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Thread: 1st day on the slopes yesterday

  1. #81
    In our group we have a vet hes t4, hes totally ind in every aspect. He has the lifty tell him when the seat is about there then he pops on.
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  2. #82
    Senior Member patd's Avatar
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    Skiing is the best rehab excercise if you ask me! To take my kids skiing is one of my greatest joys.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQ6gN9LEL_A

  3. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    I used to be an avid snowboarder before my injury and my friends are all pushing me to try sit skiing. I have been reluctant for a couple of reasons and wouldn't mind an opinion on them.

    - How much help do you need to do this? I hate asking for help, and ideally I could throw my sit ski (or whatever you call it) in the back of my car and head to tahoe. Can you do this without someone helping you? How do you transfer on and off it? What do you do with your chair? Can you get around on the sit ski without help (going from the end of the run to the chair, on/off the lift, from the end of run to the parking lot, etc)

    - Boarding was heaven, booming through deep powder was like flying. Can anyone who used to board compare sit skiing to boarding? Is it worth the expense/time/effort?

    Thanks,
    Tom
    T8,

    There is a great adaptive program in Tahoe called Disabled Sports USA Far West. http://www.dsusafw.org/

    Skiing is freedom as far as I am concerned. There are definitely people with your injury level skiing independently.... and often better than many able bodied skiers.

    It took my a while to give in and give skiing a try. Sorry I waited so long. It has been a great ski season so far in the Sierra. Give the Tahoe program a call and get over there for some fun. Expect to be challenged. It is worth the effort though.
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  4. #84
    T8 - how much trunk control do you have? If you have good trunk control (like a T12ish level), then usually one can become an accomplished monoskier. If you have poor trunk control (like a T4-5 range), then it is my experience that people can not become a solid enough monoskier to go get the pow....
    arndog

  5. #85
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arndog View Post
    T8 - how much trunk control do you have? If you have good trunk control (like a T12ish level), then usually one can become an accomplished monoskier. If you have poor trunk control (like a T4-5 range), then it is my experience that people can not become a solid enough monoskier to go get the pow....
    arndog
    totally NOT true, i believe pat is a quad and he skies by himself

  6. #86
    I think T8 is T8

    So far, I don't do powder well at all. Maybe someday. I will keep having a blast on the groomers.
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  7. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by jschism View Post
    totally NOT true, i believe pat is a quad and he skies by himself
    I didn't say that one can't ski independently. I said one may not be able to get the pow...the goods...i.e new snow.... to ski confidently on hard terrain like KT at Squaw and dive into Chute 75 with 1.5 ft of new snow.

  8. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by arndog View Post
    I didn't say that one can't ski independently. I said one may not be able to get the pow...the goods...i.e new snow.... to ski confidently on hard terrain like KT at Squaw and dive into Chute 75 with 1.5 ft of new snow.
    arndog,

    thanks, i can tell from your other posts you know what its like to love deep powder I am about a year and a half post injury and in rehab they assesed me at a t7 funtional level (I do have a burst fracture at t8 hence my charming name) I feel I have gained more stability since then but maybe I am just getting better at things.

    how is sitskiing compared to ab boarding? is it like sex, good but compared to when you were ab basically disappointing?

  9. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by patd View Post
    Skiing is the best rehab excercise if you ask me! To take my kids skiing is one of my greatest joys.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQ6gN9LEL_A
    Great video Pat, any chance you have one of you getting on and off the lift?
    Tough Times Don't Last...Tough People Do!

  10. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    arndog,

    how is sitskiing compared to ab boarding? is it like sex, good but compared to when you were ab basically disappointing?
    T8burst - if you have some trunk control and were a good boarder or skier prior to SCI, it is definitely worth giving it a go. Although it isn't like AB boarding/skiing it certainly has good moments. The cold air, warm california sun, listening to the bombs go off by the ski patrol to control the mountain ealy in the morning, riding lifts with a view of Tahoe and snow in the trees, carving good turns. It feels very fast since your head is at the level of a 5 year old and you are closer to the ground. That is a fun aspect. But it also means you can't analyze the terrain as easily as you did when you were 2 feet taller.

    Powder skiing vs. Sex, always a worthwhile debate! - if you can learn to monoski soft snow, it is very good - massive face shots since your head is at the level of a 5 year old. You can mount a very wide ski and it really is wonderful. It requires very solid balance and minimal rigger use for turning. If you rely on your outrigger it will get stuck in the powder and rotate you and take you down. You have to be super-cautious in powder because it is difficult to get up if you auger in since there is less of a base to push with using the outrigger. It is hard for a L1 level guy so T7 is going to have a tough time. But worth trying.

    Powder skiing was one if not my greatest joy and 9 years post SCI I suffer a bit when I see it snowing with the knowledge that it never will be the same. I do have a memory of skiing West Face off KT at Squaw after 1 foot new over some previous storms that filled in all the moguls. They opened the upper mountain and the masses of skiers and riders left me and Mark Wellman the West Face for ourselves. GS turning, suffocating from face shots that were like a firehose pointing at your goggles and face. We had to stop after a number of turns to breathe. That day and at that moment, monoskiing was as good as being AB boarder/skier.

    Monoskiing still is valuable and a cool skill to develop. If you find you are capable to get in new snow, and really no way to know unless you try, monoskiing is great and is more than glorified sledding. TASS(Tahoe Adaptive Ski School) at Alpine Meadows is the place to go if you live in the Bay Area.

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