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Thread: Dr. Young on Cloning & an Opposing View

  1. #21
    "I've found that while researchers have fields they like to stick to, when push comes to shove they design their work as much by what they think will be funded as by what they think will work".....James Kelly

    Now get this, if the Brownback bill passes, and "push comes to shove," a researcher will NEVER apply for funding for stem cell cloning, even if he thinks he it will work for something and even if he works for a private company. Even privately funded researchers will have to design their work away from stem cell cloning in order stay out of prison. AND THIS IS THE VERY THING JIM KELLY IS BITCHING ABOUT his statement above. If Mr. Kelly gets his way, even privately funded researchers will be thrown in jail for working on something they feel might be beneficial. I think the thinking of James Kelly is warped.

    James, I too, along with Bill and Carl await you answers. What about those research grants you "helped write" and the other questions. How about some answers?

  2. #22
    "I've found that while researchers have fields they like to stick to, when push comes to shove they design their work as much by what they think will be funded as by what they think will work".....James Kelly

    Now get this, if the Brownback bill passes, and "push comes to shove," a researcher will NEVER apply for funding for stem cell cloning, even if he thinks he it will work for something and even if he works for a private company. Even privately funded researchers will have to design their work away from stem cell cloning in order stay out of prison. AND THIS IS THE VERY THING JIM KELLY IS BITCHING ABOUT in his statement above. If Mr. Kelly gets his way, even privately funded researchers will be thrown in jail for working on something they feel might be beneficial. I think the thinking of James Kelly is warped.

    James, I too, along with Bill and Carl await your answers. What about those research grants you "helped write" and the other questions. How about some answers?[/QUOTE]

  3. #23
    Senior Member bill1938's Avatar
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    JAMES kelly said:
    "Point by point, I've followed Dr. Young's explanation with my reasons for opposing his position. I've then presented his open letter to President Bush and explained why I cannot accept its logic".

    This guy James Kelly is a fox in the chicken coop. Who is he to speak for our community? Who nominated him? He presented his minority views to Pres.Bush in
    opposition to Dr.Young's. 78% of us disagree completely with James Kelly. We
    should ignore his posts and not give him the recognition he needs.

    James Kelly views against Dr. Wise Youngs views is like a little league boy(Kelly)against a Major League Hall of Famer (Dr Young).

  4. #24
    Senior Member bill j.'s Avatar
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    Bill M and Wcrabtex are right. Our time can be better spent contacting Senators. Here is a direct link to contact Critical Senators. Do not underestimate the power of a letter, fax, or email. Take a little time and let your voice be heard in order to drown out the voices of the Jim Kelly's of the world. Let's all do what we can to get out of these chairs and to help people with other diseases, too.

    http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=15644

  5. #25
    " Scientific research and current medical therapies unquestionably reveal that adult stem cells are most promising research option. "

    by Dawn Vargo

    The debate over stem cell research is raging across the nation and echoing through chambers of Congress and state legislatures. Most people have heard just enough to offer an opinion to friends and neighbors; yet, the information they receive is incomplete and often inaccurate.
    Every new study on embryonic stem cells produces an onslaught of optimistic articles confidently proclaiming that with just a little more time and a lot more public money embryonic stem cells will provide cures for dozens of diseases and hope for millions of sick patients. Meanwhile, stories highlighting adult stem cell successes seem less optimistic and much less prominent. Casual observers might reasonably conclude that embryonic stem cells hold the most promise while adult stem cells are of secondary interest. They would be wrong.

    Embryonic stem cells are often touted as the most promising research option because they are a "blank slate" capable of differentiating (changing and specializing) into all the cells of the body. Less well known is that adult stem cells have the same ability to change into every kind of cell, tissue, and organ in the body. Yes, you read that correctly: one of the main reasons embryonic stem cells are flaunted as the gold standard in research is their ability to change into every cell type. Yet, adult stem cells have the same capacity.
    In other words, adult stem cells can do everything embryonic stem cells can do:

    1. Adult stem cells are flexible: Like embryonic ones, they can change into every cell type of the body. Rsearchers often refer to this ability to specialize into every cell type as pluripotency.

    2. Adult stem cells' flexibility show new potential to treat disease: Studies demonstrate that in addition to diseases already being treated with adult stem cells, the recently discovered and often ignored flexibility of adult stem cells offer additional possibilities to cure disease.

    Contrary to the exclusive claims of embryonic stem cell proponents, the following compilation of research demonstrates the flexibility of adult stem cells to transform into a wide range of specialized cells – just like embryonic ones.

