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Thread: Wise or anyone else... Cortical Vision Impairment

  1. #1

    Wise or anyone else... Cortical Vision Impairment

    I have CP and my OT has been doing some visual testing (acuity, spatial ability, etc.) He told my mom I am the most complex patient (as far as vision goes) he has ever seen because I have actual visual problems, but I also have the neurological problems that present themselves as visiual.

    I have no depth preception because my eyes don't work together, I lack spatial ability big time, and my processing time is high because my vision is based A LOT on compensation. So here's my question, the spaitial issues are a neuro problem and because of them, I can't graph, have a very hard time with anything to do with angles (geometry, even straightening my hair), and I have issues with direction (don't know left from right).

    The problem is, we don't REALLY have a diagnosis because everyone is a bit baffled. It has been refered to a Spatial Learning Disability, but that's about it. I'm not looking for a DX, but is it possible tha Cortical Vision Impairment would cause these problems?

    WG

  2. #2
    Senior Member canuck's Avatar
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    You should probably see a Opthomologist to find out what's going on, anything else would be speculation.

  3. #3
    Senior Member canuck's Avatar
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    There are Neuropthomology Clinics in Vancouver
    http://www.neuroophthalmology.ca/UBC.../FrNOhome.html If you print that information out and take it to your family Doctor he'll be able to make a refferal.

  4. #4
    Jessica,

    Your visual cortex has specific areas that are designed to perceive things like angles and geometric figures. If your visual cortex was damaged or did not develop properly, the deficiencies of visual perception that you describe are possible. How is your reading and facial recognition?

    I find your mention of difficulty straightening your hair fascinating. It suggests that you may have some injuries to your superior parietal cortex as well [1]. Apparently, geometric recognition problems can also occur when facial recognition in normal, suggesting that the latter occurs elsewhere in the brain [2].

    Wise.

    1. Skakoon-Sparling et al. Impairments in tactile search following superior parietal damage. Brain and Cognition (2011) pp. online.
    2. Germine et al. A new selective developmental deficit: Impaired object recognition with normal face recognition. Cortex (2011) vol. 47 (5) pp. 598-607



    Quote Originally Posted by wheeliegirl2010 View Post
    I have CP and my OT has been doing some visual testing (acuity, spatial ability, etc.) He told my mom I am the most complex patient (as far as vision goes) he has ever seen because I have actual visual problems, but I also have the neurological problems that present themselves as visiual.

    I have no depth preception because my eyes don't work together, I lack spatial ability big time, and my processing time is high because my vision is based A LOT on compensation. So here's my question, the spaitial issues are a neuro problem and because of them, I can't graph, have a very hard time with anything to do with angles (geometry, even straightening my hair), and I have issues with direction (don't know left from right).

    The problem is, we don't REALLY have a diagnosis because everyone is a bit baffled. It has been refered to a Spatial Learning Disability, but that's about it. I'm not looking for a DX, but is it possible tha Cortical Vision Impairment would cause these problems?

    WG

  5. #5
    Facial recognition is good. I just recently saw an optho, but they don't have an actual DX for me, apparently.. Thanks Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Jessica,

    Your visual cortex has specific areas that are designed to perceive things like angles and geometric figures. If your visual cortex was damaged or did not develop properly, the deficiencies of visual perception that you describe are possible. How is your reading and facial recognition?

    I find your mention of difficulty straightening your hair fascinating. It suggests that you may have some injuries to your superior parietal cortex as well [1]. Apparently, geometric recognition problems can also occur when facial recognition in normal, suggesting that the latter occurs elsewhere in the brain [2].

    Wise.

    1. Skakoon-Sparling et al. Impairments in tactile search following superior parietal damage. Brain and Cognition (2011) pp. online.
    2. Germine et al. A new selective developmental deficit: Impaired object recognition with normal face recognition. Cortex (2011) vol. 47 (5) pp. 598-607

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Jessica,

    Your visual cortex has specific areas that are designed to perceive things like angles and geometric figures. If your visual cortex was damaged or did not develop properly, the deficiencies of visual perception that you describe are possible. How is your reading and facial recognition?

    I find your mention of difficulty straightening your hair fascinating. It suggests that you may have some injuries to your superior parietal cortex as well [1]. Apparently, geometric recognition problems can also occur when facial recognition in normal, suggesting that the latter occurs elsewhere in the brain [2].

