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Thread: Olfactory ensheathing cells - another miracle cure for spinal cord injury?

  1. #1

    Olfactory ensheathing cells - another miracle cure for spinal cord injury?

    • Raisman G (2001). Olfactory ensheathing cells - another miracle cure for spinal cord injury? Nat Rev Neurosci. 2 (5): 369-75. Summary: Several recent publications describe remarkably promising effects of transplanting olfactory ensheathing cells as a potential future method to repair human spinal cord injuries. But why were cells from the nose transplanted into the spinal cord? What are olfactory ensheathing cells, and how might they produce these beneficial effects? And more generally, what do we mean by spinal cord injury? To what extent can we compare repair in an animal to repair in a human? <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?db=m&form=6&dopt=r&uid=11331921> Division of Neurobiology, Norman and Sadie Lee Research Centre, National Institute for Medical Research, Medical Research Council, London NW7 1AA, UK. graisma@nimr.mrc.ac.uk

  2. #2
    I am not expecting too much from Dr. Raisman. I would rather bet on Almudena Ramon-Cueto who showed the efficieny of OEC transplants in rats no too long ago and I think she is now testing the technology on monkeys. As far as I know, she worked in Madrid at the CSIC http://www.csic.es/english/ and moved to the Instituto de Biomedicina in Valencia http://www.dicv.csic.es/ibv.html
    Not too much info there, I can decipher, but maybe Senhor Bruno could help us out

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    Well, i read the link you gave, but there isn't anything very interesting there in direct relation to spinal cord injuries..., it's everything about genetic engineering.

    Last time i heard about Almudena she was having problems with funding, to go ahead..., not sure if it's true or not, maybe someone from Spain can enlighten us...

    Bruno

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    DR YOUNG - WILFRIED'S MESSAGE OF 4 SEPTEMBER

    Wilfried

    I don't think Geof Raisman's work can be dismissed that easily

    What do you think Dr Young?

    Chris

  5. #5
    Actually, my hope is that all the groups will advance together. This is not a horse race.

    Bruno, it seems that Almudena Ramon-Cuetos may be getting some funding...

    Wilfried, one should never dismiss the British.

    Christopher Paddon, the key is in the pockets of the neurosurgeons working with each of these groups. By the way, we should not leave out the Louisville group where Chris Shields has been pushing the envelope with nasoepithelial stem cells. Also, don't forget the Yale group where Jeff Kocsis and his colleagues have been moving with the Alexion cells and the Australians who have been reporting success in animal studies (see the recent papers that I posted on the Research forum). The Russians in Novosibirsk are already transplanting fetal OEG's. Much depends which of the groups, i.e. Madrid, London, Miami, Louisville, Yale, Australian, and Russian groups get the details right and have neurosurgeons who are believers and willing to move to clinical trial.

    However, there are risks and lots of unanswered questions. I also want to say that I don't think that this is a problem where the groups should rush in with a damn-the-torpedoes approach. If a patient dies or the treatment does not work, it will set the field back several years. We should also not set expectations so high that if the first patient doesn't walk, we dismiss the therapy. Even in animal studies, the treatment does not work every time.

    http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=14354

    [This message was edited by Wise Young on November 02, 2001 at 08:10 AM.]

  6. #6
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    Top notch Doc!!!!

    Thanks again for another outstanding post



    john

    more sci's need to understand your last paragraph:


    "However, there are risks and lots of unanswered questions. I also want to say that I don't think that this is a problem where the groups should rush in with a damn-the-torpedoes approach. If a patient dies or the treatment does not work, it will set the field back several years. We should also not set expectations so high that if the first patient doesn't walk, we dismiss the therapy. Even in animal studies, the treatment does not work every time. "

  7. #7
    I was talking with a friend the other day and found another analogy that Texans might appreciate. With the OEG situation, we are at fourth down with a yard or two to go. Is it time for a pass? Wise.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jeremy's Avatar
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    As long as it isn't a Hail Mary . Is there much OEG research going on in Canada?


  9. #9
    Senior Member Jeff's Avatar
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    Time for a pass?

    That sounds like a big effort to gain more yards than needed. I'd just like to see a quarterback sneak or a handoff to a big, ugly, mean runningback who won't accept defeat. Getting a first down to me means successful animal data opening the door for some entity with deep pockets to begin championing the treatment. That would give us a fresh start and four more downs. I'd also like to see combinations investigated that would make OEG more effective in chronic injury - the larger market.

    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

  10. #10
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    too bad jeff, all i see on 4th and 1 yard to go is usa researchers taiking a knee.

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