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Thread: Yet Another Question about Mid-Level Paras and Handcycles

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  1. #1

    Yet Another Question about Mid-Level Paras and Handcycles

    So, as a T9, I have a lot of trunk control, but not nearly as much as a low para who would likely use a kneeler. However, I have more function than a high para/low quad, who would benefit from the recliner Force R, and the Force.

    I've tried the more reclined position for the hand cycle and although it's the most aerodynamic position for racing, it just doesn't seem conducive to a full body workout. In fact, it feels as if it isolates the workout to the arms and shoulders, not engaging my back or abs at all.

    I enjoy handcycling and want to purchase one myself, with the hopes of becoming competitive again. I guess maybe what I need to do is divorce the notion of a full body workout from the idea of speed and aerodynamics in a race. Is the assumption correct that one is mutually exclusive of the other?

    Are there other T9s who prefer the fully reclined position over something upright like the Force G? Why so? Are you able to engage as much of your body in the reclined position as you are in an upright position? Did you start off with a Force G, realized that it gave you a full body workout, but decided to switch to the R because it preformed better in races?

    These pieces of equipment are not cheap, and so I'm trying to decide what would be best tailored to what I'm hoping to get out of handcycling. It's really unfortunate that the retailers out here don't have a number of models you can try out to help the decision process, and so that's why I'm relying on your opinion. The people I know who handcycle are either kneelers, or fully reclined. I have yet to meet someone who sits upright.

  2. #2
    Tough decisions. I'm an incomplete T10 and have a Force G. I like it. I would probably be faster on a Force R. I like the upright position of the G though.

    I have done one marathon. Cycling for me though is about freedom and being able to go on long rides. I like the view. I like the visibility.

    If my focus were racing, I might get an R. Only if I were serious about competition though.

    I think very few people are going for kneelers anymore. Even the low injuries. Most races are full of Force R type cycles these days.
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  3. #3
    One more thing. As far as core workout goes. I think you are right, you can probably get more from a Force G. I often ride with a style that does give my trunk more of a workout. I am MUCH faster though if I try and not use my trunk.
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  4. #4
    I'm a T4 and have progressed over time from xlt pro "sit up" then xlt gold "sit up" and now I have an original force not the R or G. I am not a racer but have done century rides and when healthy typically ride 100-150 miles per week. My 2 cents is this, I'm in it for the workout and I had far better results from the sit up bikes. The Force is more comfortable and it cuts through the wind etc. but if you want to work your core muscles etc. I'd go with the sit up. I'm out right now after elbow surgery and going to sell my gold and force come the new year and then get something else. I met a T6 who changed some measurements on a kneeler and sits in like a racing chair position but is still over the tops of his cranks. It looks like a great workout and he loves it. He's going to let me try it once I'm healed up. I hope it works as it looks like loads more fun and a much better workout than any bike I have ridden. good luck with whatever you go with

  5. #5
    For a full core workout, LC1 from Fredom Ryder. Lean steer would offer better, more efficient work on abs and obliques than Force G. Force G is an improved version of the Top End Gold. Nothing wrong with the G. Depends if you want to primarily race and place or just train and ride.

    Freedom Ryder leansteers also have a better turning radius than any other recumbent out there

  6. #6
    I think the best approach is to get one that I can use for leisure and for racing recreationally [if such a thing exists]. If I can commit to training, find a coach, and it's recommended that I switch to something better suited for racing, then I'll find the money to buy another.

    Right now, I'm looking to get back into shape, and I also have AB friends who want to go cycling with me. We have some beautiful paved trails on the westcoast along the water like the Sea Wall in Vancouver, so I'm hoping to get a cycle I can take out there, be able to enjoy the view and converse with my friends while riding. I think a fully reclined chair would be awkward for that purpose.

    I think my final decision is to get the Force G.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    For a full core workout, LC1 from Fredom Ryder. Lean steer would offer better, more efficient work on abs and obliques than Force G. Force G is an improved version of the Top End Gold. Nothing wrong with the G. Depends if you want to primarily race and place or just train and ride.

    Freedom Ryder leansteers also have a better turning radius than any other recumbent out there
    I agree Patrick, if I get another sit up it will be the LC1. From what I hear speaking with a number of different distance riders, they're the ticket. I also like that it is lighter than the Force and easier to load/unload. I can't get over the weight of my force.

  8. #8
    One consideration is that the new Force-2 is about half the price of a Force G.

  9. #9
    Force-2 is an option. If I were a good functioning T/9 , I'd go with a used leansteer over the F-2 just for the fact of better quality running gear, shorter turning radius, more efficient workout of core muscle groups and better visibility by drivers .

    Course a person can always upgrade running gear but then might as well go for the Force R or G.

    I miss my leansteer for sure but sure like my FRH-1. Riding the Seawall, UBC trails or the trails in North Van. is definitly a fun experience on a h/c.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
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    Dec 2010
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    Vancouver, BC
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    Hi Kiran, this is Mike Negraeff in Vancouver. Nice to see you again! I am thinking of getting the Freedom Ryder FRH-1 and a trainer to use indoors in winter here. Did you look at that one? It looks pretty comfortable for the cruising experience also and sounds like they've solved some of those problems like turning radius, busting brake cables and rubbing your legs with the front wheel.
    In fact I was thinking of seeing if Patrick in Blaine would mind letting me try his out if I came for a drive down to Blaine.

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