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Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

  1. #1071
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    mmm
    w mechanisms to enable regeneration of injured nerve fibers
    Download PDF Copy
    Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 23 2019
    Injuries to nerve fibers in the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves usually result in functional losses as the nerve fibers are unable to regenerate. A team from the Department of Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universit?t Bochum (RUB) led by Professor Dietmar Fischer has deciphered new mechanisms that enable the regeneration of such fibers. This could open up new treatment approaches for the brain, optic nerve, and spinal cord injuries. The researchers report on these results in the journal Nature Communications Biology on 23 August 2019.
    read....


    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...ve-fibers.aspx

  2. #1072
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    w mechanisms to enable regeneration of injured nerve fibers
    Download PDF Copy
    Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 23 2019
    Injuries to nerve fibers in the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves usually result in functional losses as the nerve fibers are unable to regenerate. A team from the Department of Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universit?t Bochum (RUB) led by Professor Dietmar Fischer has deciphered new mechanisms that enable the regeneration of such fibers. This could open up new treatment approaches for the brain, optic nerve, and spinal cord injuries. The researchers report on these results in the journal Nature Communications Biology on 23 August 2019.
    read....


    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...ve-fibers.aspx
    Surgeon turned test subject: Paralyzed doctor gets second implant in Thailand
    Bill Graveland
    20 hrs ago


    A paralyzed Alberta man is back from Thailand after having a second experimental surgery that has given him some hope he'll be able to move more of his body.
    Dr. Richi Gill of Calgary worked as a surgeon before he had a freak accident on a boogie board during a family vacation in Hawaii that broke his neck. He doesn't have any movement or sensation below that point but does have some use of his arms.
    Gill travelled to Thailand last year to have an epidural stimulation implant placed in his lower back. The device, programmed to stimulate certain nerves mapped out by surgeons and therapists, has allowed him to take assisted steps with the help of physiotherapists and helped regulate his blood pressure.
    He recently had a second unit installed below his injury to help restore more movement to his arms and hands.
    "It's more unknown with this one for sure," Gill, 38, said following a physiotherapy session in Calgary.
    more...
    https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canad...and/ar-AAGjrcf

  3. #1073
    ReNetx has supporting peer-reviewed in animal studies listed under technology on their site (https://www.renetx.com/publications.html)

    This ref from their list might be what you are after most, JOURNAL OF NEUROTRAUMA 31:1955?1966 (December 15, 2014). If you cannot get to the .pdf, let me know

  4. #1074
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    w mechanisms to enable regeneration of injured nerve fibers
    Download PDF Copy
    Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 23 2019
    Injuries to nerve fibers in the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves usually result in functional losses as the nerve fibers are unable to regenerate. A team from the Department of Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universit?t Bochum (RUB) led by Professor Dietmar Fischer has deciphered new mechanisms that enable the regeneration of such fibers. This could open up new treatment approaches for the brain, optic nerve, and spinal cord injuries. The researchers report on these results in the journal Nature Communications Biology on 23 August 2019.
    read....


    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...ve-fibers.aspx
    The reference you are cited is talking about PTEN, not Strittmatter's Nogo trap (AXER-204). Can I steer you towards both the Technology section of ReNetX's cite?
    https://www.renetx.com/publications.html

    This paper along with 10+ others may interest you.

    J Neurotrauma. 2014 Dec 15;31(24):1955-66. doi: 10.1089/neu.2014.3355. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

  5. #1075
    Quote Originally Posted by cadamson View Post
    The reference you are cited is talking about PTEN, not Strittmatter's Nogo trap (AXER-204). Can I steer you towards both the Technology section of ReNetX's cite?
    https://www.renetx.com/publications.html

    This paper along with 10+ others may interest you.

    J Neurotrauma. 2014 Dec 15;31(24):1955-66. doi: 10.1089/neu.2014.3355. Epub 2014 Oct 16.


    First global Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research will be a ?game-changer?
    University of Alberta research team receives $3.3 million to create open-source database for international spinal cord injury research
    By Laurie Wang on August 15, 2019


    The University of Alberta and the University of California, San Francisco are teaming up to launch the world?s first Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI). A consortium of international organizations will be providing $3.3 million CAD to help fund the initiative. The ODC-SCI will improve spinal cord injury research and treatment worldwide by reducing data bias and equipping scientists by making data more accessible, enhancing research and translational efforts.
    more....
    https://www.ualberta.ca/rehabilitati...a-game-changer



    A New Japanese Stem Cell Treatment Raises Hopes ? And Ethical Questions
    The country fast-tracked the controversial therapy, opening an international rift over who should make health care decisions.