    Wise.

    1. Skakoon-Sparling et al. Impairments in tactile search following superior parietal damage. Brain and Cognition (2011) pp. online.
    2. Germine et al. A new selective developmental deficit: Impaired object recognition with normal face recognition. Cortex (2011) vol. 47 (5) pp. 598-607
    Sort of reminds me of Oliver Sacks' classic book, "The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat" about visual agnosia.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by wheeliegirl2010 View Post
    Facial recognition is good. I just recently saw an optho, but they don't have an actual DX for me, apparently.. Thanks Wise.
    I should have expected that your facial recognition and reading is good. The latter is of course because you are participating so well on this site. The former is common. There is much evidence suggesting that facial recognition occurs in a more primitive part of the brain, perhaps the amygdala rather than the visual cortex. Apparently, animals without cortices are able to recognize faces.

    I am sure that there is some kind of diagnostic name for your condition but, to tell you the truth, they are only labels and every person is really his or her own syndrome. The brain is a truly amazing organ and capable of tremendous plasticity and flexibility. For that I am so grateful and it gives me much hope.

    Wise.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    I should have expected that your facial recognition and reading is good. The latter is of course because you are participating so well on this site. The former is common. There is much evidence suggesting that facial recognition occurs in a more primitive part of the brain, perhaps the amygdala rather than the visual cortex. Apparently, animals without cortices are able to recognize faces.

    I am sure that there is some kind of diagnostic name for your condition but, to tell you the truth, they are only labels and every person is really his or her own syndrome. The brain is a truly amazing organ and capable of tremendous plasticity and flexibility. For that I am so grateful and it gives me much hope.

    Wise.
    Thanks again, Wise,

    I asked my OT about this and he doesn't think I have it as I don't seem to have the symptoms. Anyways, he was doing this testing for the purpose of driving and later told me that he wouldn't be comfortable with me driving due to processes time being moderately (the first time he did the testing, severely) impaired. But, what prompted him to do the processing time test on paper again is that we did an obstacle course where I had to drive a scooter and point at things and say what they said and then do some actual driving i.e backing up, maneuvering tight spaces etc. and he said I did far better on that than he expected. Then I got my power chair and he told me that he can not explain with all my spatial difficulties why I drive it as well as I do, because I shouldn't be, and he told me it would take a long time and that I would probably have to drive a smaller car, but it seemed as though Anyways, do any of you know anyone how has perceptual/processing issues who drive? I will be calling a different rehab department as they do the actual testing for the driving and determine whether it is acceptable for me to a road test, but I worry that if they see I do badly with a non-practical assessment I will be getting a fair chance as it would appear I way better when things are practically applied.

    Thanks!

    WG

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by wheeliegirl2010 View Post
    Thanks again, Wise,

    I asked my OT about this and he doesn't think I have it as I don't seem to have the symptoms. Anyways, he was doing this testing for the purpose of driving and later told me that he wouldn't be comfortable with me driving due to processes time being moderately (the first time he did the testing, severely) impaired. But, what prompted him to do the processing time test on paper again is that we did an obstacle course where I had to drive a scooter and point at things and say what they said and then do some actual driving i.e backing up, maneuvering tight spaces etc. and he said I did far better on that than he expected. Then I got my power chair and he told me that he can not explain with all my spatial difficulties why I drive it as well as I do, because I shouldn't be, and he told me it would take a long time and that I would probably have to drive a smaller car, but it seemed as though Anyways, do any of you know anyone how has perceptual/processing issues who drive? I will be calling a different rehab department as they do the actual testing for the driving and determine whether it is acceptable for me to a road test, but I worry that if they see I do badly with a non-practical assessment I will be getting a fair chance as it would appear I way better when things are practically applied.

    Thanks!

    WG
    WG,

    I hope that you get your driver's licenses. In my opinion, everything else is a surrogate measure. The real and only measure of driving is a driving test in which you show them that you can safely handle the car in traffic and can understand the traffic laws.

    You are great.

    Wise.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    WG,

    I hope that you get your driver's licenses. In my opinion, everything else is a surrogate measure. The real and only measure of driving is a driving test in which you show them that you can safely handle the car in traffic and can understand the traffic laws.

    You are great.

    Wise.

    Thanks Wise!

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