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  1. #1
    Member tritro2085's Avatar
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    A housing Idea

    As I was searching for apartments and condos so that I can move out of the nursing home facility that Ive been living in since I got out of the hospital 2 yrs ago. I'm thinking, these Places are great, they offer 24hr doorman, gym & swimming pool, lounges, the works. the living spaces are ample and they got the necessary amenities. most importantly they are accessible.

    So it dawns on me why not try to create apartments/condominium geared for the disabled community. after having checked over 20 different condos even though they were "accessible", all of them need some form of modifications. While they may meet FHA standards and be great for Paras, they didnt meet the "full service" Quad standard for example; the bathrooms specifically the shower. IDK about u guys but in NY, Good Luck getting an owner or landlord to allow you to modify their apartments if you need a roll in shower. As a Quad its very disheartening since some of us need that option, others can just transfer into a shower chair.

    The Same standard homes 1bed 1.5bath to 3bed 3.5bath living/dining room terrace etc etc, but the kitchen and bathrooms are fully accessible, an enclosed roll in shower w/ bench and tub, and a kitchen where u and your whole family can be comfortable in. But, Ultimately the goal is to be just like the other condominiums while having met the needs of someone with SCI or any other disability and offering the same perks but with a spin; A Health Spa, & Gym w/ regular and SCI equipment, a personal trainer(s) maybe also a physical and occupational therapist part time. wheelchair accessible Pool . Large communal rooms for parties, a lounge w/ pool table, tv, & bar, teen and kids room etc etc. And one of the biggest upsides that I like is the bonds we would create amongst us and our families.

    looking at the prices of these homes, it just sucks that sometimes after paying upwards $160k, be it condo or private house, we still have to spend more money in order to do basic things like shower or cook.

    All it takes is one idea..wuddya guys think feedback greatly appreciated
    I do like Johnny Walker says and Keep Walking

  2. #2
    Many years ago in Flint Mi UCP (formerly United Cerebral Palsy) built a horse shoe shaped, one story apartment complex - I think about 15 units specifically for chair users. People exiting rehab programs from the local hospitals often moved right in, some who would have perhaps been discharged to nursing homes otherwise. It worked well for people using pca's as there was a lot of sharing of aide services and transportation. The living quarters were like studio apartments, nothing fancy. I was a voc rehab counselor and often had 3 or 4 clients in the complex. Unfortunately, UCP bought property and built the complex in an area which rapidly deteriorated and there was rampant crack sales then lots of crime then shooting very close by. This spelled the doom of the complex - people didn't want to move in and some wanted to escape. I witnessed an awful lot of support between residents and thought that the basic idea was great for avoiding social isolation, residents had a choice as to whether they wanted to interact with other gimps, or not. There was no commons area where residents could get together for recreation, exercise, etc. which I thought would have been great. I really thought the city lost an asset when this disappeared.

  3. #3
    QUAD INC in Portland, Oregon: www.quadinc.org
    Maybe not quite as fancy as you like, but a good start and a good idea...
    - Richard

  4. #4
    Member tritro2085's Avatar
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    Communities like those are absolutely awesome and amazing I wish they had more places like that around here in the east coast.

    What I noticed about that housing complex is that it stated that it's primarily for the elderly, the sick or low education, low-income, non working (for whatever reason), members of our groups which is needed because a lot of people fall into that group.

    But What I'm thinking about is bigger, I'm looking ahead at the future especially for our members who were and are able to go to back school get a High school degree or College one. Those that have their degree and are in the work force. Last but not least the hard worked retirees.

    The condominiums I'm speaking/thinking of offer mid to upscale luxuries and services of the modern metropolitan life for the working "gimp", and if they have their family. You can have Quad stock broker, Para doctors on one floor and a Quad lawyer, Para Teacher on the other.

    Some people may say oh that sounds dumb, but idk if you guys have ever tried to purchase a home b4 you got your SCI, its a hassle finding that place to call your own. Having to go through that hassle with an SCI makes it so much more difficult and EXPENSIVE between the down payment, closing cost, broker fee, lawyer and renovations if needed, $$$ quickly racks up...this could be a seriously viable option that helps bring our pockets by the thousands
    I do like Johnny Walker says and Keep Walking

  5. #5
    Senior Member Joe-MN's Avatar
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    I think that there are several similar to the idea already here in the twin cities. Not sure of the details though. About 12 to 20 units in the two I am think of? One in Robbinsdale, one in Brooklyn Park. If I find any info, I will post.
    Better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.

  6. #6
    Personally, I would not like this kind of community for the same reason that I don't like the concept of retirement communities...isolation, insulation, living out of the mainstream. I would prefer that developers and builders would adapt universal housing designs to serve the widest ranges of ability and disability.

    When people without disabilities look for housing, few if any find exactly what they want in a home. They don't like the floors, the carpet, the color of the tile in the bathroom, the cabinets and type of counters in the kitchen, the flow of the family room to the kitchen, the concrete steps to the front door, etc. But, they buy something that seems workable, with possibilities, in a neighborhood they like, in a school system that is good for the kids, then they spend thousands of dollars remodeling, redoing, and renovating. They make choices based upon the actual price of the dwelling and what they have to do to it to make it "theirs." People with disabilities go through the same process, it just maybe more immediate than able bodied buyers of a home who live with the chipped purple and green bathroom tile until they can change it.

    Unless you custom build a home, you are never going to get exactly what you want. Even if you were fortunate enough to find a wheelchair accessible home to buy in a community you want to live in, there is going to any number of things that you would want or need to change. This is just the way we humans are.

    All the best,
    GJ

  7. #7
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
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    We'd be so in! I wish there were more options like that. We paid alot for our house and had to pay even more to make it accessible.

  8. #8
    Member tritro2085's Avatar
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    Hi gjnl, this kind of community wouldn't be out away from the mainstream, preferably it'd be around city or inside the city aka the metropolitan area like NYC for example. and yes, we all are very picky with our personal preferances and tastes, but my point is having what is neccesary and required for our most basic needs, without the need of having to alter/remodel for it, with some very favorable options. Everything else is cosmetic and will always be in the eyes of the beholder...
    I do like Johnny Walker says and Keep Walking

  9. #9
    Oslo has a few accessible appartments for renting out. The funny thing it is always a one bedroom appartment, they can't believe people with a disability have a children. I was in the office and asked if they had appartments to buy because I wanted my own and they offered me a one bedroom and I when I said I had three children, they just said they didn't help people like me with appartments. Happily I had my daughter with me or I would have been very angry. I asked them what people like me meant and left.

    Happily I found a two bedrooms that I could make accessible, a bigger one was impossible, but my oldest moved out and I had the small one in my own bedroom for a year and then my daughter was moving out too.

    Most of the appartments had a small bathroom and it was impossible to get inside with a wheel chair so I was very lucky.
    TH 12, 43 years post

  10. #10
    Member tritro2085's Avatar
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    That's my point, their should be from studio up too multi-bed/bad penthouse levels for those who have the means to afford it. Also in a building like this their would be non-disabled people living their as well, just not in the accessible apts.

    I wouldn't mind giving something like this an honest shot. I'd have to finish college though, but at least we can all agree there is a need for Great city housing no matter where you are. I wouldn't mind being the Quad trying finding a way to create a "Finer, better, easier" living condominium / community for our professional class.
    I do like Johnny Walker says and Keep Walking

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