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Thread: Slow sitski learner

  1. #11
    Honestly, I am the slowest learner of all time. Only this year do I feel I am getting pretty good. After ten years of at least 5 trips per winter. I am C7 too and it took years to get my equip just right for me. I was injured 20 years ago and biskied for about 5 years before going mono.

    Immeemz, those Halls skis at USARC are the best for learning on! I have one that I modified alot. I think there is one original part on it now!

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by bcripeq View Post
    Honestly, I am the slowest learner of all time. Only this year do I feel I am getting pretty good. After ten years of at least 5 trips per winter. I am C7 too and it took years to get my equip just right for me. I was injured 20 years ago and biskied for about 5 years before going mono.

    Immeemz, those Halls skis at USARC are the best for learning on! I have one that I modified alot. I think there is one original part on it now!
    Hey, I have been on the hill with you and will say for sure that you are a good skier. If you are a slow learner, we all are!

    I have only been skiing for a year. But I have had probably 30-40 days on the snow. So the equivalent of 4-6 years for people who only get out 5 times a year.

    Big gaps between trips to the snow, slow down the learning. When I am away from it for just a few weeks, it seems to take half a day to catch up to where I was.

    Hitting different conditions also can slow the learning process down. You learn in the spring on slush and then go back to fast snow next winter and everything seems different.

    Skiing is fun but there is a steep learning curve. Don't get discouraged. Unless you are planning on racing, the only competition is yourself. Getting down a beginner run without falling is a huge accomplishment as far as I am concerned. It is OK to spend a lot of time with instructors. It is not a sign of failure. I have gotten to the point where I can ski pretty well. But I have probably spent 20 days with instructors.
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by immeemz View Post
    Kay, I hope you are still around to read this. I was Googling something about sitskiing and just happened upon this thread. I just had to comment.

    I tried sit-skiing 10 different times over three years with two different adaptive ski programs. Not once during any of those times was I ever able to complete one single turn without falling over.

    Then this spring I went to a different program (it happened to be USARC, in Big Bear, California). The first half of the day resembled all my other attempts and I was getting discouraged. Then we broke for lunch. Went back out on the slopes. And all of the sudden everything just clicked. I linked two turns. Three. Skied half the run without falling. Skied the entire run without falling. It was like a revelation.

    I am still not very good, but I finally got to where I wasn't on tethers and I could SKI!

    I compared that experience to my other experiences and I think there were a lot of factors why it didn't work the other times. 1) Equipment (the ski I was on that time was much easier to maneuver). 2) Experience of the instructor (at the other places, instructors didn't work with adaptive skiers full time...just once in a while. At USARC, they are full time!) 3) Condition of the hill (at one of the places I tried, they really did not have an appropriate beginner hill and I was starting out on terrain that was too steep) 4) Instructor attitude (I had one place where the instructor got impatient and actually yelled at me. Yes, really. I still can't believe it happened. At USARC, they were all about it being MY day and making sure I had fun). And 5) I just had to keep on getting out there.

    I went skiing 10 times with absolutely no improvement, then one day...this happend: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxW_WhkThWs And I have to say, it was one of the best days of my entire life!

    Keep at it. I just bought myself a new sitski and I am sure that this is going to be the longest summer EVER.
    Immeemz, you are everywhere these days! The ski bug has bitten you hard

    I love it. I am just over one year from trying it for the first time. So I know the feeling. It is tough just getting a taste of it then having to spend all summer waiting for the snow to fall again.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member Sarafino's Avatar
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    It took me two seasons of lessons before I felt confident enough to ski independently, with my husband. I got pretty good at it, could even do black runs if they were groomed. Then we got horses and the cost of a lift ticket buys a lot of hay, but that is a different story for a different thread....

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by outkastsl View Post
    Just like brian said, time and patience. This is my third year and I am somewhat independent, I can get on/off ski lifts no problem, ski intermediate slopes, but can't pick myself up after a fall on flat slopes vs. the steeper stuff.
    Resurrecting this thread, since the snow is falling again.

    Getting good, comfortable, and fully-independent takes time, patience, and a TON of trips down the mountain ... most of them including falls! Preferably with an instructor or some good buddies who don't mind helping out.

    It may not sound all that helpful, but you'll find that it's much easier to get back up on steeper hills. Getting up from the flats just sucks.

    I definitely agree with the equipment comment. Every rig has different balance points, different padding, different straps, different foot position. A slightly different length of outrigger puts your upper body in a different position relative to the hill and changes your balance. Every ski has different edging behavior.

    It takes you a couple of days to adjust to new equipment. You feel like a noob again. If you change everything every time you ski, you're never gonna get to the fun part of skiing.

    Keep getting out there!

  6. #16
    Where are/were you skiing? National Ability Center at Park City, Utah is the best I've ever had in terms of equipment, instructors, slopes, access, training instructors received, etc.

    Not all adaptive ski orgs. are equal, unfortunately. If you have the opportunity, try a few other orgs./resorts instead of sticking with the same one time after time. Unless and until you find a perfect fit, experiment and compare. Once you are more confident in your skiing, you may find other resorts and adaptive ski groups are more enjoyable.

    It can also help to keep a personal log of where you ski, conditions, instructor's names, equipment used, pros/cons, how you feel you did, runs taken with and without harness so you'll know better what does and does not work for you in subsequent trips/years.

    Have fun!

  7. #17
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    Immeemz, I've just read your post almost 9 months later Loved your vid. Great job!

    Thank you guys for your words of encouragement, I really appreciate it!

  8. #18
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Immeemz I loved your video! I still want to try this but it'll have to wait until next winter.

    Doesn't your back or ribs get sore from being in that position? I thought these things had a moulded seat and I was thinking, "How am I gonna fit my fart butt in there?" lol Men have no hips!

    I think I'd need a back .. but nothing on the sides.
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