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Thread: Professor Mark Dallamore and his team have been licenced in Sri Lanka to surgically i

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post

    2. I personally have no interest in the chip implant for sci cures, but knowing about it and reading the article doesn't make me an advocate of that...
    Sure, I just wanted to make sure other readers get things right ;-)
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  2. #12
    this is email pr dallamore for me






    Patrick, firstly my apologies for not contacting sooner, i have been out of the country for some time.




    Dallamore Neuro Spinal Implant


    In cases of spinal cord injury, nerve impulses are still transmitted to the Central Nervous System but the damage to the spinal cord prevents the signals progressing past the trauma site to nerves. It is envisaged that this mechanism be simulated using an implanted prosthesis.

    We will conducting surgery to implant the prosthesis. The implant consists of a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), i.e. a microchip, will be connected to electrodes that are attached to
    specific nerves.

    Electrodes will be attached to the (CNS) Central Nervous System at a specific area and connected to the DSP, to electrodes attached that will be attached to other nerves located past the damaged area. The complete implant is designed to be placed fully in the body. After implantation, the patient will need physiotherapy and stimulation therapy to regain normal bodily functions and mobility.

    Unfortunately, I cannot provide any detailed information as I am sure you will appreciate that it is highly commercially sensitive.


    We are conducting the initial medical trials in the middle East.


    If you send me your medical files i will be able to inform you if we will be able to help you further.





    kindest regards



    professor Mark Dallamore
    JustaDollarPlease.org

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by fti View Post
    this is email pr dallamore for me






    Patrick, firstly my apologies for not contacting sooner, i have been out of the country for some time.




    Dallamore Neuro Spinal Implant


    In cases of spinal cord injury, nerve impulses are still transmitted to the Central Nervous System but the damage to the spinal cord prevents the signals progressing past the trauma site to nerves. It is envisaged that this mechanism be simulated using an implanted prosthesis.

    We will conducting surgery to implant the prosthesis. The implant consists of a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), i.e. a microchip, will be connected to electrodes that are attached to
    specific nerves.

    Electrodes will be attached to the (CNS) Central Nervous System at a specific area and connected to the DSP, to electrodes attached that will be attached to other nerves located past the damaged area. The complete implant is designed to be placed fully in the body. After implantation, the patient will need physiotherapy and stimulation therapy to regain normal bodily functions and mobility.

    Unfortunately, I cannot provide any detailed information as I am sure you will appreciate that it is highly commercially sensitive.


    We are conducting the initial medical trials in the middle East.


    If you send me your medical files i will be able to inform you if we will be able to help you further.





    kindest regards



    professor Mark Dallamore
    thank u fti,
    please inform us when you get more info. from him.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pakistan
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    1,168
    fti can u give his email address and contact numbers as i could write him too?

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    As interesting as the central pattern generator is, I dont believe in anyway that is will play a part in rehabilitation techniques if regenerative medicine continues to progress. Stepping is a nice story. Functional walking, no. This research should be mothballed by CDRF (if money is as tight as they claim) and focus should be switched to regenerative research for now.

    Feel free to look at the central pattern generator after you have cured paralysis Mr Edgerton.
    Fly_Pelican_Fly,

    I disagree for two reasons.

    First, central pattern generator stimulation (either with neurotransmitters or with electrical stimulation) can markedly improve locomotor function in people. This was first reported by Richard Herman at the Good Samaritan Hospital in Phoenix, who was able to convert a person who was just a household walker (i.e. took 160 seconds to walk 10 meters) to a functional walker (can walk a kilometer or more at normal speeds) by putting a stimulator in his spinal cord to lower the threshold for activation of walking. The stimulation itself did not activate walking but it allowed the person to activate the walking movement.

    Second, many people with the Brown-Sequard syndrome (where half of the spinal cord has been damaged) recover near-normal walking with both legs, even though motor control of one leg remains impaired and pain perception on the other leg is impaired. The reason why such people can walk is because the descending axons on one side can still activate the central pattern generator, which in turn activates steppiing motions in both legs. In other words, it is very iikely that the central pattern generator is the reason why >90% of people with incomplete spinal cord injuries recover unassisted locomotion with both legs within months, even though they have perhaps 10-20% of the axons crossing the injury site.

    Regeneration takes a long time and provide relatively few axons to the distal spinal cord. For people with "complete" spinal cord injury, regenerating the spinal cord is just converting them to "incomplete". Since 90% of people with incomplete injuries recover walking, I believe that the central pattern generator is the main reason why one of the low-hanging fruits of spinal cord injury therapies will be walking, why people can walk well with relatively few axons.

    Electrical stimulation of the CPG may not only convert incomplete people who are limited household walkers into functional walkers but also accelerate recovery in people, who are "complete" and then received regenerative therapies that have converted them to incomplete. In Vienna, they have shown that the CPG can be stimulated with patch electrodes placed on the skin (without having to use epidural electrodes). Rather than having to walk patients for 6 months or even a year, it may be possible for the patient to have functional locomotion after only 3 months of locomotor training. If so, this would be very worthwhile.

    By the way, I don't know Mark Dallamore or much about what he is doing. So, my post is not meant to endorse what he is doing. I am just saying that many very good investigators are studying CPG and CPG stimulation may very well accelerate locomotor recovery even if it does not stimulate regeneration. I would not be so quick to dismiss the work.

