workable repairs nor detours that will restore signal flow between the brain and limbs, reversing paralysis.
    "The problem with spinal cord injuries is that nerve cells do not regenerate," explained Treena Arinzeh, director of the New Jersey Institute of Technology's Tissue Engineering and Applied Biomaterials Lab, who has proposed a solution: a scaffold, made of an energetic polymer, that will coax nerve cells to extend their axons over the spine's damaged section.
    read...

    https://www.engineering.com/Designer...-Injuries.aspx

  2. #932
    New trial aiming to repair injured spinal cords gives new hope to paralysed Australians

    ⦁ Anne-Marie Howarth was riding her motorcycle in the Blue Mountains when she went too fast on a bend, crashed into a barrier and "squashed" her spine, leaving her paralysed from the lower chest down.
    In the 12 years since, Ms Howarth, 43, never thought she would see a medical breakthrough that reversed spinal cord injuries in her lifetime, let alone in five years.
    But that's now the reality. A trial will begin in Sydney next year where scientists will use electrical currents to jump-start the broken spinal cords of quadriplegics.
    read...
    http://www.smh.com.au/national/new-t...30-gzvzwe.html

  3. #933
    The thread was great... 94 pages packed with information, thank you!

  4. #934
    New Spinal Cord Injury Repair Company Launched
    Elizabeth Hofheinz, M.P.H., M.Ed. • Fri, August 18th, 2017
    Print this article
    Based on an innovative technology from Yale University which has shown promise to grow nerve fibers naturally and restore all facets of nerve function, a new company, ReNetX Bio (formerly known as Axerion Therapeutics), has been launched.
    ReNetX Bio is focused on providing physicians with a novel treatment for central nervous system injuries. Its inaugural CEO is Erika Smith, a 25-year veteran investor and entrepreneur who has invested in, managed and successfully exited numerous seed and early-stage investments with funding from Yale and Johnson & Johnson. Most recently, Ms. Smith was director of the Blavatnik Fund for Innovation at Yale University.
    The company also announced that it was seeking funding via a Series A financing to pay for its first clinical trial of its lead therapeutic candidate, Nogo Trap, in patients with chronic spinal cord injury.
    The company wrote in its July 24, 2017 news release, “ReNetX licensed the rights of the innovative neuro-restorative Nogo Receptor platform technology discovered by Stephen Strittmatter, M.D., Ph.D., at Yale University and founder and scientific advisor to ReNetX. The central nervous system contains major extracellular factors that limit regrowth of neurons. The company has developed a decoy receptor, called Nogo Trap, that binds the growth inhibitors allowing the body to grow nerve fibers naturally and directly targeting restoration across all facets of growth: axonal regeneration (long distance), axonal sprouting (medium distance) and synaptic plasticity.”
    more....
    https://ryortho.com/breaking/new-spi...pany-launched/

  5. #935
    Public Release: 11-Dec-2017
    Scientists discover new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury
    University of Bristol
    \l "\l "\l "\l "Share
    Print E-Mail
    There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury or treatment to help nerve regeneration so therapies offering intervention are limited. People with severe spinal cord injuries can remain paralysed for life and this is often accompanied by incontinence.
    A team led by Drs Liang-Fong Wong and Nicolas Granger from Bristol's Faculty of Health Sciences has successfully transplanted genetically modified cells that secrete a treatment molecule shown to be effective at removing the scar following spinal cord damage. The scar in the damaged spinal cord typically limits recovery by blocking nerve regrowth.
    more....

    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea...-sdn120817.php

  6. #936
    Epithelial stem cells can treat spinal cord injury



    According to the World Health Organization, approximately 250,000 to 500,000 people suffer from spinal cord injuries each year. A lot of these injuries are due to preventable causes, such as car crashes and falls.
    Spinal cord injuries often lead to mental disorders, with an estimated 20-30 percent of those affected showing symptoms of depression.
    In addition, there still remain various obstacles that people with disabilities face in modern society. For example, children with spinal cord injuries are less likely to attend school, and adults with the injury face a higher rate of unemployment.
    more...
    http://www.jhunewsletter.com/2017/11...l-cord-injury/

  7. #937
    Public Release: 11-Dec-2017
    Scientists discover new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury
    University of Bristol
    \l "\l "\l "\l "Share
    Print E-Mail
    There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury or treatment to help nerve regeneration so therapies offering intervention are limited. People with severe spinal cord injuries can remain paralysed for life and this is often accompanied by incontinence.
    A team led by Drs Liang-Fong Wong and Nicolas Granger from Bristol's Faculty of Health Sciences has successfully transplanted genetically modified cells that secrete a treatment molecule shown to be effective at removing the scar following spinal cord damage. The scar in the damaged spinal cord typically limits recovery by blocking nerve regrowth.
    read...
    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea...-sdn120817.php

  8. #938
    Spinal cord injury BREAKTHROUGH: New treatment to regenerate nerves in patients
    SCIENTISTS are hoping that a new treatment to regenerate nerves in patients with a spinal cord injury could lead to a breakthrough in helping people who are paralysed.
    PUBLISHED: 19:01, Mon, Dec 11, 2017
    A team at the University of Bristol has successfully transplanted genetically modified cells in rodents to trigger nerve regeneration.
    The procedure has been shown to secrete a treatment molecule that is effective at removing the spinal cord scar, which typically limits recovery by blocking nerve regrowth.
    There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury or treatment to help nerve regeneration, so therapies are limited.
    People with severe spinal cord injuries can remain paralysed for life and this is often accompanied by incontinence.
    read...
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/89...enerate-nerves

  9. #939
    I do like this company!

    Yale Discovery And Startup: Provide Hope for those with Spinal Cord Injury
    NEW HAVEN, Conn., July 2017.
    ​Yale neurology and neuroscience professor Stephen Strittmatter has made a discovery that has long eluded researchers—how to regrow damaged nerve fibers after an injury. If effective—and animal studies show real promise—the discovery would provide doctors a way to treat what has thus far been untreatable—spinal cord injury. Read more.
    http://www.renetx.com/news.html

  10. #940
    Positive update on Asterias’ SCiStar study for spinal cord injury at TMM 2017
    November 27, 2017 / Samantha Yammine
    This guest blog is reposted with permission from Signals Blog, published by the Center for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine (CCRM) in Canada.
    With the extensive exploitation of regenerative medicine through the marketing and selling of unapproved stem cell “therapies” online, it was refreshing to hear an update about clinical trials for a legitimate stem cell therapy at the Till & McCulloch Meetings (TMM) in Canada earlier this month.
    Dr. Jane Lebkowski, of Asterias, speaking at TMM 2017
    Dr. Jane Lebkowski, President of R&D and Chief Scientific Officer at Asterias Biotherapeutics Inc. shared updates from their SCiStar study. This California-based company is currently in an open-label, single-arm Phase 1/2a clinical trial for testing the safety and efficacy of treating several types of spinal cord injuries (SCI) with AST-OPC1s – a type of brain cell called an oligodendrocyte progenitor cell, which they derived from pluripotent stem cells. Earlier this year they reported promising safety results in their first two cohorts of patients and clearance to proceed into additional patients. more....

    https://blog.cirm.ca.gov/2017/11/27/...y-at-tmm-2017/

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-14-2005, 09:16 AM
  2. New articles posted to Research Forums.
    By Wise Young in forum Cure
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-15-2004, 11:41 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-14-2004, 12:00 PM
  4. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-15-2003, 02:05 AM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-12-2002, 04:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •