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Thread: For all of us in this community, please read and give your response.

  1. #1
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    For all of us in this community, please read and give your response.

    As quoted from Johns Hopkins Press's "SCI- A Guide for Living." Published in 2000 no less-

    "Spinal cord regeneration presents some huge scientific hurdles. Although exciting and promising research is going on right now, we are far from solving these problems. On the other hand, it is reasonable and appropriate to believe that the solutions will eventually be found. Given the fast pace of progress in medical research, we might be tempted to believe that success is just around the corner. The reality is not so encouraging. It willv probably be many years before full regeneration of the damages spinal cord becomes possible, PERHAPS A HUNDRED YEARS OR MORE. Certainly, we can expect improvements in spinal cord recovery in our lifetimes, but these improvements will most likely be small. A MAJOR BREAKTHROUGH IN THIS AREA in the next several decades is unlikely."

    and people wonder why I'm so negative! What happens when a young, bright researcher, planning his or hers area of interest, reads this. They'll move into a seperate direction. These writers work in an institution which I believed was on the cutting edge of spinal research.

  2. #2
    Senior Member rdf's Avatar
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    You have to remember that this is an opinion, only. They have no credibility saying such a thing, as far as I'm concerned, unless it's the tired old mantra of not giving false hope.

    There are others, although fewer in number, who believe the cure is within our grasp, now, not in the future, such as Dr. Young and those with similar beliefs. These of the latter ilk are respected just as much if not more than those at Johns Hopkins.


    "A MAJOR BREAKTHROUGH IN THIS AREA in the
    next several decades is unlikely."

    Depends on what they mean by "major," but this has been proven wrong already, so don't put too much faith in a release by the PR dept., which is written to garner more funding for research just as much as it is written for anything else.
    -bob

  3. #3
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    I guess these authors are just physical therapists, but from Johns Hopkins, for heaven's sake

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    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Chris, is there an author's name given? I see several docs at Hopkins and this is NOT the majority view point there.

  5. #5
    I believe they are mistaken in thinking they can predict time periods but as I'm no expert my opinion is meaningless!

    If full, anatomically perfect spinal cord repair was required (as they suggest) we might be in more trouble than we are! I have been convinced by Wise Young and others that it is possible for our injury site still to be an apparent jumbled mess but for the patient to function normally and be unaware of this. Indeed that happens now - if scientists can work out why certain people can function normally then they be able to help the rest of us.

    Wise Young has told us on this forum that 50% of us should be able to walk from the 1st phase of treatments.

    Geoffrey Raisman has personally told me that anyone who predicts that it is impossible for there to be a treatment for SCI in the near future is not aware of all the facts. (But equally someone who thinks they know exactly when it will happen is equally mistaken)

    Chris

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    Senior Member bilby's Avatar
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    That sounds familiar. When I was first hurt, my doctor would say almost the same thing, "you'll never walk again. not in your life time."

    I can understand that kind of talk and mindset 15 years ago, but hearing it now is really discouraging.

    "All hope abandoned, he who enters here." Dante

    bill

    [This message was edited by bilby on January 23, 2002 at 01:59 PM.]

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    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    rdf

    its not just an opinion. it is an opinion coming out of a very prestiges medical center. and when they pound over and over and over and over such negative unfound views. nobody will fund research for a lost cause, no company will invest, researchers scared to go to human trials will be more scared, the sci community cure haters will have and feel more power.

    what we should do is force them to publcally apologize and take back those words. if they really feel 100+ years is right, they can feel it in private.

  8. #8

    This Statement

    Sounds like something that blond ape Scientist (can't remember his name) from the planet of the apes would say.

    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  9. #9
    Senior Member mattblan's Avatar
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    What was your motivation for posting this?

  10. #10
    Chris, DA, and others:

    We can look on the bright side and conclude that in 2000, a doctor at Johns Hopkins acknowledged that a cure will eventually occur. They use to say "never". Now, it is no longer if but when.

    As a community, we must understand that there are strong pessimists who believe that a cure is a long time away. We have all met them, doctors who believe that we are far from a cure. There is no use pretending that such people do not exist. They are present in many medical institutions including Johns Hopkins.

    We should also understand that there are many scientists and doctors who believe that a cure will happen much earlier. Of course there is a range of opinion concerning when, but, believe me, scientists like myself would not be working on the problem if we felt that it will not occur within our lifetime. By the way, I am over 50 and do not plan to work on spinal cord injury longer than I have to.

    Wise.

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