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Thread: Power Chairs vs manual chairs for Paras : opinions, experience?

  1. #21
    "NW-Will,"
    As I predicted, you got opinions form "rah!rah! to practical. The bottom line for you is do what suits you and what you need and want to do. It is your life to live and enjoy.

    All the best,
    GJ

  2. #22
    THanks John, I don't regret doing what I did for all these years and thankfully still do what is nec. to maximize my potential. I ws fortunate that I was involved with very active people and a good sp orts program when i went thur rehab. Rick Hansen, Terry Fox, Gene Reimer, Stan Stronge; we all pushed each other. I feel blessed for the opprotunities I had.

    I Can still handcycle which was my main concern and continue to workout in the gym with a trainer, proper form and function is esstential and at home.

    I really don't consider anyone as a slck lazy ass; more likely they are just someone who is not physically inclined to be active. Not my place to judge, but continue to encourage them to get ut there and move. It doesn't take much, can be as little as a few rubber strength bands to do a full work out; upper and lower body.

    Stay strong buddy and good luck in Cleveland.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    In an ideal world, everyone should have both. Unfortunately, our current system discourages development of the types of mobility equipment that would represent "the right tools for the job".

    I sincerely hope one of the major manufacturers takes a serious look at patherat's ZX1.

    A purpose-specific para powerchair would be an intriguing concept. Something like a lightweight P222SE. Quickie is content to simply continue offering the P222 in its current form until there is no longer any demand for it.

    Take the basic P222SE concept, reduce the footprint with a different front frame/hanger design, design it for a weight capacity to 265 lbs., eliminate the need to make it compatible with power seating, power it with Lithium ion batteries, and include a detachable joystick that would allow it do be driven remotely onto a lift or ramp...

    ...Needless speculation. It will never happen.
    The companies seem hooked to lead-acid batteries and will not let go. That is where the weight and bulk come from. Not just the battery but the heavy frame needed to support it. I am assuming that it is a cost issue, but I wonder if it is real. If not lithium, NiMH are a much better alternative and the price of them has dropped considerably. I have to believe that Medicare idiocy enters into the equation somehow. It pains me to see people struggling to maneuver those wheelchair equivalents of an 18 wheeler around when they could be riding around in the equivalent of a 52 lb. iGlide with a joystick.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  4. #24
    Senior Member Timaru's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    Some guys give you the “use it or lose it” bit about the shoulders, but that is without foundation. If you are not using your hands and arms for wheeling, you are still going to be using them for their intended purpose. They did not evolve.to endure use as legs, do transfer activities, etc.
    How I wish physiotherapists had grasped this concept back in the 1970s!

    Even us quads were supposed to push around in chrome plated E&J folding chairs weighing in at ~ 50 lbs. because of the good it was doing us.

    Oh! My aching shoulders!

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    and continue to workout in the gym with a trainer, proper form and function is esstential and at home.
    I am so jealous wish I had a trainer..if you know of any in SFL--let me know..

    I had to go to a power assist for a few years..because of serious over use issues..I worked full time and my job required a lot of travel..

    But eventually things calmed down (solution to overuse--don;t use ) but I was getting heavier..went to 148!! I got my new chair..pics in my profile! and now I am back to 128! and getting my nice arms back again.

    That power assist chair is in the garage..IF I ever hurt myself again..I am blessed to have it...but I hope not to have to for a LOONNNG time.

