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Thread: What proven acheivments have stem cells brought to human SCI?

  1. #1

    What proven acheivments have stem cells brought to human SCI?

    Well lab and animal trials look promising, the internet is flooded with patient testimonials, this forum is peppered with stem cell articles so
    I think that at this stage this is a very legitimate question,
    Ive been reading about this subject for ages and found nothing.

  2. #2
    peterf, the first legitimate human clinical trials only started last autumn/fall. It will be some time before the results of these will be known. In the meantime, more therapies will also go to trial in the near future. This can only be good for all of us.

    There are many clinics offering intravenously or intrathecally administered adult stems cells but these are now a "dime a dozen" and have shown none or very modest efficacy.

    If a therapy does show efficacy then it is very simple (far simpler than running a GMP lab to extract and culture cells) to publish scientific data about each patient following the treatment. The fact that these clinics do not, but rather rely on anecdotal evidence, is reason enough to doubt them.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by peterf View Post
    Well lab and animal trials look promising, the internet is flooded with patient testimonials, this forum is peppered with stem cell articles so
    I think that at this stage this is a very legitimate question,
    Ive been reading about this subject for ages and found nothing.
    peterf,

    Stem cells have been applied for bone marrow transplant for 40 years, since the 1970's. I don't know how many lives have been saved but probably over 20,000 bone marrow transplants are done annually with bone marrow, peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood cells. These cells replace the patients' bone marrow hematopoeitic cells and the new stem cells completely replace their blood cells (as well as other cells that the bone marrow stem cells replenish). In recent years, umbilical cord blood has outstripped bone marrow as a source of hematopoietic stem cells and is now running neck-to-neck peripheral blood derived stem cells.

    The US FDA recently approved an adult mesenchymal stem cell line as a treatment of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). As you may know, this is a disease that occurs when one transplants bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood to replace the bone marrow but the transplanted cells decide the the host cells are "foreign" and beginning attacking them. This condition is very common, occurring in as many as 80% of patients who receive bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells and 40% of patients who receive umbilical cord blood. The lower incidence of GVHD is one of the reasons why cord blood is becoming more popular.

    Many clinical trials are underway to test the effects of bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells and other cells on the heart after a myocardial infarct or in a heart that failing for other reasons. A number of clinical trials have shown positive results but, to my knowledge, there is no specific cell that has yet been approved by either the US FDA or the Europe EMA for heart failure. Several trials have been carried out involving stem cells for stroke. I anticipate that one or more therapies will be approved for heart or brain in the coming year or two. Many companies are investing in these applications.

    Regarding the spinal cord, several companies are investing in trials for spinal cord injury: Stemcyte, Geron, Stem Cell Inc., NeuralStem, California Stem Cells Inc. and others. The trials are of course at their early stages right now but they should be heading into phase 2 and 3 trials in the coming year. Let us hope they encounter success and the investment continues.

    Wise.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    peterf,

    Stem cells have been applied for bone marrow transplant for 40 years, since the 1970's. I don't know how many lives have been saved but probably over 20,000 bone marrow transplants are done annually with bone marrow, peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood cells. These cells replace the patients' bone marrow hematopoeitic cells and the new stem cells completely replace their blood cells (as well as other cells that the bone marrow stem cells replenish). In recent years, umbilical cord blood has outstripped bone marrow as a source of hematopoietic stem cells and is now running neck-to-neck peripheral blood derived stem cells.

    The US FDA recently approved an adult mesenchymal stem cell line as a treatment of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). As you may know, this is a disease that occurs when one transplants bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood to replace the bone marrow but the transplanted cells decide the the host cells are "foreign" and beginning attacking them. This condition is very common, occurring in as many as 80% of patients who receive bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells and 40% of patients who receive umbilical cord blood. The lower incidence of GVHD is one of the reasons why cord blood is becoming more popular.

    Many clinical trials are underway to test the effects of bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells and other cells on the heart after a myocardial infarct or in a heart that failing for other reasons. A number of clinical trials have shown positive results but, to my knowledge, there is no specific cell that has yet been approved by either the US FDA or the Europe EMA for heart failure. Several trials have been carried out involving stem cells for stroke. I anticipate that one or more therapies will be approved for heart or brain in the coming year or two. Many companies are investing in these applications.

    Regarding the spinal cord, several companies are investing in trials for spinal cord injury: Stemcyte, Geron, Stem Cell Inc., NeuralStem, California Stem Cells Inc. and others. The trials are of course at their early stages right now but they should be heading into phase 2 and 3 trials in the coming year. Let us hope they encounter success and the investment continues.

