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Thread: What's your health regime/ diet?

  1. #1

    What's your health regime/ diet?

    Mary asked me this question in another thread, and I thought it might be fun and interesting to get some general input. My answer is below:

    Quote Originally Posted by marycsm77 View Post
    Scaper

    What type of "diet" or health regime to you follow, you seem by your posts always either making healthy meals or revising ones that are not as healthy? If you wouldn't mind sharing? Mediterranean like, vegetarian?
    I'm pretty much an omnivore, as I lack the willpower to be a vegetarian. My food choices are dictated in large part by my injury - I'm a 90 pound C1/C2 complete, with all the usual secondary complications (especially respiratory troubles), so I really need to maximize the nutritional value of the foods I eat. I don't follow a particular diet, and I do eat meat and a lot of "ethnic" dishes (my motto is "you can curry anything!"). Mainly, I'm diligent about making sure my meals are well balanced with protein, complex carbs, fibre, etc. I find the easiest way to do that is to eat a lot of so-called "super foods" like broccoli, beans & lentils, greens, quinoa, fish, nuts, seeds etc. The Vitamix is an ideal way for me to get fresh fruits and veggies since I have jaw trouble and it saves me a lot of chewing and potential choking (carrot sticks have tried to kill me many times). Blending also increases bio-availability, apparently. I do supplement a bit as there's no way I can get everything I need with the small amounts I eat (larger amounts make me dizzy), but I have my doubts about how much I absorb, being so immobile. Still, I take vitamin D, fish oil, a multivitamin, pre & probiotics, and protein powder. I'll try almost anything someone recommends to improve immunity.

    You're right that I love to alter recipes. I'm an experimenter. Or maybe just a bossy control freak. In baking, I reduce and replace sugar with maple syrup, wheat flour with other types of grains like oats and flax, yogurt instead of fats, etc. I'm not allergic to wheat but find that I feel better without it. I do eat some junk and fried foods but try to keep it to a minimum as my stomach lets me know in no uncertain terms when it's unhappy. Usually one can find some middle ground. “Healthy” chips, for example. We do a lot of grilling on the George Foreman instead of frying in large amounts of oil.

    I take a ridiculous amount of pleasure in making foods that are both good for me and inexpensive. It’s just my mom and I in the house, but you could feed an army with the stuff I’ve frozen or squirreled away. I’m addicted to bulk buying.

    So, yeah, that's about it. Nothing very scientific, and lots of hits and misses. I'm a bad sleeper, so I have time to plan ahead for what I need to buy and make. I also get a lot of ideas from allrecipes.com - they have a great ratings & reviews feature where people share their alterations. Like I said, my approach to eating is a kind of desperate attempt to stay as healthy as possible under the circumstances. It's a bit of a lost cause, but at least something I have control over. Also, if I'm not careful, everything just gets worse (spasms, suctioning, AD, pain...)
    Last edited by Scaper1; 01-03-2011 at 01:36 AM.

  2. #2
    Sounds like a good disciplined yet tasty plan.
    My problem is no imagination. I've got to get some weight off of Dave.
    He worked off his weight before SCI climbing ladders etc. (The fall from the apple tree was a recreational climb with a broken branch)

    Maybe I'll raid your squirreled supply.

  3. #3
    After his diabetes was diagnosed in September, we switched to a low-carb diet. We are also trying to do low-fat as much as possible, since they want my husband to lose about 50 lbs. So far he's lost 10 lbs, and other than not having cereal for breakfast, he hasn't missed the carbs most of the time.
    Asian food is our favorite by far, so we've switched to brown rice and use Dreamfield pasta when we make lo mein and other noodle favorites. We use artificial sweetened instead of sugar when we make our own teriyaki sauce, etc...
    He just had his blood redrawn and we'll find out how successful these changes have been when we go back to the dr later this month.
    Kimber in SoCal
    Wife to Tom, T12 incomplete since 1988

  4. #4
    Senior Member marycsm77's Avatar
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    Sounds good Scaper. I especially like the fact that you are always "experimenting" and trying new things. That is something I have always lacked in the kitchen.

    I was a vegetarian for about 15 years, i enjoyed the lifestyle. Went back to my eating habits pre-veg for a couple of reasons a few years ago, that had nothing to do with food or health. I am heading in that direction again and making improvements. It was never difficult for me to give up all meat, i did it overnight and never missed it. I believe I will not exclude wild fish however and just call it a more "plant based" way of eating including fish, but not fully vegetarian, we will see how it goes.

    What it did for me was force me really, to explore new foods that I had never eaten before and broaden the base of foods I was eating. I tend to be a very boring eater and although I try to be pretty healthy, I can be pretty repetitive, which I don't like. While I have an interest in food, eating and how it affects the body and health, i never particularly enjoyed cooking! I think it's the cleaning up and chopping stuff, ugh I do it of course but I don't much like it.

    However your experimentation and trying new things Scaper has inspired me to add trying new recipes to my goals for this year. I want to learn to prepare at least 1 new meal, even if it's easy each week, hopeufully with some ingredients I am not overly familiar with. I am looking forward to making some things with my Vita Mix other than juices.

    I believe the theory that consistent small changes everyday can lead to permanent changes in habit.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiamenmom View Post
    After his diabetes was diagnosed in September, we switched to a low-carb diet. We are also trying to do low-fat as much as possible, since they want my husband to lose about 50 lbs. So far he's lost 10 lbs, and other than not having cereal for breakfast, he hasn't missed the carbs most of the time.
    Asian food is our favorite by far, so we've switched to brown rice and use Dreamfield pasta when we make lo mein and other noodle favorites. We use artificial sweetened instead of sugar when we make our own teriyaki sauce, etc...
    He just had his blood redrawn and we'll find out how successful these changes have been when we go back to the dr later this month.
    I don't know if you are aware of this, but Glucerna now makes about four different breakfast cereals with time release carbs. He should be able to have some of that without weight gain or high glucose.

