Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33

Thread: How to tell if something is titanium

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Type Fran├žais View Post
    If it sinks in the ocean, it's titanium.
    Titanium, not Titanic

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by My395 View Post
    Titanium, not Titanic
    Aww, shit! Either I needed a sarcastic smiley or your sarcastic bone needs hitting. It was a pun.


  3. #13
    hmmm good question.
    C5/C6 Complete since 08/22/09

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by taziar View Post
    I like the scientific approach. Are titanium products pure or or some sort of alloy usually? Just curious.
    Depends the alloy, pure titanium have less stength, so that`s why they made alloys for differents uses.

    For example, titanium that tilite use is the Titanium GR 9 (3AL 2.5V)
    that is a 95% of titanium, 3% aluminium, 2.5% Vanadium.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
    I guess the most simple way to tell would be to take a magnet to the rims. If they are steel they will pull the magnet right toward them, if they are Titanium they will only very slightly draw the magnet towards them (if at all depending on the grade of Titanium) since Titanium is "Paramagnetic" http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_titanium_magnetic
    What if they are Alu? I still say looking at the colour is the easiest method!
    Last edited by sarcastrix; 09-22-2010 at 05:46 AM.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Them Bones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Tyngsborough, MA
    Posts
    1,042
    Possibly Ti6Al4V. But I would bet that it's the same as Tilite, like totol1 says. Industries seem to like a standard.

    • Grade 5, also known as Ti6Al4V, Ti-6Al-4V or Ti 6-4, is the most commonly used alloy. It has a chemical composition of 6% aluminium, 4% vanadium, 0.25% (maximum) iron, 0.2% (maximum) oxygen, and the remainder titanium.[3] Grade 5 is used extensively in Aerospace, Medical, Marine, and Chemical Processing.[4] It is used for connecting rods in ICEs. It is significantly stronger than commercially pure titanium while having the same stiffness and thermal properties.[5] Among its many advantages, it is heat treatable. This grade is an excellent combination of strength, corrosion resistance, weld and fabricability. In consequence, its uses are numerous such as for military aircraft or turbines. It is also used in surgical implants.[3] Generally, it is used in applications up to 400 degrees Celsius. Its properties are very similar to those of the 300 stainless steel series, especially 316.

    It has a density of roughly 4500 kg/m3, Young's modulus of 110 GPa, and tensile strength of 1000 MPa.[6] By comparison, annealed type 316 stainless steel has a density of 8000 kg/m3, modulus of 193 GPa, and tensile strength of only 570 MPa.[7] And tempered 6061 aluminium alloy has 2700 kg/m3, 69 GPa, and 310 MPa, respectively.[8]
    Grade 9 contains 3.0% aluminium and 2.5% vanadium. This grade is a compromise between the ease of welding and manufacturing of the "pure" grades and the high strength of Grade 5. It is commonly used in aircraft tubing for hydraulics and in athletic equipment.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium_alloy

  7. #17
    Here you`ve got a pic of a bit of titanium tube GR 9, without any treatment, compare the colour and the scrachtes, in titanium it will be difficult to have deep scrachtes because is a very hard material.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by radio_buddha View Post
    Chainsaw. If the chainsaw gets destroyed, it's titanium. :-)
    and if the handrim destroyed, dont worry, u can weld it almost in any workshop...
    walking is OVER-RATED!!!

    Broken in August 14th, 2003. T9-L1 complete.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by radio_buddha View Post
    Chainsaw. If the chainsaw gets destroyed, it's titanium. :-)
    and if the handrim destroyed, dont worry, u can weld it almost in any workshop...
    walking is OVER-RATED!!!

    Broken in August 14th, 2003. T9-L1 complete.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
    I guess the most simple way to tell would be to take a magnet to the rims. If they are steel they will pull the magnet right toward them, if they are Titanium they will only very slightly draw the magnet towards them (if at all depending on the grade of Titanium) since Titanium is "Paramagnetic" http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_titanium_magnetic
    stainless steel is non-magnetic

Similar Threads

  1. titanium axles
    By totoL1 in forum Equipment
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 10-09-2009, 04:12 PM
  2. Aluminum or Titanium??
    By carman767 in forum Equipment
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 08-22-2006, 07:27 PM
  3. Quickie Ti Titanium
    By jjs in forum Equipment & Services
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-21-2004, 09:27 AM
  4. titanium
    By SCOTTAGENCY in forum Care
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-06-2002, 06:42 AM
  5. titanium
    By SCOTTAGENCY in forum Cure
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-05-2002, 08:01 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •