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Thread: The good news: Olfactory ensheathing glial cells from the nose regenerate the spinal cord

  1. #1

    The good news: Olfactory ensheathing glial cells from the nose regenerate the spinal cord

    See
    http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=36767

    This was the "good news" that I was referring to earlier.

    [This message was edited by Wise Young on Mar 05, 2002 at 07:13 PM.]

  2. #2
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    how is this good news?

    To tell you the truth, we have tried in our laboratory to do so but cannot grow the olfactory ensheathing glial cells from the nasal mucosa, not enough anyway for transplantation

  3. #3
    Well, they succeeded. We tried. Actually, many laboratories tried without succeeding. For example, at the University of Louisville, they tried to isolate olfactory ensheating glial (OEG) cells from the nasal mucosa of cadavers and was able to get stem cells but not OEG. This is why it is so important to have multiple laboratories working on a problem. Now, we will try again, hopefully learning from how they did it.

    The good news is that they are now the first to show that delayed (4 weeks) transplantation improves recovery in transected spinal cords.

    There is one caveat that I want to emphasize. The recovery is not all that great. The rats aren't walking. They are just moving their legs. So, it will be important to see what combination therapies work with this to improve the extent of regeneration.

    Nevertheless, if isolation of olfactory glial cells from the nasal mucosa can be confirmed in human, this provides a relatively non-invasive source of OEG cells. By the way, taking nasal mucosa would require minor surgery to cut some of the skin from the inside of the nose). The inside of the nose has quite a few bacteria and antibiotics would be necessary.

    I think that this will cut down substantially on the amount of time required to get OEG cells into clinical trials.

    Wise.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    dr young

    but you said their aren't enough of the oeg cells in the nose to transplant. what can be done about the lack of oeg?

    take a few oeg from the nose every few weeks and freeze them until enough?

    those stem cells in the nose turns into the oeg. find out which chremical turn the stem cell into the oeg.


    if i could just move my legs again, that would be the coolest thing in my life for the last 15 years.

  5. #5

    DA

    Please reread the good Doctor's posts. He said that his lab could not grow enough from the nasal mucosa, not that there were not enough OEGs in the nose. So now Dr. Young and his lab will try to duplicate the study. Very exciting.

    Dr. Young,

    Did your lab start preparing to repeat the experiment before the article was released? Or did you not have enough information at the time?

    -Steven

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    steve

    you lost me. what is it im not understanding?

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    DA

    The OEG cells from the nose are more differentiated and harder to grow so that's why Dr.Young didn't managed to grow enough cells for transplantation.
    And I don't know why you thought that the stem cells from the nose turned into OEG cells. Dr.Young said that the Universtity of Louisville tried to isolate OEG cells from the nose but only managed to get stem cells instead of OEG cells.

  8. #8

    The Good News

    Dr. Young,

    Well this was certainly worth the wait and really good news. Do you foresee or predict (in human clinical trials of OEG'S), using only the OEG'S or maybe coming up with a mixture of some sort to help the OEG'S do their thing ? Thanks. LJW

  9. #9
    Steven,

    Jike Lu in Australia (by the way, the work was his Ph.D. thesis and I posted a link to his thesis) used a novel approach to growing OEG. He took the olfactary lamina propia and either grew the OEG cells from those in culture (by placing whole pieces of them into culture and waiting for the OEG cells to migrate out) or actually transplanted the whole lamina propia tissue into the 3-4 mm space that he cut out when he transected the cord.

    OEG actually originate from the nasal mucosa and migrate up into the olfactory bulb. There should be plenty of OEGs in the olfactory mucosa. As I pointed out, we were not able to isolate and culture the cells from adults. Almudena Ramon-Cueto used olfactory bulbs as her source and we followed her example.

    One of the problems of cutting out a piece of nasal mucosa is the strong likelihood of bacterial infection of the culture (there are a lot of bacteria in our noses). I am not sure how he sterilized them because this was one problem that we had. I think that it has to do with the dissection technique. Lu does not mention antibiotic treatments.

    Wise.

    [This message was edited by Wise Young on Mar 05, 2002 at 11:09 PM.]

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    Dr.Young

    Do you think this procedure will make the chance to lose partial function of smell and taste lesser than when they have to remove one olfactory bulb?

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