    In 2015, Shinji Kusachi, a 47-year-old teacher living in the Japanese prefecture of Okayama, was high-diving at a local pool ? a passion he had developed in his 30s ? when a tricky dive went awry. ?I hit my head on the bottom,? Kusachi recalled of the incident that damaged his spinal cord and left him mostly paralyzed. ?They said I couldn?t use my arms and legs. I was really in despair.?
    But Kusachi soon joined a clinical trial for a new treatment for spinal cord injuries called Stemirac. Researchers at Sapporo Medical University drew fluid from his bone marrow, isolated a type of stem cell found there, multiplied the cells in the lab, and infused them back into his bloodstream intravenously. The day after the treatment, Kusachi dramatically improved. ?That was a real surprise to us,? said Toshihiko Yamashita, an orthopedic surgeon at the university. ?In the afternoon, he could rise up from his bed and sit. In the evening, he was getting around in a wheelchair.?
    read....
    https://www.sci-info-pages.com/news/...cal-questions/

  6. #1076
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    First global Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research will be a ?game-changer?
    University of Alberta research team receives $3.3 million to create open-source database for international spinal cord injury research
    By Laurie Wang on August 15, 2019


    The University of Alberta and the University of California, San Francisco are teaming up to launch the world?s first Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI). A consortium of international organizations will be providing $3.3 million CAD to help fund the initiative. The ODC-SCI will improve spinal cord injury research and treatment worldwide by reducing data bias and equipping scientists by making data more accessible, enhancing research and translational efforts.
    more....
    https://www.ualberta.ca/rehabilitati...a-game-changer



    A New Japanese Stem Cell Treatment Raises Hopes ? And Ethical Questions
    The country fast-tracked the controversial therapy, opening an international rift over who should make health care decisions.


    In 2015, Shinji Kusachi, a 47-year-old teacher living in the Japanese prefecture of Okayama, was high-diving at a local pool ? a passion he had developed in his 30s ? when a tricky dive went awry. ?I hit my head on the bottom,? Kusachi recalled of the incident that damaged his spinal cord and left him mostly paralyzed. ?They said I couldn?t use my arms and legs. I was really in despair.?
    But Kusachi soon joined a clinical trial for a new treatment for spinal cord injuries called Stemirac. Researchers at Sapporo Medical University drew fluid from his bone marrow, isolated a type of stem cell found there, multiplied the cells in the lab, and infused them back into his bloodstream intravenously. The day after the treatment, Kusachi dramatically improved. ?That was a real surprise to us,? said Toshihiko Yamashita, an orthopedic surgeon at the university. ?In the afternoon, he could rise up from his bed and sit. In the evening, he was getting around in a wheelchair.?
    read....
    https://www.sci-info-pages.com/news/...cal-questions/


    Scientists develop an 'EpiPen' for brain and spinal cord injuries
    This new research could help individuals recover from one of the most dreaded types of injury.
    https://bigthink.com/u/matthewdavisMatt Davis19 July, 2019

    Brain and spinal cord injuries are notoriously difficult to treat, with many existing methods of treatment provoking undesirable side effects. Now, new research demonstrated a novel technique using nanoparticles to "program" the body's immune cells such that they don't cause any unintended damage and promote healing. Since they don't involve any pharmaceuticals, the use of nanoparticles circumvents the dangerous side effects of other treatments.
    more...

    https://bigthink.com/surprising-scie...1#rebelltitem1

    Injectable Peptide Might Help Spinal Cord Injury Patients Walk Again
    Published: May 27, 2019 By Gaius J. Augustus, PhD, Multimedia Science Communicator

    A systemically injectable peptide, which may make it possible to restore lost functions in spinal cord injury patients, is moving toward clinical trials in early 2020.
    The treatment, which was developed by Jerry Silver, a professor of neurosciences at Case Western Reserve University?s School of Medicine and advisor for NervGen Pharma, is the culmination of decades of work, and in pre-clinical studies, it has shown robust results in animal models.

    more....
    https://www.biospace.com/article/inj...ts-walk-again/

  7. #1077
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Scientists develop an 'EpiPen' for brain and spinal cord injuries
    This new research could help individuals recover from one of the most dreaded types of injury.
    https://bigthink.com/u/matthewdavisMatt Davis19 July, 2019

    Brain and spinal cord injuries are notoriously difficult to treat, with many existing methods of treatment provoking undesirable side effects. Now, new research demonstrated a novel technique using nanoparticles to "program" the body's immune cells such that they don't cause any unintended damage and promote healing. Since they don't involve any pharmaceuticals, the use of nanoparticles circumvents the dangerous side effects of other treatments.
    more...

    https://bigthink.com/surprising-scie...1#rebelltitem1

    Injectable Peptide Might Help Spinal Cord Injury Patients Walk Again
    Published: May 27, 2019 By Gaius J. Augustus, PhD, Multimedia Science Communicator

    A systemically injectable peptide, which may make it possible to restore lost functions in spinal cord injury patients, is moving toward clinical trials in early 2020.
    The treatment, which was developed by Jerry Silver, a professor of neurosciences at Case Western Reserve University?s School of Medicine and advisor for NervGen Pharma, is the culmination of decades of work, and in pre-clinical studies, it has shown robust results in animal models.

    more....
    https://www.biospace.com/article/inj...ts-walk-again/

    Intel, Brown University AI project will work on spinal cord ailments treatment

    Intel is working along with Brown University to develop artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine to help correct spinal cord defects. It will deal with the toughest spinal cord defects including paralysis.
    read....

