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Thread: Paraplegic terminology

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    queef? Is that some sort of Canadian term?
    According to the urban dictionary and other references found on Google, the term has nothing to do with paralysis or spinal cord injury. I'll let you Google it instead of explaining it here.

    All the best,
    GJ

  2. #12
    I knew that definition from listening to Howard Stern for the last 20 years He has had queefing contests which are epic.

  3. #13
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    Ah, T8. I've been growing fond of you… but Howard Stern??

  4. #14
    Ok but why have two doctors lately told me i have paraparesis, this year [2011] i think they are wrong and using the old terminology cos we have walking paras quads written about everywhere now whereas if they used the term strictly virtually eveyone would just be paraparesis sufferers and not quads,paras due to them being able to move an limb below site of injury,[even minutely]?

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Quadripareis and paraparesis are old terms that are no longer supported for clinical use by the ASIA standards. They have been replaced largely by the terminology of incomplete paraplegia or tetraplegia.

    (KLD)
    well how come they are using that term today in 2011???

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by abudabi View Post
    well how come they are using that term today in 2011???
    They are still valid words and used by people who may be unaware of the ASIA classifications. I'm 18 years post, and still usually refer to myself as a T3 complete.
    Don - Grad Student Emeritus
    T3 ASIA A 26 years post injury

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by abudabi View Post
    Ok but why have two doctors lately told me i have paraparesis, this year [2011] i think they are wrong and using the old terminology cos we have walking paras quads written about everywhere now whereas if they used the term strictly virtually eveyone would just be paraparesis sufferers and not quads,paras due to them being able to move an limb below site of injury,[even minutely]?
    I agree with Donno. The terms are medical terms with specific meaning and are still being used by dotors. Paraparetic (adjective) or paraparesis (noun) refers to partial paralysis of the lower limbs. Paraplegia indicates paralysis of the lower limbs. In 1990, an American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Committee that I co-chaired with John Ditunno recommended that the term "complete" spinal cord injury be defined as having no sensation or motor control at the lowest spinal cord level, which happens to be S4/5. ASIA A is defined as having no peri-anal sensation and no voluntary sphincter contraction. Depending on the level of your injury, you may be paraparetic and still be ASIA A. For example, a person with an conus injury (an injury to the tip of the spinal cord) may be an ASIA A but paraparetic and perhaps even able to walk.

    Wise.

  8. #18
    CP terms are much more complex and unless you have CP or 5 -100 medical dictionaries available and are prepared to debate terminology to the death do not get into a debate about quad, tri, para, tetra or any other term we cp'ers use... lol

  9. #19
    yes i never said i didn't agree with Donna?? what i was saying is there is still confusion and debate top be had about the various technical terms. One can be asia A and paraparetic the vast majority of incompletes are paraparetic as well

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    I agree with Donno. The terms are medical terms with specific meaning and are still being used by dotors. Paraparetic (adjective) or paraparesis (noun) refers to partial paralysis of the lower limbs. Paraplegia indicates paralysis of the lower limbs. In 1990, an American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Committee that I co-chaired with John Ditunno recommended that the term "complete" spinal cord injury be defined as having no sensation or motor control at the lowest spinal cord level, which happens to be S4/5. ASIA A is defined as having no peri-anal sensation and no voluntary sphincter contraction. Depending on the level of your injury, you may be paraparetic and still be ASIA A. For example, a person with an conus injury (an injury to the tip of the spinal cord) may be an ASIA A but paraparetic and perhaps even able to walk.

    Wise.
    i never said i didn't agree with donna?

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