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Thread: How many people do you think would like to see you cured?

  1. #1

    How many people do you think would like to see you cured?

    How many people do you think would like to see you cured. I'm interested in the types of numbers that you would provide. Count them on your fingers, toes, and the fingers and toes of those around you. Tell me. How many?

    I think there are easily about 100 people who would love me to get up out of my chair. And if you add another twenty or so people who would like to give me a punch in the head but are refraining while I'm in a wheelchair, my number goes up to 120 people.

    I bet that I could get all 120 to sign a petition for better organization and funding for stem cell research (but I don't think petitions are an answer).

    I bet I could get about 80 to sign a postcard and actually mail it back to me asking for the same, and about 50 would attend a demonstration to get me a cure. The twenty in line to give me a punch in the head would probably storm any necessary barricades.

    Everyone claims that the spinal cord injury community is too small to gain the necessary attention for a cure, but I don't think so.

    For world wide spinal cord injury numbers, please see today's blog post at StemCells&AtomBombs
    Dennis Tesolat
    www.StemCellsandAtomBombs.blogspot.com

    "Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom."
    Martin Luther King

  2. #2
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    I know that this is not the answer you expect, or are probably looking for, but I have spent a lifetime making friends who do not care one whit about me being in a chair. I am proud to have found such wonderful friends, and they would only be happy if I was happy. Without my expressing my joy, my need, my desperation, they would not think in those terms at all. This is undoubtedly going to be an unpopular expression here, but when you have been dealing with SCI as long as I have it became crucial to have people in my life who did not see the chair as an obstacle, and because they do not, it would not occur to them to think in those terms.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen View Post
    I know that this is not the answer you expect, or are probably looking for, but I have spent a lifetime making friends who do not care one whit about me being in a chair. I am proud to have found such wonderful friends, and they would only be happy if I was happy. Without my expressing my joy, my need, my desperation, they would not think in those terms at all. This is undoubtedly going to be an unpopular expression here, but when you have been dealing with SCI as long as I have it became crucial to have people in my life who did not see the chair as an obstacle, and because they do not, it would not occur to them to think in those terms.
    That is great advice. It is really easy to rely on the chair for sympathy and help, but that doesn't put you on equal footing with people you are friends with. If you are always sad, or talking about how much your life sucks people will start to avoid you. If you are upbeat and act just like a walker except you have a wheelchair that causes some logistical problems I think your friends will start to see you not as a burden but as the person you are. Only my wife really knows of the pain and frustration that I have which we all share, if I put that out for all the world to see I feel like I would quickly have no friends at all.

  4. #4
    Dennis, be quiet - stop causing a stir - I was sleeping ;-)

  5. #5
    I don't mind people wishing I was ok. I sure as hell do. It's not pity, just a natural reaction to seeing a friend or loved one in a constant struggle just to breathe and function with a hopelessly broken body. Even the wee family members know it's not right or fair.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by StemCells&AtomBombs View Post
    How many people do you think would like to see you cured. I'm interested in the types of numbers that you would provide. Count them on your fingers, toes, and the fingers and toes of those around you. Tell me. How many?
    I think almost everyone who knows me, but that doesn't stop us from living now. I'm about to attend a series of parties for the holiday season and life goes on. Is everyone at the party going to stop living because Todd is in a chair? Fuck no! Besides, my paternal grandmother is so busy making people feel sorry for her, she would steal my thunder in a heartbeat. That bitch is so obnoxious, she will complain to me about walking. I actually find humor in it now because it's so ingrained in her personality to pity herself.


  7. #7
    I can probably put together 100 people (maybe more) willing to give some kind of help, but for many you have just one shot.
    It's like for snipers, you need to have the right target in sight at the right distance.
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen View Post
    I know that this is not the answer you expect, or are probably looking for, but I have spent a lifetime making friends who do not care one whit about me being in a chair. I am proud to have found such wonderful friends, and they would only be happy if I was happy. Without my expressing my joy, my need, my desperation, they would not think in those terms at all. This is undoubtedly going to be an unpopular expression here, but when you have been dealing with SCI as long as I have it became crucial to have people in my life who did not see the chair as an obstacle, and because they do not, it would not occur to them to think in those terms.
    Sorry, but you have missed the point. I subscribe to Atombomb's site, and know that he has been misinterpreted. I don't want to be pitied and don't like people "helping" me to do things I can do for myself. However, going up (or down) a ramp only to meet a swing door is something where I am more than happy for a little help. Friends who seem to "go off" you because of the chair aren't real friends.

    Having said this, the day when the chair goes in the skip would be absolutely terrific.

    I don't see anything unpopular in what you say. It reflects well the current attitude that it's incurable. If the Wright Brothers had said we can't fly then we wouldn't.
    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
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  9. #9
    Senior Member mcferguson's Avatar
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    I can think of 500 people that want to see me out of the chair: family, friends, church, drs, and therapists. No matter how well I have adapted, everyone would like to see me better off.
    T5/6, ASIA A, injured 30 Nov 08
    Future SCI Alumnus.
    I don't want to dance in the rain, I want to soar above the storm.

  10. #10
    The number of people that would take action to help me get out of the w/c dipends on what I ask them to do. Also it has to be something they believe can really work.
    The easyer the better.
    I said 100 people or more.. Actually, from my experiance, it can be from 10 to a 1000 depending on what I ask them to do.
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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