  6. #6
    HIGH protein, lots of supplements. nobody get what they need from food alone especially active gimps.
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Scaper1 View Post
    Mary asked me this question in another thread, and I thought it might be fun and interesting to get some general input. My answer is below:



    I'm pretty much an omnivore, as I lack the willpower to be a vegetarian. My food choices are dictated in large part by my injury - I'm a 90 pound C1/C2 complete, with all the usual secondary complications (especially respiratory troubles), so I really need to maximize the nutritional value of the foods I eat. I don't follow a particular diet, and I do eat meat and a lot of "ethnic" dishes (my motto is "you can curry anything!"). Mainly, I'm diligent about making sure my meals are well balanced with protein, complex carbs, fibre, etc. I find the easiest way to do that is to eat a lot of so-called "super foods" like broccoli, beans & lentils, greens, quinoa, fish, nuts, seeds etc. The Vitamix is an ideal way for me to get fresh fruits and veggies since I have jaw trouble and it saves me a lot of chewing and potential choking (carrot sticks have tried to kill me many times). Blending also increases bio-availability, apparently. I do supplement a bit as there's no way I can get everything I need with the small amounts I eat (larger amounts make me dizzy), but I have my doubts about how much I absorb, being so immobile. Still, I take vitamin D, fish oil, a multivitamin, pre & probiotics, and protein powder. I'll try almost anything someone recommends to improve immunity.

    You're right that I love to alter recipes. I'm an experimenter. Or maybe just a bossy control freak. In baking, I reduce and replace sugar with maple syrup, wheat flour with other types of grains like oats and flax, yogurt instead of fats, etc. I'm not allergic to wheat but find that I feel better without it. I do eat some junk and fried foods but try to keep it to a minimum as my stomach lets me know in no uncertain terms when it's unhappy. Usually one can find some middle ground. “Healthy” chips, for example. We do a lot of grilling on the George Foreman instead of frying in large amounts of oil.

    I take a ridiculous amount of pleasure in making foods that are both good for me and inexpensive. It’s just my mom and I in the house, but you could feed an army with the stuff I’ve frozen or squirreled away. I’m addicted to bulk buying.

    So, yeah, that's about it. Nothing very scientific, and lots of hits and misses. I'm a bad sleeper, so I have time to plan ahead for what I need to buy and make. I also get a lot of ideas from allrecipes.com - they have a great ratings & reviews feature where people share their alterations. Like I said, my approach to eating is a kind of desperate attempt to stay as healthy as possible under the circumstances. It's a bit of a lost cause, but at least something I have control over. Also, if I'm not careful, everything just gets worse (spasms, suctioning, AD, pain...)
    Paleo "diet"
    My mouth is like a magician's hat, never know what might come out of it.

  8. #8
    Being I am part Honey Badger Cobras fill me up at dinner time
    Last edited by GL; 03-04-2011 at 03:02 AM.

  9. #9
    I have lost 35 pounds over the last year. It really wasn't that hard, but after weighing a little bit over 220 pounds, and the sizes of my pants continuing to go up I just decided to do a few tweaks in my regiment. I., like most people who have an indwelling catheter drink tons of water so that's not a problem. The first step for me was following one of Opera's advices. Don't eat anything two hours before bedtime. For me that just meant eliminating dessert after dinner. And I love me some ice cream.

    In the morning, I always start out with a bowl of oatmeal, Activia yogurt, and a bowl of fresh fruit like strawberries, blueberries, bananas. During the winter time I sip on green tea with honey all day long and during the summertime I make myself a really nice iced tea blend. I hate not using real sugar and having to use a sugar substitute, but if I must then I choose honey or the sugar that comes in the raw cane form (Stevia) I believe it is called.

    For lunch I used to eat those Healthy Choice meals at work that contained only 500 calories and usually anywhere between 4 to 7 g of fat, but they have so much sodium that my feet started to swell and became very edematous. I am not really one to do my weight shifts every 20 minutes, so I started to just poach some chicken, add a few crisp veggies to it, and some light miracle whip along with one of the sugar free Jell-O pudding brands, and if I'm still hungry between lunch and dinner then I will drink a Slim Fast.

    It's all about portions and I am now down to right around 190 pounds, my cholesterol dropped dramatically and my HDL actually went up without even doing any exercise. Eating nuts as a snack and other things that can boost your HDL is a total bonus. Just staying away from fast food (see the movie "Super Size Me") and increasing your fluids, cutting back on dessert, and getting your metabolism started by eating a breakfast can help you lose 10 pounds in a month easily. From sitting after 13 years I will never be back to the waist size that I was prior to my injury, but it's nice to have a lot more options when it comes to shopping for suits and the such.

    I guess I also have to mention that some weight loss may be attributed to some atrophy in my quads. For the first 10 years my legs were like tree trunks and it really looked like I could get out of my chair and walk as if nothing had happened, now those legs are a little bit skinny -- not toothpicks, but noticeably skinny. When I started to employ the use of my electric leg bag drainer that would allow me to work in the office without having to ask somebody to assist me in emptying my leg back, I had to start wearing the Velcro straps that would keep my feet in because of I had one spasm and it disconnected my tubing, it was like the flood before Noah and I went through many pairs of shoes. Spasms don't bother me at all, but you can't afford to be professional and go around with urine dripping all over the place. :-)

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by GL View Post
    Being I am part Honey Badger Cobras fill me up at dinner time
    I've heard it tastes like chicken GL-is it true? Ew- I should watch that video while I eat to curb my appetite.

    Sounds like your hard work is paying off lawdog.
    (see the honey badger thread)

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