    Wise.
    Dear Dr Wise

    It may be good to inform our forum members and guests that at present no stem cell treatment whatsoever applied to human SCI has yielded any scientifically proven achievments. Therefore all claims in my opinion should be considered anecdotal at best.
    My concern is that various threads posted on this forum and on the net in general may tend to an altered belief in otherwise. The fact that several companies are investing heavily and trials have just begun is good news indeed however I would like to stop my argument or any other at here.
    On the other hand I have nothing but great admiration towards all those who contribute their knowledge, time money in searching for a proven therapy



    Peter f

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    peterf,

    Stem cells have been applied for bone marrow transplant for 40 years, since the 1970's. I don't know how many lives have been saved but probably over 20,000 bone marrow transplants are done annually with bone marrow, peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood cells. These cells replace the patients' bone marrow hematopoeitic cells and the new stem cells completely replace their blood cells (as well as other cells that the bone marrow stem cells replenish). In recent years, umbilical cord blood has outstripped bone marrow as a source of hematopoietic stem cells and is now running neck-to-neck peripheral blood derived stem cells.

    The US FDA recently approved an adult mesenchymal stem cell line as a treatment of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). As you may know, this is a disease that occurs when one transplants bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood to replace the bone marrow but the transplanted cells decide the the host cells are "foreign" and beginning attacking them. This condition is very common, occurring in as many as 80% of patients who receive bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells and 40% of patients who receive umbilical cord blood. The lower incidence of GVHD is one of the reasons why cord blood is becoming more popular.

    Many clinical trials are underway to test the effects of bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells and other cells on the heart after a myocardial infarct or in a heart that failing for other reasons. A number of clinical trials have shown positive results but, to my knowledge, there is no specific cell that has yet been approved by either the US FDA or the Europe EMA for heart failure. Several trials have been carried out involving stem cells for stroke. I anticipate that one or more therapies will be approved for heart or brain in the coming year or two. Many companies are investing in these applications.

    Regarding the spinal cord, several companies are investing in trials for spinal cord injury: Stemcyte, Geron, Stem Cell Inc., NeuralStem, California Stem Cells Inc. and others. The trials are of course at their early stages right now but they should be heading into phase 2 and 3 trials in the coming year. Let us hope they encounter success and the investment continues.

    Wise.
    Thank-you Dr Wise

    Although I realise that stem cells in the SCI is just starting to be developed, into human trails, I found that the other areas of stem cell transfer that has a track record like the ones mentioned above to be very encouraging, positive and hopefull in what might be achived with stem cell and gene cell therapies in the future. ( hopfully sooner than later)

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by peterf View Post
    Dear Dr Wise

    It may be good to inform our forum members and guests that at present no stem cell treatment whatsoever applied to human SCI has yielded any scientifically proven achievments. Therefore all claims in my opinion should be considered anecdotal at best.
    My concern is that various threads posted on this forum and on the net in general may tend to an altered belief in otherwise. The fact that several companies are investing heavily and trials have just begun is good news indeed however I would like to stop my argument or any other at here.
    On the other hand I have nothing but great admiration towards all those who contribute their knowledge, time money in searching for a proven therapy



    Peter f
    Peterf,

    It is important that the good not be tarred and feathered with the bad. There are indeed a number of groups that are making unwarranted claims of stem cell benefit and low risk while selling unproven stem cell therapies to people. These include groups such as X-cells in Germany (now closed), Beike Biotech (in Shenzhen, China) and other places in China, Geeta Shroff (in Delhi) and other clinics in India, and various clinics in Mexico, Costa Rica, Carribean, and other places. Such places should be criticized for false advertising and charging for non-approved medical treatments.

    On the other hand, there are places that are working very hard to initiate clinical trials of stem cells. The problem with the way that you are phrasing the situation, it sounds as if you (or others) are pessimistic that the cells will have any beneficial effects. At least that is the how most people would interpret a statement that there is "no evidence...". I believe that we should be critical of clinics that are falsely claiming benefit where none has been proven and charging patients for the therapy. However, we should avoid issuing blanket statements that criticize all stem cell therapies.

    Wise.

  7. #7
    Wise, I think it is also important to state the successful therapies for other ailments besides spinal cord. Everyday there are articles on successes or beginning of successes for eyes, hearts, and others. Stem cells and their theraputic value is growing and will continue to grow.

  8. #8
    this month(June) Dr Robert Lanza and Advanced Cell Technology will inject human beings in the eye with hesc that they have created by using thier "single-cell blastomere” technique. they will be targeting two debilitating conditions that lead to blindness, Stargardt's Macular Dystrophy (SMD) and Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration (Dry AMD). dr lanza has said he expects results as soon as 6-8 weeks. by using non controversial hesc they plan on tackling many conditions. an interesting project they have in the pipeline is creating blood and the elusive O negative blood, patent is pending. maybe we could use there cells to produce whats needed to repair sci.

    heres a link to the best explanation on what the the "single-cell blastomere" science is. http://investorstemcell.com/forum/bl...erfeeed-33.htm

    Stargardt's Macular Dystrophy (SMD)
    http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/N...hnology&rank=1

    Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration (Dry AMD)
    http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/N...1345006&rank=1
    Last edited by ineedmyelin; 06-07-2011 at 11:57 AM. Reason: added link

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