Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Wise? nurse? do I need to be at a 90 degree angle for standing to be beneficial?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Indpls, IN USA
    Posts
    228

    Wise? nurse? do I need to be at a 90 degree angle for standing to be beneficial?

    I have a standing chair and am often in a partly standing position. Is bearing SOME weight helpful for my bones, or must I be standing straight up to have any benefit at all? Say I were to be as straight as possible (90 degrees to the ground) for half an hour, or halfway beween sitting and standing for an hour. I realize there is not an exact answer to my question -just need a general idea of how all this works...
    "courage is fear that has said its prayers"

  2. #2
    For me, I like to stand as straight as possible. I've put 1/2" blocks of wood between the stander and knee pads, Easystand Glider, to make my knees go back further putting me in a more upright position.. I've heard the 1/2 standing position really puts a strain on the thigh bones etc.

    I've been standing since I was injured 38 years ago. I think it is one of the reasons I am so healthy. What kind of stander are you using. Way to go on using one.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by jennypenny View Post
    I have a standing chair and am often in a partly standing position. Is bearing SOME weight helpful for my bones, or must I be standing straight up to have any benefit at all? Say I were to be as straight as possible (90 degrees to the ground) for half an hour, or halfway beween sitting and standing for an hour. I realize there is not an exact answer to my question -just need a general idea of how all this works...
    In my opinion, weight-bearing is important for maintenance of bone and joints. However, it has been difficult to prove. Various studies suggest that just standing an hour a day 3 days a week doesn't do much to prevent the loss of bone that occurs in people with spinal cord injury. Unfortunately, there have been few studies of longer weight-bearing done on an every day basis.

    If you are vertical, of course, your legs are bearing the your full weight. If you are at a 45 degree angle, your legs is bearing only half of your body weight. There is no evidence concerning how much weight bearing is necessary and sufficient for rebuilding the bone. Much of what we know in this area comes from studies of people and animals that have gone into space. In microgravity (where there is little or no weight bearing), astronauts show bone loss that is very similar to what happens to people with spinal cord injury. It takes a long time (many months) for astronauts to recover their bone densities even when they are weight-bearing many hours per day.

    http://www.szsbetter.com/download/li...cosmonauts.pdf

    Wise.

  4. #4
    As Wise said, there is little evidence (although there have been many studies done) that show that passive standing (weight bearing) alone does any to either prevent or improve osteoporosis in those with SCI. It is still a good idea for other reasons though, including your skin, range of motion, spasticity control, and bowel motility.

    Most of the studies that have been done, or are ongoing, about osteoporosis treatment and prevention in SCI indicate that active muscle contraction is an important factor. It appears that the way that contracting muscle stress the bones while weight bearing is an important factor. FES and standing on a vibration plate hold a lot of promise in this area.

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    For me, I could give a heck about the scientific studies and what they prove. I just love the feeling of standing, stretching and feeling the organs move into their proper places. Kissing my wife at eye level is motivation for me. I've been standing for almost 38 years and have never broken a bone due to osteo. or bone thinning.

    I've also started riding the fes bike 2'xs, doing 14miles total, per week. I trust that just the stimulaton alone wil keep the legs and muscles energized and my cardio up to speed, no pun intended. I'm 62 yr old now and have 136 miles so far this year, the younguns also riding have maybe 46 at most. I love giving them the raz about when they get older they can be strong like me.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA
    Posts
    589
    My question is, if using a standing frame is not beneficial for bone density in a SCI patient, what is? If an incomplete injury has the potential to use those legs what can be done while ortho issues and muscle strength are improving so that walking is possible?

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    516
    Are vibrating plates commercially available? I supposed I wouldn't be able to use one in my apartment, though, since I do have downstairs neighbors. A plate that one could stand on while in the standing frame would be great.

Similar Threads

  1. Wise/SCI Nurse - HELP please!
    By Claire in forum Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-18-2011, 06:34 PM
  2. Pee standing up? SCI nurse...
    By BRASWELLF5 in forum Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-17-2010, 02:40 AM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-08-2009, 01:44 PM
  4. standing & leaking...connection? help, Nurse!
    By jennypenny in forum Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-02-2005, 09:43 PM
  5. Standing frame duration question for SCI nurse
    By GI Matt in forum Exercise & Recovery
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-16-2004, 10:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •