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Thread: An easy way for a quad to peel onions??

  1. #1

    An easy way for a quad to peel onions??

    I really enjoy cooking but have never found an easy way to peel onions. I slice them in half with a knife and then push the outer skins off with my thumb nails. It is difficult cutting through the tough outer skins with a knife. I find that a knife with a serrated edge works best, but even that is not easy. When I peel the onions, I end up wasting a couple layers of good onion. Any suggestions? I have never seen an onion peeler advertised.
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  2. #2
    I generally just peel the whole outermost layer off...it's a waste but onions are not very expensive. The slap n chop chops them and many other vegetables very nicely - love it for making a mire poix for soups etc. (works perfectly on the onion,celery,carrot, mushrooms,garlic - not so well on things like bell pepper,tomato)
    Emily, C-8 sensory incomplete mom to a 8 year old and a preschooler. TEN! years post.

  3. #3
    For someone who really likes cooking, it may seem like the lazy way, but sometimes (when she is cooking up a storm of soups or around the holidays) NL buys peeled, chopped onions at our supermarket. Yes, they are a little more expensive, but will save you a lot of time, effort, and tears. ;-)

    All the best,
    GJ

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Emi2 View Post
    I generally just peel the whole outermost layer off...it's a waste but onions are not very expensive. The slap n chop chops them and many other vegetables very nicely - love it for making a mire poix for soups etc. (works perfectly on the onion,celery,carrot, mushrooms,garlic - not so well on things like bell pepper,tomato)
    Without a doubt, I'd go with the slap-n-chop type device as recommended above. My eyes don't tear up as much either when using this device.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    For someone who really likes cooking, it may seem like the lazy way, but sometimes (when she is cooking up a storm of soups or around the holidays) NL buys peeled, chopped onions at our supermarket. Yes, they are a little more expensive, but will save you a lot of time, effort, and tears. ;-)

    All the best,
    GJ
    ditto or the cuisinart
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  6. #6
    I can't answer specifically for a quad, but the slap chops are a good suggestion.

    In general, wet onions are easier to peel than dry. Just cut in half and soak in some cool water for 15 minutes. It'll help on the tears also.

    As for cutting, I find it hard to believe a serrated blade would cut better than a straight blade. A good knife is worth well worth the money. And with a sharp edge, you should be able to "let the knife do the work". I like the santoku style knives for general veggie chopping. The blades with the little oval divots help reduce the drag and sticking.


    This sharpener does a good job. They are only about $4, and they need replaced often or you can do more harm than good once they are worn out. But it takes no precision or skill to use.


    Another few tips:
    Have a solid cutting surface. Put a wet towel under your cutting board to make it stay put.
    And I often us a kevlar glove when cutting for your non-knife hand (probably left hand). Safety first.
    Last edited by crashmoto; 11-10-2010 at 07:20 PM.
    Mike
    T4 since 2003 motocross accident.

  7. #7
    Senior Member WolfeMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashmoto View Post
    As for cutting, I find it hard to believe a serrated blade would cut better than a straight blade. A good knife is worth well worth the money. And with a sharp edge, you should be able to "let the knife do the work". I like the santoku style knives for general veggie chopping. The blades with the little oval divots help reduce the drag and sticking.
    Couldn't agree more, a sharp knife will EASILY slice through an onion much easier than a serated knife, less drag and like Moto said, let the knife work for you. You don't need an expensive knife, just a good one. HERE is what I use and the sharpener Moto suggested is also good. That or an AccuSharp.

    As for holding the onion and peeling it.......try getting a cutting board and driving two stainless steel nails through it until they protrude an inch and a half or 2" out. This way you can push the onion or potato or whatever you're cooking into the 'food safe' nails and they will hold it for you. If you prefer, you can drill the holes and just use the nails when you need them and remove them when you don't.

    If you're interested in something like this, let me know and I'll make one for you.
    Last edited by WolfeMan; 11-12-2010 at 10:14 AM.
    Larry
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  8. #8
    These are the types of cutting board w/nail holders Wolfeman is describing.

    Assorted cutting boards here http://pattersonmedical.com/app.aspx...ions&id=100796. Ie:



    See here for additional discussion on knives, incl. pics: Quad food prep; cooking and product tips

    For Quads with limited/no hand function and strength, a serrated knife can be more useful for some/most cutting needs in that they can help to "break thru" food items with less pressure required. They can also help to "grip" the food, in a sense, thus move and slip around less than a straight edge while positioning and cutting.

    RE onions, have you tried cutting in half both ways - w/ends up/dwn and side/side? Is one way easier/more stable than the other? Once halved, do you then lay flat and cut off the ends (may be easier, tho less stable, to cut ends with flat cut side facing up) before attempting to peel off the rest of skin?

  9. #9
    Thanks for the suggestion about the nails in the cutting board. That should help a lot when I am cutting the onions in half. They try to scoot out from the knife until the knife cuts a slit in the hard dry outer skins. That is why I use a serrated edge knife. The teeth help to grip and puncture the skin. Modifying a cutting board will be my weekend project.

    Now if I can find a better way to get the outer skins off with stiff non-functional thumb after the onions are cut in half.

    Once they are peeled, I can chop and slice them without a problem. For big jobs, I use my food processor.

    As for sharp knives, my Cutcos beat all the others. They are made a few miles from where I was born. If you are into kitchen knives, watch the inserted video.


    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    Now if I can find a better way to get the outer skins off with stiff non-functional thumb after the onions are cut in half.
    From my previous post:
    Once halved, do you then lay flat and cut off the ends (may be easier, tho less stable, to cut ends with flat cut side facing up) before attempting to peel off the rest of skin?
    Once halved, cutting off the ends (stems) allow the outer layers/skin to peel or lift off easily, even with a non-functioning thumb. If a thumb is stiff, even better, as you can use that stiffness as leverage as you use your thumbnail to lift the edge of skin layers. If one can manipulate a knife, getting the skin off should be relatively easy, but if necessary, the end of the knife or a fork can function as well.

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