    Bone Marrow Stem Cells to treat:
    Diabetes
    • Bone marrow stem cells transplanted into the pancreas can morph into insulin-producing beta islet cells. Insulin levels increased. This discovery may help treat people with Type 1 Diabetes by eliminating the need for daily injections of insulin.32
    • The discovery that bone marrow stem cells can change into insulin secreting cells is an important step toward curing diabetes.33
    Heart Damage
    • Bone marrow stem cells can help repair damaged heart muscle by helping the heart develop new, functional tissue.34
    • Bone marrow stem cells placed in damaged hearts (after a heart attack) improved the hearts' pumping ability by 80%.35
    • Bone marrow stem cells can help regenerate damaged heart tissue.36
    • Stem cells from bone marrow restored heart function and repaired damaged heart muscle by 50-75%.37
    • Bone marrow stem cells were used to treat heart disease with no abnormal cell growth.38
    • The process of human clinical trials is underway for patients with heart disease to be injected with bone marrow-derived stem cells during heart bypass surgery.39
    Liver Damage
    • Stress on the body can trigger adult stem cells to change into specialized cells that migrate to the damaged area and help repair the injury. For example, a damaged liver can send signals to bone marrow stem cells which respond by creating liver cells for the damaged liver.40
    Strokes and other neurodegenerative diseases
    • MAPCs can change into neuron-like cells in mice that have experienced strokes.41
    Brain Stem Cells to treat:
    Degenerative Conditions
    • Functioning neurons produced from adult brain stem cells provide potential to treat patients with Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, and Huntington's disease.42
    Cord Blood Stem Cells to treat:
    Cerebral Palsy
    • Injections of cold blood stem cells into 9-year-old twins with cerebral palsy increased their ability to speak, decreased their leg cramps and allowed them to sit up unassisted.43
    Hepatitis and Heart Damage
    • Patients suffering from hepatitis and heart injury can be treated with umbilical cord blood stem cell transplants.44
    Hurler's Syndrome
    • A young boy with Hurler's Syndrome was successfully treated with cord blood cells (as well as enzyme-replacement therapy).45
    Liver Regeneration
    • Cord blood stem cells have the capability to treat liver diseases.46
    • Umbilical cord blood stem cells from humans can change into liver cells in rats with damaged livers. 47
    • Human cord blood stem cells can improve liver renewal by transforming into liver cells that can aid in regeneration.48
    Fat Stem Cells to treat:
    Heart Damage
    • Stem cells from fat, called adipose-dreived stem cells, were able to repair and minimize heart damage.49
    Intestinal Stem Cells to treat:
    Diabetes
    • Adult stem cells from the intestine were converted into insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreases of diabetic mice.50
    Mesenchymal Stem Cells to treat:
    Acute Renal Failure
    • Mesenchymal stem cells (a specific type of adult stem cells) injected into kidneys demonstrated an almost immediate improvement in kidney function and cell renewal.51
    Cornea damage
    • Human mesenchymal stem cells were used to reconstruct damaged corneas.52
    Lung Injuries
    • Stem cells derived from bone marrow were found to be important for lung repair and protection against lung injury.53
    Neurodegenerative Diseases
    • Stem cells derived from bone marrow developed into neural cells that hold promise to treat patients with Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and spinal cord injuries 54
    Mouth Stem Cells to treat:
    Blindness
    • 8 out of 9 patients that had mouth stem cells placed in their eyes (cornea) recovered their sight.55
    Muscle Stem Cells to treat:
    Heart Disease
    • Muscle stem cells from thigh muscles were used to successfully treat four men with end-stage heart failure.56
    Incontinence
    • Human muscle stem cells have been used to cure urinary incontinence in animal models; human trials are now in progress.57
    Neural Stem Cells to treat:
    Multiple Sclerosis
    • Adult neural stem cells were unexpectedly found to treat an MS-like disease by suppressing the immune attacks that damage the brain and spinal cord tissues.58
    Spleen Stem Cells to treat:
    Diabetes
    • The spleen is a substantial source of stem cells and stem cell extracted from the spleen can change into insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells. This could yield a cure for Type 1 Diabetes.59
    Last edited by ASCRM; 12-30-2005 at 03:17 AM.
    EMBRACING THE POSSIBILITIES

  6. #26
    Holy thread resurrection Batman.

    ASCRM, while I understand your stance, none of this is completely proven in regenerative research for the spinal cord. You're almost comparing apples to oranges with the statements above regarding other uses of stem cells. If it were that easy, the cure would be here.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Pruett
    Holy thread resurrection Batman.

    ASCRM, while I understand your stance, none of this is completely proven in regenerative research for the spinal cord. You're almost comparing apples to oranges with the statements above regarding other uses of stem cells. If it were that easy, the cure would be here.
    Scott, this thread from 2001 does indeed pull out all sorts of memories for me. Back in 2001, we did not know as much about stem cells as we do now.