    Wise.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by peterf View Post
    I think we are grasping at straws here Manouli, why are all these breakthrough treatments and cures found in third world countries and kept secret.
    If there will ever be a real and reliable treatment it will be found closer to home believe me

    Peterf
    Peterf,

    Something similar has been done in the United States. Over a decade ago, John Herman in Phoenix implanted epidural electrodes in the lumbar cord and showed that stimulation of the CPG can markedly improve walking in a person with severe incomplete injuries from a limited household walker to one who can walk for kilometers at normal speed. This was published and discussed extensively here on CareCure. The community simply has not appreciated the importance of the finding and has not supported the research to push it forward.

    Wise.

  7. #17
    Patrick, firstly my apologies for not contacting sooner, i have been out of the country for some time.




    Dallamore Neuro Spinal Implant


    In cases of spinal cord injury, nerve impulses are still transmitted to the Central Nervous System but the damage to the spinal cord prevents the signals progressing past the trauma site to nerves. It is envisaged that this mechanism be simulated using an implanted prosthesis.

    We will conducting surgery to implant the prosthesis. The implant consists of a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), i.e. a microchip, will be connected to electrodes that are attached to
    specific nerves.

    Electrodes will be attached to the (CNS) Central Nervous System at a specific area and connected to the DSP, to electrodes attached that will be attached to other nerves located past the damaged area. The complete implant is designed to be placed fully in the body. After implantation, the patient will need physiotherapy and stimulation therapy to regain normal bodily functions and mobility.

    Unfortunately, I cannot provide any detailed information as I am sure you will appreciate that it is highly commercially sensitive.


    We are conducting the initial medical trials in the middle East.


    If you send me your medical files i will be able to inform you if we will be able to help you further.





    kindest regards



    professor Mark Dallamore
    JustaDollarPlease.org

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Fly_Pelican_Fly,

    I disagree for two reasons.

    First, central pattern generator stimulation (either with neurotransmitters or with electrical stimulation) can markedly improve locomotor function in people. This was first reported by Richard Herman at the Good Samaritan Hospital in Phoenix, who was able to convert a person who was just a household walker (i.e. took 160 seconds to walk 10 meters) to a functional walker (can walk a kilometer or more at normal speeds) by putting a stimulator in his spinal cord to lower the threshold for activation of walking. The stimulation itself did not activate walking but it allowed the person to activate the walking movement.

    Second, many people with the Brown-Sequard syndrome (where half of the spinal cord has been damaged) recover near-normal walking with both legs, even though motor control of one leg remains impaired and pain perception on the other leg is impaired. The reason why such people can walk is because the descending axons on one side can still activate the central pattern generator, which in turn activates steppiing motions in both legs. In other words, it is very iikely that the central pattern generator is the reason why >90% of people with incomplete spinal cord injuries recover unassisted locomotion with both legs within months, even though they have perhaps 10-20% of the axons crossing the injury site.

    Regeneration takes a long time and provide relatively few axons to the distal spinal cord. For people with "complete" spinal cord injury, regenerating the spinal cord is just converting them to "incomplete". Since 90% of people with incomplete injuries recover walking, I believe that the central pattern generator is the main reason why one of the low-hanging fruits of spinal cord injury therapies will be walking, why people can walk well with relatively few axons.

    Electrical stimulation of the CPG may not only convert incomplete people who are limited household walkers into functional walkers but also accelerate recovery in people, who are "complete" and then received regenerative therapies that have converted them to incomplete. In Vienna, they have shown that the CPG can be stimulated with patch electrodes placed on the skin (without having to use epidural electrodes). Rather than having to walk patients for 6 months or even a year, it may be possible for the patient to have functional locomotion after only 3 months of locomotor training. If so, this would be very worthwhile.

    By the way, I don't know Mark Dallamore or much about what he is doing. So, my post is not meant to endorse what he is doing. I am just saying that many very good investigators are studying CPG and CPG stimulation may very well accelerate locomotor recovery even if it does not stimulate regeneration. I would not be so quick to dismiss the work.

    Wise.
    Just to clarify, I have nothing against locomotor training to promote plasticity. But I do have doubts as to whether this modality is will be effective as training for regenerative strategies where finer motor control is the targeted outcome.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    Just to clarify, I have nothing against locomotor training to promote plasticity. But I do have doubts as to whether this modality is will be effective as training for regenerative strategies where finer motor control is the targeted outcome.
    Perhaps someday I will convince you otherwise, at least as far as the legs are concerned. I know many people who are walking after spinal cord injury. They can't tap dance or play soccer but they are walking and some are even running marathons. The locomotor training is not to achieve fine motor control. It is to condition the spinal cord so that some fibers reaching the central pattern generator can initiate and modulate walking activity.

    Although we have only data on 8 subjects in Hong Kong and 20 subjects in Kunming, our data suggests that if people don't undergo intensive locomotor training, they will not recover locomotor function after umbilical cord blood cell transplants. The data also suggests that intensive locomotor training is not necessary for regrowth of spinal tracts (since we see DTI evidence of the growth) but it is necessary for locomotor recovery.

    Wise.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Jawaid View Post
    fti can u give his email address and contact numbers as i could write him too?
    http://www.neurosciencenerveregenera...ultations.html

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