Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Where are the PTs?

  1. #11

    Ask a pt

    Quote Originally Posted by scitotalfitness View Post
    What is "PM?" I'm still getting used to this forum thing.

    I totally understand that through posts, others benefit from the answers. I can start a new thread "Ask a PT" and check it at least once a week... do you think that would be helpful?
    Yes, definitely helpful.

  2. #12
    Worth a try!
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by scitotalfitness View Post
    Here I am!! I don't have a good reason why it took me so long to sign up, or why others don't. I will sadly blame time as the reason.

    I am a physical therapist with 8 years of SCI experience, and I just joined the forum a month ago. I am definitely open to answering questions. I will respond much quicker to emails as I sign on to check the forums only a couple of times a month.

    Am I allowed to post my direct email address?
    I have a home health PT who does not understand my reluctance to slide ischim over transfer board while I'm recovering from 6 mos on wound vac.He says people have fat around ischial bone. I'm suspending therapy until I'm strong enough to transfer 12" w/o hitting butt on w/c tire.Don't need PT for w/c push ups.He does not understand the unique differences in paraplegics and his home health patients.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    As I try to slow my slide down this slippery slope called aging there are issues that I have not found answers for. For example, knowing that my upper body has been devestated by repetitive stress and over use, how much and what kind of exercise is beneficial and at what point does it become counterproductive? It seems logical that exercise does cause wear and tear. Just wondering.
    I agree SCI55 that a PT could be helpful around here, for some. I think the problem comes in with lack of knowledge toward long time use/abuse of the body which is the case of SCI. PT was done in a different manner when we learned and we learned from those who were 20 years our elder. In your 70's there isn't anyone to compare it to. I believe the best way to age is to do the best you can in your own way. In other words, keep doing things the same way you have been all your life. It's going to be harder and slower but with consentration and determination most anything can be done. With all you have accomplished I wouldn't be surprised if you were in better shape than a lot of 40 year olds.

  5. #15
    to scitotalfitness:
    When I was first injured I had nothing in the line of a true support system. Had no idea where I'd go to live after hospitals and rehab, and really no one family wise who was interested in my care. In 8 months of recovering in 4 different hospitals, and a year and a half living in a nursing home, only 1 person told me I could live a life independently, in my own home, and that I could live like anyone else. That 1 person was a physical therapist who treated me like I could be anything I put my mind to. To this day, I always remember that 15 years later. I hope that you are like this too. Welcome to Carecure.
    Last edited by Lizbv; 07-23-2011 at 07:59 PM.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Handsome Wheeler View Post
    I have a home health PT who does not understand my reluctance to slide ischim over transfer board while I'm recovering from 6 mos on wound vac.He says people have fat around ischial bone. I'm suspending therapy until I'm strong enough to transfer 12" w/o hitting butt on w/c tire.Don't need PT for w/c push ups.He does not understand the unique differences in paraplegics and his home health patients.
    Yes, yours is a common problem. That is why we need a good a around here who does have experience with SCIs like the OTs and nurses.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  7. #17
    I would also be glad to answer question. PM would work great. I usually check in most mornings for a few minutes and weekends to post research updates. I have recommended this site to numerous PT colleagues. I'm not sure why they do not participate. I can tell you that if the PT does not specialize in SCI your answer regarding exercise will be generic at best.

    Bill
    “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

  8. #18
    Handsome Wheeler - you are correct to be very cautious about using a slideboard. I'm glad you're sticking to your reaction to not slide your ischials across. After being injured, the muscle atrophies and the fat disperses, and your ischials are not protected.

    That being said, you can use the board to help you transfer while you are getting stronger and preventing that "wheel bump." You can position the board more under your thighs - the meaty part of your leg, and use it to hop across. So if you can't do a depression lift all the way over, you can try to make it in 2-3 hops. This is more difficult the more bucket you have in your chair, but watching your skin - especially after a sore! is your goal. Hope that helps a bit. And there are many exercises you can do in your chair to get stronger besides WC push ups...

    Lizbv - I hope I am! I try to be

    You are all correct - spinal injury is a unique diagnosis, and unfortunately most therapists do not know how to work with your population. There is minimal education given in school just because there is so much we have to learn about - as I'm sure you understand, SCI is something you just have to see. Then the real education comes from experience.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •