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Thread: Down syndrome - new prenatal tests

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Saranoya View Post
    You're right, orangejello. There's no difference. If abortion is legal, that implies the parents can always choose to terminate the pregnancy, no matter what the reason.

    That being said, there's an extra dimension in play when we are talking about a child with a known genetic defect. The fact that the child has this defect (in this case, Down's Syndrome) might prompt some people to abort a pregnancy they wouldn't otherwise have aborted.

    So the question then becomes: is it ethical to make it 'trivial' for parents to find out whether or not their child has a genetic defect before it's born.
    It is problematic to use the word "trivial" when it comes to genetic testing. I suspect any parent undergoing genetic testing does so with a great deal of turmoil about the potential results. I honestly don't see that making the genetic testing easier to obtain or less invasive physically is going to change the emotional toll it extracts both in terms of just undergoing testing and in making a decision to terminate the pregnancy or not. It's true that easier testing will probably encourage more people to have it done. But personally I believe parents should have a say in whether they feel equipped emotionally and otherwise to go ahead a pregnancy of a disabled child. I would never judge somebody for deciding to terminate.
    Last edited by orangejello; 03-13-2011 at 07:24 PM.

  2. #12
    As somebody who has Spina Bifida I would support my brother and sister in law in a decision either way. Me having Spina Bifida puts them at a higher risk for having a child with a neural tube defect.

    I'm all for testing, if the testing comes back less then favourable it gives the parents and medical staff more time to discuss options and be prepared unlike when I was born there was no ultrasounds or any other testing.

    I think I might have been more on edge then his parents until all the tests and ultrasound results came back fine. They have a healthy happy almost two years old baby boy.
    Formerly Canuck but lost my password and changed e-mails because of a move.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Kris's Avatar
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    We are talking about human life here, not whether parents "feel" equipped to deal with it. No one "feels" equipped - you rise to the challenge. If anyone asked anyone here before injury if they felt equipped to hand it the answer might have been no. I think think this world is going to get difficult for disabled people. Oh wait there might not be any left if we abort them all. Then this world will be a great place for all the perfect people.

  4. #14
    Senior Member canuck's Avatar
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    I know this will be weird but I just got my old Canuck account back, the point I was making is that I think that knowing ahead of time allows for a better outcome, not only with the pyschological adjustment for the parents but it also also for better care for the baby, instead of the "we have a problem" at the time of birth that was experienced in my mothers era, todays knowledge in my brothers era would have allowed for the option of in utero surgery to just having the Neurosurgeon & O.R. ready to go close the babies back right at the delivery instead of a unprepared mad scramble to organise things and make decisions.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Kris View Post
    We are talking about human life here, not whether parents "feel" equipped to deal with it. No one "feels" equipped - you rise to the challenge. If anyone asked anyone here before injury if they felt equipped to hand it the answer might have been no. I think think this world is going to get difficult for disabled people. Oh wait there might not be any left if we abort them all. Then this world will be a great place for all the perfect people.
    If we are talking about an embryo within the age range where abortion is legally allowed, your own personal definition of "human life" is not really relevant to somebody making the choice to maintain or terminate a pregnancy.

    I am not advocating that women abort fetuses with disabilities. But I do support their right to make that choice.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Kris View Post
    Oh wait there might not be any left if we abort them all. Then this world will be a great place for all the perfect people.
    I think this is the perfect example of the kind of thing the 'slippery slope' might lead to. Because how do you define 'perfect'? Right now it's kids with Down's Syndrome who fall short, in fifty years it might be those who need glasses. That's a good reason to oppose the idea that it is somehow more (or less) acceptable to abort a pregnancy when you know the child has a genetic defect than when you don't.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kris View Post
    No one "feels" equipped - you rise to the challenge.
    True. However, some people throw themselves into it with an open mind and a willingness to take on whatever life throws at them, even if they know it's going to be hard, and that some days will be better than others. Others find themselves incapable of doing that, for whatever reason. It's those people -- the ones who are emotionally ill-equipped to take on a huge challenge like that in a healthy way -- who would likely do more damage than good to their child if they were forced to raise it.
    Last edited by Saranoya; 03-13-2011 at 08:50 PM.

  7. #17
    It is not only the Downs, it is the spina bifida too. It seem like the world only want perfect people.

    I am not against abortion but I feel bad every time I hear about the people who abort the babies with spina bifida too. Does it means that the people with a SCI is of not value.
    TH 12, 43 years post

  8. #18
    Senior Member Kris's Avatar
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    Hitler was leading the way 70 years ago. He sent trucks around to kill disabled people of all ages.

  9. #19
    Senior Member flicka's Avatar
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    I was exposed to rubella when I was in my first trimester with my third child. At the time, they said I should be tested to see if I had a mild case because it would cause problems with the fetus. The only other recommendation was abortion. I decided against it and my daughter was born without any problems.

    I would not want to have been born disabled. That's all I can say.
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  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Kris View Post
    Hitler was leading the way 70 years ago. He sent trucks around to kill disabled people of all ages.
    This isn't a question of state-sponsored murder. Whether you like it or not, it comes down to each individual woman's right to choose if she will or will not bring a (possibly) severely disabled child into the world. I agree that it's a potentially slippery slope and raises some uncomfortable questions about the value of disabled life, but I like to give women a little credit by assuming that very few would make this choice glibly or with superficial concerns.

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