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Thread: Should I be concerned?

  1. #11
    It's normal for your heart rate to raise to 125 or so when anticipating exercise. If your HR was 125 just before you started the test, I would not be worried, your mind is telling your body to get ready for a workout, and your heart is responding. If you want to know your true resting heart rate, put on a HR monitor and lay in bed for around 20 minutes.

    I train with a HR monitor, my RHR is usually around 45bpm or so. When I first get on my handcycle, it will usually rise to around 130bpm before I even start cranking. When I'm cooling down(still cranking but very easy pace) it will fall below 80bpm. You really have to become familiar with your own HR for it to be a valuable metric.

    And yes, if you are above t6 you will notice some strange things happening. I'm a t4, when I get AD my HR will drop rapidly. I can crank harder, and it will continue to drop. I think as Blood Pressure goes up, HR goes down, but I could be wrong I'm no DR.

  2. #12
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    Hi,
    I don't really want to start an argument, but I have never seen heart rate move much in anticipation of exercise. Pre-SCI and post-SCI, my heart rate moves up smoothly from a low rate to a higher rate as I exercise. For me, this would typically be 60bpm to 120bpm over a span of ten minutes, if I ramp up gradually. Of course,if you start out hammering,it will move up more rapidly. I wonder if your 125bpm resting heart rate isn't a mistake.

    I agree with what SCI55 said also.
    C1/C2 walking quad, SCI from 4/2010

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by cajun View Post
    Hi,
    I don't really want to start an argument, but I have never seen heart rate move much in anticipation of exercise. Pre-SCI and post-SCI, my heart rate moves up smoothly from a low rate to a higher rate as I exercise. For me, this would typically be 60bpm to 120bpm over a span of ten minutes, if I ramp up gradually. Of course,if you start out hammering,it will move up more rapidly. I wonder if your 125bpm resting heart rate isn't a mistake.

    I agree with what SCI55 said also.

    Nah it's consistent everytime I handcycle it will rise to around 125 before
    I even start cranking...not arguing, but I can't resist posting this

    http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...-exercise.html

    Immediate Response of the
    Cardiovascular System to Exercise


    Heart Rate
    Resting heart rate averages 60 to 80 beats/min in healthy adults. In sedentary, middle aged individuals it may be as high as 100 beats/min. In elite endurance athletes heart rates as low as 28 to 40 beats/min have been recorded (2).
    Before exercise even begins heart rate increases in anticipation. This is known as the anticipatory response. It is mediated through the releases of a neurotransmitters called epinephrine and norepinephrine also known as adrenaline and noradrenaline (1).
    After the initial anticipatory response, heart rate increases in direct proportion to exercise intensity until a maximum heart rate is reached. Maximum heart rate is estimated with the formula 220-age. But this is only an estimation, and not particularly accurate. The only direct method for determining maximum heart rate is to exercise at increasing intensities until a plateau in heart rate is found despite the increasing work rate.

  4. #14
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    Hi jheath,
    Your post got me interested, and I started searching for info. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any quantitative info. The closest that I came was a description of "significant" in one article and "slight" in another. I also read that the effect is greatest in sprint events and decreases with age. I still think that an increase of HR from 45 BPM to 125 BPM due to anticipation of a workout is rare, but I don't have the data to know. Cheers.
    C1/C2 walking quad, SCI from 4/2010

  5. #15
    Senior Member TheAbleChef's Avatar
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    I'll check out the data and find out for sure about my resting heart rate.
    Never Give Up!

  6. #16
    Senior Member TheAbleChef's Avatar
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    Here is the email I received a few days ago.

    Greetings M. Sahney,

    Here are the analyzed results of yours tests. The key points are:

    6 minutes test:

    Total distance: 747.45 m
    Average peak heart rate: 153.17 beats/min
    Average peak VO2 max: 31.11 ml/kg/min

    Maximal arm crank test:

    Max power: 150 W
    Average peak heart rate: 163.44 beats/min
    Average peak VO2 max: 30.57 ml/kg/min

    It is interesting to see that you achieved a higher VO2 max during the 6 minutes test, which is suppose to be submaximal, which means that you really pushed yourself to your maximum.

    As I have already told you, you still hold our current record for those two tests. Your VO2 max is high and you probably have a good potential for some competitive sports if you like.

    Congratulation for your results and it have been a pleasure to work with you,

    Have a nice day.

    Simon D├ęcary, research student IRGLM
    Never Give Up!

  7. #17
    Senior Member TheAbleChef's Avatar
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    Perhaps the anticipation cause the rise in hr. I was quite excited to see how well i could do in each portion of the study. I'll measure it right after insane up to confirm. Now that i think about it, 125 does seem high for resting.

    Quote Originally Posted by jheath View Post
    Nah it's consistent everytime I handcycle it will rise to around 125 before
    I even start cranking...not arguing, but I can't resist posting this

    http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...-exercise.html

    Immediate Response of the
    Cardiovascular System to Exercise


    Heart Rate
    Resting heart rate averages 60 to 80 beats/min in healthy adults. In sedentary, middle aged individuals it may be as high as 100 beats/min. In elite endurance athletes heart rates as low as 28 to 40 beats/min have been recorded (2).
    Before exercise even begins heart rate increases in anticipation. This is known as the anticipatory response. It is mediated through the releases of a neurotransmitters called epinephrine and norepinephrine also known as adrenaline and noradrenaline (1).
    After the initial anticipatory response, heart rate increases in direct proportion to exercise intensity until a maximum heart rate is reached. Maximum heart rate is estimated with the formula 220-age. But this is only an estimation, and not particularly accurate. The only direct method for determining maximum heart rate is to exercise at increasing intensities until a plateau in heart rate is found despite the increasing work rate.
    Never Give Up!

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