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Thread: Frank Reynolds Treated His Own Spinal Cord Injury And Walked Again

  1. #11
    Senior Member mcferguson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    I found Wise on Facebook a few weeks ago and asked him for his comments. Here's the conversation:

    Me
    Hi Wise. Can you share a quick sentence or two re InVivo Therapuetics? The Reynolds TED presentation has created considerable excitement on CC and I was wondering whether the buzz equals the hype.
    Wise
    The company uses technology developed by the Langer lab and Ted Teng. I respect them. I haven't heard sufficient detail about their clinical trial in spinal cord injury to have any comments, however.
    Me
    Has their data not yet been published?
    Wise
    I am not sure that the polymer scaffold that they have is any better or worse than others. I don't know how they are going to implant the scaffold. In rats where they use the scaffold to connect the spinal cord but they haven't indicated how they plan to do this in human.
    Wise
    They are doing the monkey studies but those studies have not yet been published (at least I haven't seen it). They are good people and I am hopeful that they will come up with a good clinical trial proposal that I can support.
    Me
    My father -- who has no expertise re SCI research -- watched the video and was turned off by Reynold's "pitchman" presentation, particularly as it may be aimed toward the upcoming IPO -- not that you can comment.
    Wise
    Yes, unfortunately, all the best intentions are often subverted when money is involved.
    Me
    But Reynolds seemed to be suggesting that their 100% success in their primate studies was a first, hence all the excitement.
    Wise
    I have trouble imagining how they will implant a scaffold into the injury site of the spinal cord.
    Me
    OK. We'll all stay tuned. Thanks!
    Wise
    In animals, where you are creating the injury, you can use the scaffold to bridge a cut spinal cord. However, if you are doing this in a contused spinal cord, where do you cut and what do you remove in order to fit the scaffold in?
    Me
    One last Q: When it comes to treating chronics, if you "re-acute" the spinal cord -- that is, remove the "scar tissue" as Reynolds describes -- do you necessarily create the cellular conditions as an acute injury?
    Are the two equivalent?
    Wise
    We have now progressed beyond the point of having to re-injure the spinal cord to create conditions of growth. That was being suggested when we did not know what was going on in the spinal cord after injury.
    In most people, a second injury is likely to damage surviving axons and cause a more severe injury.
    Me
    Is the cord distal to the lesion in a chronic injury altered from its pre-injury state?
    Wise
    Yes, there is a lot of sprouting by local fibers that have taken over synaptic sites that have previously been occupied by descending fibers. The neurons in the lower spinal cord may also become hyper-excitable, resulting in spasticity.
    Me
    Thanks again for your time.
    Wise
    sure.
    thanks for posting this.
    T5/6, ASIA A, injured 30 Nov 08
    Future SCI Alumnus.
    I don't want to dance in the rain, I want to soar above the storm.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Norm's Avatar
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    yea how did he cure himself?
    "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

    -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

  3. #13
    Thanks for the conversation you had with Wise.

  4. #14
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    This guy Reynolds sued Wharton for the right to be called a Wharton graduate even though he graduated from some executive education program there, not the full business school. Wharton lost, Reynolds can call himself a "graduate". Now Wharton will appeal. Why does Spinal Cord Injury attract these quacks??????????

  5. #15
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    http://www.boston.com/business/techn...camp=obnetwork

    - A 1994 article in the Philadelphia Inquirer about spinal fusion surgery, "used widely to repair back problems," mentions Reynolds. It includes this passage:

    Frank Reynolds...was injured while loading a truck on the job in December 1991. Before undergoing surgery that involved a spinal fusion with pedicle screws at Pennsylvania Hospital in December 1992, Reynolds said he was told by his surgeon that ''you'll be back at work in six weeks. . . . He said I will play tennis, basketball and golf at full speed."
    - Asked about that article and the 1994 lawsuit, Reynolds replied in an e-mail, "The facts you sent me are wrong," and by phone told me that he was working as a psychotherapist at the time of his car accident.

    ***********

    What this implies is that Reynolds wasn't paralyzed in a car accident at all - total phony story. What this says is he was injured loading "TastyKakes" or some such sweet cake in 1991. A year later, in 1992, he underwent spinal fusion surgery to fix his injury. The surgery went bad, and three years later, in 1995, he sued everyone involved and made $750,000.
    Last edited by ip; 09-27-2010 at 07:18 PM.

  6. #16
    Ahh hell IP. That's disappointing.
    It's a little funny to imagine that guy playing basketball 'at full speed'.

  7. #17
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    I'm really disappointed too. I want to walk as much as the next guy. But I think we need to invest our money / time properly.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    Any cure claim that is made in association with the letters IPO should be viewed with skepticism. The same holds true with most any fund raising event that heralds a major scientific breakthrough to attract funds.

    While it is not what we want to hear, the present state of SCI cure science is in the poke and hope stage. Some very intelligent and dedicated people have some very informed guesses as to what might work. That's it. It will take both time and money to move closer to legitimate cure by trialing those scientific hunches.
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

  9. #19
    Foolish old, couldn't agree more.

  10. #20

    InVivo Team

    InVivo was founded based on research from Robert S. Langer Sc.D. of MIT’s Langer Lab and Yang (Ted) D. Teng, MD, PhD from Harvard’s Neurosurgery Department and VA Boston’s SCI Research Division. Dr. Langer and Dr. Teng, have worked together for over nine years, publishing their findings in peer reviewed journals, with the focused objective to provide novel therapeutic options for treating acute and chronic spinal cord injuries.

    Here's info on the current InVivo Therapeutics team.

    It's comprised of researchers who have received the highest honors and a number of successful business professionals who are working together to move this research forward.
    "Our lives begin to end the day
    we become silent about things that matter."
    - Martin Luther King Jr

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