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Thread: New model predicts walking after spinal cord injury

  1. #1

    New model predicts walking after spinal cord injury

    NEW MODEL PREDICTS WALKING AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY
    07 March 2011

    Scientists have developed a simple model which predicts which patients will walk unaided after spinal cord injury and which will need assistance.

    Researchers from Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center in the Netherlands combined age, motor function and touch sensitivity in spinal injury patients to work out which would walk again.

    The study, published online in the Lancet, found that the model was more accurate and less consuming than the AIS grading system.

    more....

    http://www.seriousinjurylaw.co.uk/ne...nal-injury.php

  2. #2
    Neurology
    Rule Can Predict Walking Outcomes After Spinal Cord Injury
    By: MICHELE G. SULLIVAN, Internal Medicine News Digital Network




    A new algorithm based on age and sensory and motor scores in four body areas may allow clinicians to predict with great accuracy which patients will be able to walk independently 1 year after spinal cord injury.

    "We have developed a simple clinical prediction rule ... that can be used by physicians to counsel patients with traumatic spinal cord injury and their families during the initial phase after injury," Dr. Joost van Middendorp and his coauthors wrote in the March 4 online issue of the Lancet.

    The rule, which "can predict a patient’s long-term probability of walking independently more accurately than ... the widely used AIS [American Spinal Injury Association/International Spinal Cord Society] grading system," was developed and validated in 492 trauma patients who were treated at 19 centers across Europe, according to Dr. van Middendorp of St. Radboud University Nijmegen (the Netherlands) and his coauthors (Lancet 2011 [doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62276-3]).

    The authors extracted data for their prediction algorithm from the European Multicenter Study on Human Spinal Cord Injury. The study included neurologic and functional status of 1,282 patients aged 18 years or older who had sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury and were treated and assessed according to each facility’s protocol at 15 days, and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post injury.

    Of the entire cohort, 118 had 6-month outcomes and 374 had 1-year outcomes available. Most of the patients were men (77%), with an average age at injury of 44 years. The AIS grade was A in 49%; B in 13%; C in 16%; and D in 22%. Of these 492 patients, 200 (41%) were able to walk independently after the injury.

    continue....

    http://www.internalmedicinenews.com/...e94a47171.html

  3. #3
    It is interesting that I asked an exam question about the percentage of people expected to walk independently after spinal cord injury last month. I asked whether the number was closer to 0%, 25%, 50%, or 75%. The correct answer on the exam was 50%. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Neurology
    Rule Can Predict Walking Outcomes After Spinal Cord Injury
    By: MICHELE G. SULLIVAN, Internal Medicine News Digital Network




    A new algorithm based on age and sensory and motor scores in four body areas may allow clinicians to predict with great accuracy which patients will be able to walk independently 1 year after spinal cord injury.

    "We have developed a simple clinical prediction rule ... that can be used by physicians to counsel patients with traumatic spinal cord injury and their families during the initial phase after injury," Dr. Joost van Middendorp and his coauthors wrote in the March 4 online issue of the Lancet.

    The rule, which "can predict a patient’s long-term probability of walking independently more accurately than ... the widely used AIS [American Spinal Injury Association/International Spinal Cord Society] grading system," was developed and validated in 492 trauma patients who were treated at 19 centers across Europe, according to Dr. van Middendorp of St. Radboud University Nijmegen (the Netherlands) and his coauthors (Lancet 2011 [doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62276-3]).

    The authors extracted data for their prediction algorithm from the European Multicenter Study on Human Spinal Cord Injury. The study included neurologic and functional status of 1,282 patients aged 18 years or older who had sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury and were treated and assessed according to each facility’s protocol at 15 days, and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post injury.

    Of the entire cohort, 118 had 6-month outcomes and 374 had 1-year outcomes available. Most of the patients were men (77%), with an average age at injury of 44 years. The AIS grade was A in 49%; B in 13%; C in 16%; and D in 22%. Of these 492 patients, 200 (41%) were able to walk independently after the injury.

    continue....

    http://www.internalmedicinenews.com/...e94a47171.html

  4. #4
    Wise, do you believe this algorithm should be used as a basis to council patients post-injury? Isnt it better to simply admit it is impossible to know?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    Wise, do you believe this algorithm should be used as a basis to council patients post-injury? Isnt it better to simply admit it is impossible to know?
    I agree; this makes real sense.
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    NEW MODEL PREDICTS WALKING AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY
    07 March 2011

    Scientists have developed a simple model which predicts which patients will walk unaided after spinal cord injury and which will need assistance.

    Researchers from Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center in the Netherlands combined age, motor function and touch sensitivity in spinal injury patients to work out which would walk again.

    The study, published online in the Lancet, found that the model was more accurate and less consuming than the AIS grading system.

    more....

    http://www.seriousinjurylaw.co.uk/ne...nal-injury.php
    Funny, my university! I'm a grad student medical biology at the radboud university

  7. #7
    My concern would be that this model would be used to dtermine the type and quality of rehab a person gets.

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