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Thread: Lifts to help you transfer on a plane

  1. #1

    Smile Lifts to help you transfer on a plane

    Hey Everyone

    I am working with an Airline to establish a way to assist people with disabilities, who cannot transfer on their own, to get on the airplane seat safely without having able-bodied people lift them physically.

    Is anyone aware of such methods or airlines that have mechanical lifts to achieve this? This particular airline is having issues with unions and staff getting injured due to heavy lifting.

    Any suggestions on how I can help them.

    Advise would be appreciated

    Peter

  2. #2
    nope...ive either just transfered myself if the arm rest was moveable.....ive been put where the armrest did not move so they had to lift me up over it...just a guy behind- under my arms.....
    everything is soo time rushed with getting on/off airplanes that i dont see them taking the time to get someone in a harness and bringing a lift on to move them....
    - Rolling Thru Life -

  3. #3
    There is one available in Australia, but as far as I know, it has only been used on domestic flights within Australia and so far has not been introduced in any other countries. It is used instead of an aisle chair.

    http://www.ilcaustralia.org/search4....&MC=44&MinC=12



    We really need something like this in the USA, and worldwide for travelers with mobility disabilities!

    (KLD)

  4. #4
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    Wow, that device is sooo cool! It would solve so many problems for so many of us.

  5. #5
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    Indeed! It looks a lot safer and more stable than any aisle chair I have ever been in!
    Don - Grad Student Emeritus
    T3 ASIA A 26 years post injury

  6. #6
    WTF! Won't catch me using that, you'll look like an old age pensioner / mobile freak show being shipped around a nursing home! and what happens if you want to use the toilet on the plane ... give me an aisle chair any day.

    In the UK there was 'concept' system using an inflatable cushion device (not unlike an inflatable bath seat) that went on the seat and raised you up the the level of the arm rests (and of course the level of transfer chair), then you could just slide across and be lowered down. Much more discrete that than that Oz contraption.

    Several airports in Sweden don't even have ambulifts and you are carried up the steps of the 737 in the transfer chair, great fun when it's -20

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by sarcastrix View Post
    WTF! Won't catch me using that, you'll look like an old age pensioner / mobile freak show being shipped around a nursing home! and what happens if you want to use the toilet on the plane ... give me an aisle chair any day.

    In the UK there was 'concept' system using an inflatable cushion device (not unlike an inflatable bath seat) that went on the seat and raised you up the the level of the arm rests (and of course the level of transfer chair), then you could just slide across and be lowered down. Much more discrete that than that Oz contraption.

    Several airports in Sweden don't even have ambulifts and you are carried up the steps of the 737 in the transfer chair, great fun when it's -20
    Absolutely! I cringe at the idea of being wheeled down a busy aisle swinging around like a lump of meat at the grocery store.

    How about a transfer board kept clipped behind the aisle chair until needed? Low-tech and cheap...

    Being manhandled down aircraft steps in an aisle chair may occassionally be slightly undignified, but it's usually the fastest, least complicated way out of the plane. I've been left inside the plane with the cleaners and a restless flight attendant for over an hour waiting for a lift truck to arrive, many times. The best solution I've used was at salt lake city airport where they had ramps instead of stairs, for all passangers. The 90% of passengers with wheeled luggage definitly approved, and I appreciated not being treated like a leper.

  8. #8
    If you can independently transfer on and off an aisle chair, more power to you. My mother, and many people with more severe impairment cannot, and suffer from a lot of pain being lifted by their arms, or risk being dropped (I have had several clients break legs/hips this way). Lifting a totally dependent person by their arms is also not safe for the staff of the airline or airport helping with the transfer.

    I don't see this equipment any more embarrassing to use than the aisle chair. Airplane cabin attendants are not allowed to lift you to the aisle chair, so forget going to the bathroom mid-flight regardless of the equipment used to get you to your seat if you are not independent in this transfer. My mother feels the aisle chair makes her look like Hannibal Lecter being wheeled around prison! She has stopped flying over this issue. This lift would let her travel again.

    (KLD)

  9. #9
    according to the description, it works on starboard side aisle seats, which would make it overly restrictive. you would need to either stay sitting in the sling during the flight (9.5 hours from here to la) or be able to slide it under you, independently and under very cramped conditions (and possibly in the dark, if its a night flight).

    you only use an aisle chair if you need to move around during the flight. its usually very minimalistic and lightweight, no cushion or footrest, and folds into a compartment. the flight attendant controls access to it, and usually one of them pushes it. you only see them on longer flights, where someone might need to go out to the bathroom or whatever. it is owned by the airline.

    a lot of people use a transfer chair to get on the plane from the airport, and visa versa. they are owned and operated by the airport. the handlers are trained in lifting and transfers, flight attendants are not. the handlers take the chair with them when they leave, immediately after you use it. they are larger and sturdier than aisle chairs, often cushioned with footrests, non collapsible... this type of chair would definitely be capable of using some kind of elevator (plus transfer board) for gravity transfers. however, the aisle chair would not.

    in general, the aisles in international airlines are 12"-14" wide at the wheels, and only about an inch or two more up to the armrests on the seats. if you have an 18" butt, youre probably going to brush against the armrests on each side. i know that southwest airlines allow you to pull up to the first row in your own chair, but thats all domestic - domestic flights usually have roomier passenger areas than international flights. another reason that lift would not be suitable!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Skogy's Avatar
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    I always wear one of these when making my entrance on a plane.


    The lift does look like it would be a nice deal for travelers that need it.

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