    What has happened in the intervening 4 years? First, I believe that we still do not know enough to shut the door to embryonic stem cell research. Second, although there has been progress in adult and umbilical cord blood stem cell research, I am disappointed that the United States has invested so little into getting more such stem cell therapies into clinical trials. Third, despite the promise of state funding for stem cell research, remarkably little has materialized. Both New Jersey and California have yet to spend significant amounts on such research. Nevertheless, we now know a lot more about both embryonic and adult stem cells and can make better predictions of the directions of the research and the likelihood of therapies.

    1. Adult stem cells and niches. It is now becoming generally accepted that adult stem cells interact with other cells in order to behave as stem cells. The places in tissues where they interact are called "niches". Given the right niche and the right signals from the tissues, adult stem cells will produce the appropriate kinds of cells or self-replicate. If the cells do not find a "niche", they will not survive in the tissue and contribute to its repair. It is clear from bone marrow and other work that it is important to clear existing stem cells from niches before implanted cells will engraft. This may be true of the brain and spinal cord as well.

    2. Embryonic stem cells. These cells have the capability of producing many different kinds of cells without interacting with any other kind of cell. After all, they come from the earliest stage of development where there are no or few other kinds of cells around. The risk that embryonic stem cells have a high propensity for tumors turned out to be clearly reduced if one pre-differentiates the embryonic stem cells before transplantation.

    3. Growth potential of stem cells. Embryonic stem cells continue to be the only stem cells that grown indefinitely. However, a number of laboratories have now reported that adult stem cells can be coaxed to divide for long periods of time. For example, it is possible to make umbilical cord blood stem cells grow for over 80 passages in culture, theoretically capable of yielding 1.2 x 10^24 cells.

    4. Creating stem cells. A number of genes have now been found to be asosciated or expressed only by stem cells. Also, several viral genes have been found to delay differentiation or maintain the "stemness" of stem cells for longer periods. Finally, some studies (particularly from Kevin Egan at Harvard) has shown that it is possible to fuse somatic cells with embryonic stem cells and produce embryonic-like stem cells with the somatic genes. While these are not yet at the stage of being usable for therapeutic development, these proof of concept studies are very encouraging and suggest that we will not need to harvest embryonic stem cells for all therapies in the future.

    There are still a number of very important unsolved problems in stem cell research. The first is the creation of immune-compatible cells for transplantation. There are currently only three ways of getting immune-compatible cells: autografts, creation of cloned cells, or HLA matching from a large and diverse inventory of banked cells. The idea of fusing somatic and stem cells to create immune-compatible stem cells is a very good one and should hlep solve this problem. The second is getting the cells to do the right thing after transplantation. It is now clear that many drugs and factors affect stem cell behavior. As more of these are discovered, we will have more and better tools to manipulate their behavior.

    At the same time, as we gain more experience with cell transplantation, it has become clear that we are expecting stem cells to do too much. Yes, they have the capability of making many different kinds of cells but that is not a desirable feature if they don't respond to or the signals are not present for them to make the right number and kinds of cells. In fact, to reduce the risk of inappropriate numbers or types of cells, we have to predifferentiate the cells. So, more and more attention is being paid to other kinds of cells for transplantation, cells that have well-defined behaviors and can do certain things for tissues. This is very likely to be the direction of cell therapy research in the coming years.

    Wise.

  8. #28
    To date, there are no clinical trials anywhere in the world using embryonic stem cells in humans. At the same time, adult stem cells are being used in treatment therapies for more than 70 diseases, including breast cancer, leukemia and sickle cell anemia. The most immediate and tangible hope for many patients isn't the fictional hype of embryonic stem-cell research but rather the safe, life-honoring stem cells derived from such sources as skin cells, bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. Not one of these adult stem-cell sources requires the destruction of human life.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Pruett
    Holy thread resurrection Batman.

    ASCRM, while I understand your stance, none of this is completely proven in regenerative research for the spinal cord. You're almost comparing apples to oranges with the statements above regarding other uses of stem cells. If it were that easy, the cure would be here.
    EMBRACING THE POSSIBILITIES

  9. #29
    It's good to hear Dr. Young talk like this. Reminds me when i read about Mr. Reeves.

    " Mr. Reeve apparently began to realize that embryonic stem cells were not the magic bullet he had assumed them to be. In one of his last interviews, appearing in the October 2004 issue of Reader's Digest, he said that embryonic-stem-cell research should still be pursued because "scientists should be free to pursue every possible avenue. It appears though, at the moment, that embryonic stem cells are effective in treating acute injuries and are not able to do much about chronic injuries." Far from claiming that this avenue offered "biological miracles," or was the best or only hope for patients like him, he now felt they were "not able to do much" for him.
    EMBRACING THE POSSIBILITIES

  10. #30
    2002 called. It wants its thread back.

    But seriously, I hope we're not having this same argument 4 years from now.

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