    However that being said..I probably couldnt push independantly as much as I would need to if I didn;t have my husband to help me when we are traveling etc..and outside my comfort zone..so..it works for me as I have a break when I need it..

    so if I had to go downtown and go up horrible justice building ramp and dangerous ramps in street alone...would I just charge up and hop back in my power assist? I guess I would have to..
    Last edited by sherocksandsherolls; 03-31-2011 at 01:33 PM.
    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castaneda

  6. #26
    Senior Member flicka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    I really don't consider anyone as a slck lazy ass; more likely they are just someone who is not physically inclined to be active. Not my place to judge, but continue to encourage them to get ut there and move. It doesn't take much, can be as little as a few rubber strength bands to do a full work out; upper and lower body.
    Thank you! I was not into sports as an AB, so it was kind of depressing at first when everyone tried to encourage me with all the activities available for "us people". I was in great physical shape, but it was from work, not workouts. My exercise consisted of 10 sit-ups each morning. Now, I spend more in energy getting out of bed. Instead of a few rubber strength bands, I pull wet Levis out of the washer. I'm still in pretty good shape for 'a mature woman'.
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  7. #27
    Senior Member brucec's Avatar
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    I never tried a power chair, c7 complete, 33 years.
    one might come in handy doing yardwork when you're carrying something, but i figured the manual one helps me active and fit.
    We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
    Ronald Reagan

  8. #28
    I have a progressive neuro disease, so I spent years as a para, and am now a quad.

    I really loved my manual chair. I kept mine for a year and a half after I could use it in vague hopes of some kind of remission. Even places that weren't properly accessible, I could transfer to the stairs, throw my wheelchair up the stairs or pull it up with a cord, and get back in at the top. I could go to a restaurant with a step or two without major fuss, or fit in small bathrooms. I could go to parties at my extended families houses.

    Now I can't hold up my head or sit up long, and I need a powerchair. I have a Permobil c300 and I like it. It is pretty compact, fully featured, and fits well. But it isn't the same at all. Me and it together weigh about 450 lbs... I can't go into that restaurant with just two steps, and that makes for a lot of awkward moments. I have one family member's house that I can get into and I haven't see a thanksgiving a few years. I need a wheelchair van. Plus, there's just something about manual wheeling... I remember the first time I was going to miss a long light in my PWC, and realizing that I was at max speed, there simply was no faster to go. I couldn't even TRY to rush. It's a whole 'nother step away from walking, that way. It is less physically pleasing on the whole.

    Overall, if I'd had a powerchair early, I don't think I would have used it much. But if you're not progressive, you have to think of your shoulders. Imagine when you'd use it, and if that's a few times a week, go for it.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Timaru View Post
    How I wish physiotherapists had grasped this concept back in the 1970s!

    Even us quads were supposed to push around in chrome plated E&J folding chairs weighing in at ~ 50 lbs. because of the good it was doing us.

    Oh! My aching shoulders!
    I used that same chair for 12 years after my accident till my shoulder's started hurting then my SCI doctor told me I needed a electric chair.
    I can do so much more in electric chair and my shoulder stoped hurting about a year later.
    As far as exercise you get plenty if you do r pressure relief every 15 minutes for 30 seconds plus all the tranfers you do in a day.
    I still use that old e&j since it is still the only chair I can bend over and and do things without the bars hitting my legs and cause a sore.
    I tried different chair with a pt and they cannot find me a chair that when you bend over will not cause my legs from hitting the bars.
    Since when I bend over my legs like to go outwards and pt said the e&j was still the best chair for not doing this.
    This was about 5 years ago when I got my new electric chair.
    Rule is shoulder's start to hurt time for electric as told to me by SCI.
    Chairs are replaceable r shoulder are not.
    If you can go 50 years in a manual without shoulder pain go for it.
    We are all different.
    If I use my manual today for more than a few days my shoulders just kill me.
    I think its more of the same motion over and over with the pressure that kills me.
    If I go backwards it does not bother me....so if you see someone going backwards in there chair its me.....lmao.

    Art
    Art

  10. #30
    Senior Member bigtop1's Avatar
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    With the e-motion M 15 battery powered wheels, I have the best of both worlds. I propel the w/c with the use of my arms but, can adjust them to the needs of my arms. I wouldn't have anything else. Plenty of range with the battery power, am able to keep a normal w.c. to get into tight spots, etc. I love it. I am 67 years old, T 11 para. Post 2.5 years.
    I refuse to tip toe through life, only to arrive safely at death.

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