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Thread: Retrodifferentiation

  1. #1
    Senior Member cementhead's Avatar
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    Retrodifferentiation

    OK,I talked to a company out of Pakistan that says they are doing treatments to people with SCI.There treatment involves a patented procedure called Retrodifferentiation.
    This patent is owned by a company called Tristem based out of U.K.

    There are some older posts on this subject.
    WILL YOU GUYS EDUCATE ME PLEASE

  2. #2
    Hey Cementhead,

    Which company did you contact?

    From here:

    IV. Pluripotent Stem Cells via Somatic Cell Dedifferentiation

    A quite different route to the production of pluripotent stem cells would be to reprogram differentiated somatic cells so as to restore to them the pluripotency typical of embryonic stem cells. The obstacles here are not ethical, but technical. Because it involves neither the creation nor the destruction of human embryos, the common ethical objection to human embryonic stem cell research would not apply. But it would take new scientific advances and new technological innovation before such "dedifferentiation" of somatic cells back into pluripotent stem cells could be achieved. Several suggestions have, however, been offered for how such dedifferentiation might be achieved, and the value of success cannot be overstated. For if it were possible to undo the differentiation of somatic cells, running development in reverse back to the state of pluripotency, it would in principle be possible for autologous pluripotent stem cells to be obtained from the body of any human being. Such individualized stem cells would then be available as a potential source of personalized, immuno-compatible regenerative therapies.

    ...

    B. Is It Scientifically Sound?

    Research into dedifferentiation of somatic cells is at a preliminary stage, and it is much too early to know whether this will succeed. It may prove possible to culture specific populations of somatic cells-cells that may be especially susceptible to dedifferentiation-under conditions that might get them to reverse their differentiating epigenetic changes, thereby leading them to become more multipotent or even completely pluripotent; there is also some hope of identifying and isolating the chemical factors present in oocytes and other cells (such as ESCs) that are responsible for maintaining or restoring cells to pluripotency, and of using these chemicals to dedifferentiate ordinary somatic cells (without the further need for oocytes or embryos).

    In nature, limited dedifferentiation is involved in the regeneration of missing limbs in amphibians, though the precise mechanism is not yet known.32 Studies have shown that some adult human somatic cell types (blood, liver, muscle) can be chemically dedifferentiated back into their corresponding multipotent progenitor cells (that is, adult stem cells).33 Several research laboratories have reported the direct isolation of cells from bone marrow of children or adults that, when cultured in vivo, have or acquire the capacity to differentiate into many mature cell types, including cells originating from all three embryonic germ layers.34 These cultured human multipotent cells also show the presence of certain biochemical properties ordinarily found only in human embryonic stem cells. It is interesting to speculate that it may be the same bone marrow stem cells, cultured in vitro under different conditions, that revert in some cases to (rather modestly multipotent) mesenchymal stem cells, in some other cases (further back) to the clearly multipotent adult progenitor cells, and in still other cases (yet to be achieved) to the ur-primordial stem cell, the fully pluripotent stem cell, functionally equivalent to an embryonic stem cell (though not of embryonic origin). If such "graded dedifferentiations" are indeed the cause of the variations seen among the cultivated stem cells now known to arise from bone-marrow stem cells, further research-using also stem cells obtained from umbilical cord blood-might very well turn out to yield the big payoff: fully pluripotent stem cells, obtainable at will and altogether without any involvement of embryos-and well suited for autologous transplantation.

    Another possible approach to somatic cell dedifferentiation relies on knowledge that might be gained through cloning-for-biomedical-research. In SCNT or cloning, a somatic cell nucleus is reprogrammed back to totipotency by transfer into an enucleated oocyte. Presumably, cytoplasmic factors that are present in the oocyte (and that may also be present in cultured embryonic stem cellsxxvii) are responsible for the dedifferentiation that takes place. If and when these cytoplasmic factors can be identified and isolated, it may be possible to use them-instead of SCNT into oocytes-to coax some ordinary somatic cells to dedifferentiate back to the pluripotent stage.35 Once again, should the process of dedifferentiation go too far, back to totipotency, the end result will not be a stem cell but the functional equivalent of a zygote, and one would be back in the ethical soup from which this proposal was intended to provide an escape. Great care would therefore have to be exercised to ensure that dedifferentiation, if and when it occurs, goes only so far and no further. Given the complexity of the process, and how little we now know about the factors that regulate differentiation and its opposite, it is not likely that this (second) approach will yield results in the near future.
    What kind of questions do you have?

    -Steven
    ...oh we're not yet dead, to camelot we go

  3. #3
    Senior Member cementhead's Avatar
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    Steven,THANK YOU
    There is much more I need to be educated on.From all of your posts I can see you have done numerous studies and have an extremely large amount of knowledge on any subject concerning SCI.

    Did you get my e-mail earlier?

    If you did e-mail me back with your phone number and I will call you with details.
    Way to much to ask and say my finger can't take all the exercise

  4. #4
    You're welcome.

    I responded to your email, but didn't include my phone number. I am about to head to bed, so maybe we can chat tomorrow?

    -Steven
    ...oh we're not yet dead, to camelot we go

  5. #5
    Senior Member cementhead's Avatar
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    OK Steven I have therapy tommorrow till around 2 pm chicago time

  6. #6
    I e-mailed the organization in Pakistan about the SCI study with TriStem and this was their reply. Personally, I'm skeptical. Their website stated the study was to begin in 2/05.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The SCI study commenced last week. The initial results, although too early to share, are extreemely exciting. Within 5 days of the procedure, a quadrapalegic patient is able to sit up in his bed with minimal assistance whereas prior to the procedure, the same patient was unable to move without the help of 2 assistants.

    Best Regards,
    Tariq Mumtaz
    Managing Director
    Healthcare Solutions International (Pvt) Limited
    Tel: +(9221) 539-1561/64
    Cel: +(92300)8221179
    Fax: +(9221) 539-1565
    e-mail; tmumtaz@hsipl.com

    Here's the website: http://www.hsipl.com/

  7. #7
    Senior Member cementhead's Avatar
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    Steven I was wrong no therapy today.

    Also did not receive e-mail

  8. #8
    I have an appointment with my wheelchair guy in a few minutes, so I'll send another email once it's over.

    Thanks nggun.

    -Steven
    ...oh we're not yet dead, to camelot we go

  9. #9
    You've got mail.

    -Steven
    ...oh we're not yet dead, to camelot we go

  10. #10
    It was good speaking with you. The company I was speaking of was BioAxone in Canada. They are working on a Rho antagonist called Cethrin. (Rho is a pathway that plays a role in inhibiting neurite outgrowth; antagonists interefere with a pathway's natural role.)

    They are actually in Quebec. My apologies for saying British Columbia.

    -Steven
    ...oh we're not yet dead, to camelot we go

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