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/finance/te...ent/ar-AAIgC6x

  8. #1078
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Intel, Brown University AI project will work on spinal cord ailments treatment

    Intel is working along with Brown University to develop artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine to help correct spinal cord defects. It will deal with the toughest spinal cord defects including paralysis.
    read....

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/finance/te...ent/ar-AAIgC6x

    Technology
    Intel, Brown University AI project will work on spinal cord ailments treatment
    The work could help restore movement to paralysed people.
    ⦁ By ⦁ Rishabh Jain October 4, 2019 11:26 BST
    ntel is working along with Brown University to develop artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine to help correct spinal cord defects. It will deal with the toughest spinal cord defects including paralysis.
    "A spinal cord injury is devastating, and little is known about how remaining circuits around the injury may be leveraged to support rehabilitation and restoration of lost function. Listening for the first time to the spinal circuits around the injury and then taking action in real time with Intel's combined AI hardware and software solutions will uncover new knowledge about the spinal cord and accelerate innovation toward new therapies," David Borton, Assistant Professor of engineering, Brown University, stated in the official press release posted on the Intel Website on Thursday.
    more...
    https://www.ibtimes.co.uk/intel-brow...atment-1669878

  9. #1079
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Technology
    Intel, Brown University AI project will work on spinal cord ailments treatment
    The work could help restore movement to paralysed people.
    ⦁ By ⦁ Rishabh Jain October 4, 2019 11:26 BST
    ntel is working along with Brown University to develop artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine to help correct spinal cord defects. It will deal with the toughest spinal cord defects including paralysis.
    "A spinal cord injury is devastating, and little is known about how remaining circuits around the injury may be leveraged to support rehabilitation and restoration of lost function. Listening for the first time to the spinal circuits around the injury and then taking action in real time with Intel's combined AI hardware and software solutions will uncover new knowledge about the spinal cord and accelerate innovation toward new therapies," David Borton, Assistant Professor of engineering, Brown University, stated in the official press release posted on the Intel Website on Thursday.
    more...
    https://www.ibtimes.co.uk/intel-brow...atment-1669878
    New $6.3 million DARPA grant to help researchers develop "intelligent spinal interface"
    Download PDF Copy
    Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 3 2019
    Supported with a new grant of $6.3 million from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), a team led by Brown University researchers will develop and test an "intelligent spinal interface" aimed at helping to restore limb movement and bladder control for people who have suffered spinal cord injuries.
    Developed in collaboration with physicians at Rhode Island Hospital, a Lifespan partner, along with commercial partners at Intel and Micro-Leads Medical, the experimental spinal interface will be designed to bridge the gap in neural circuitry created by a spinal injury, the researchers say. The idea is to record signals traveling down the spinal cord above an injury site and use them to drive electrical spinal stimulation below the lesion. At the same time, information coming up the cord from below will be used to drive stimulation above the injury. The device could potentially help to restore both volitional control of limbs muscles as well as feeling and sensation lost due to injury.

    more
    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...interface.aspx

  10. #1080

    VirTrial Awarded FDA-Approved Decentralized Clinical Trial with Hope Biosciences

    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    New $6.3 million DARPA grant to help researchers develop "intelligent spinal interface"
    Download PDF Copy
    Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 3 2019
    Supported with a new grant of $6.3 million from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), a team led by Brown University researchers will develop and test an "intelligent spinal interface" aimed at helping to restore limb movement and bladder control for people who have suffered spinal cord injuries.
    Developed in collaboration with physicians at Rhode Island Hospital, a Lifespan partner, along with commercial partners at Intel and Micro-Leads Medical, the experimental spinal interface will be designed to bridge the gap in neural circuitry created by a spinal injury, the researchers say. The idea is to record signals traveling down the spinal cord above an injury site and use them to drive electrical spinal stimulation below the lesion. At the same time, information coming up the cord from below will be used to drive stimulation above the injury. The device could potentially help to restore both volitional control of limbs muscles as well as feeling and sensation lost due to injury.

    more
    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...interface.aspx
    VirTrial Awarded FDA-Approved Decentralized Clinical Trial with Hope Biosciences
    by VirTrial | Oct 9, 2019 | Press and News | 0 comments
    Scottsdale, AZ (October 9, 2019) ? VirTrial has been awarded an FDA-approved hybrid decentralized clinical trial (DCT) with Hope Biosciences. The study provides Hope Biosciences? autologous, adipose-derived culture-expanded mesenchymal stem cells (HB-adMSC?s) for the treatment of spinal cord injury/disorder (SCI/D). Study protocol incorporates remote visits via VirTrial?s telehealth platform.
    read....
    https://virtrial.com/virtrial-awarde...e-biosciences/

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