Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
I found Wise on Facebook a few weeks ago and asked him for his comments. Here's the conversation:

Me
Hi Wise. Can you share a quick sentence or two re InVivo Therapuetics? The Reynolds TED presentation has created considerable excitement on CC and I was wondering whether the buzz equals the hype.
Wise
The company uses technology developed by the Langer lab and Ted Teng. I respect them. I haven't heard sufficient detail about their clinical trial in spinal cord injury to have any comments, however.
Me
Has their data not yet been published?
Wise
I am not sure that the polymer scaffold that they have is any better or worse than others. I don't know how they are going to implant the scaffold. In rats where they use the scaffold to connect the spinal cord but they haven't indicated how they plan to do this in human.
Wise
They are doing the monkey studies but those studies have not yet been published (at least I haven't seen it). They are good people and I am hopeful that they will come up with a good clinical trial proposal that I can support.
Me
My father -- who has no expertise re SCI research -- watched the video and was turned off by Reynold's "pitchman" presentation, particularly as it may be aimed toward the upcoming IPO -- not that you can comment.
Wise
Yes, unfortunately, all the best intentions are often subverted when money is involved.
Me
But Reynolds seemed to be suggesting that their 100% success in their primate studies was a first, hence all the excitement.
Wise
I have trouble imagining how they will implant a scaffold into the injury site of the spinal cord.
Me
OK. We'll all stay tuned. Thanks!
Wise
In animals, where you are creating the injury, you can use the scaffold to bridge a cut spinal cord. However, if you are doing this in a contused spinal cord, where do you cut and what do you remove in order to fit the scaffold in?
Me
One last Q: When it comes to treating chronics, if you "re-acute" the spinal cord -- that is, remove the "scar tissue" as Reynolds describes -- do you necessarily create the cellular conditions as an acute injury?
Are the two equivalent?
Wise
We have now progressed beyond the point of having to re-injure the spinal cord to create conditions of growth. That was being suggested when we did not know what was going on in the spinal cord after injury.
In most people, a second injury is likely to damage surviving axons and cause a more severe injury.
Me
Is the cord distal to the lesion in a chronic injury altered from its pre-injury state?
Wise
Yes, there is a lot of sprouting by local fibers that have taken over synaptic sites that have previously been occupied by descending fibers. The neurons in the lower spinal cord may also become hyper-excitable, resulting in spasticity.
Me
Thanks again for your time.
Wise
sure.
thanks for posting this.