Page 73 of 287 FirstFirst ... 23636465666768697071727374757677787980818283123173 ... LastLast
Results 721 to 730 of 2863

Thread: ChinaSCINet Update

  1. #721
    Oh, sorry, I must have auto access at Rutgers. I'm home now and can't access either. I'll get it for you tomorrow

  2. #722
    I should be ok if I just post the part of it-

    http://www.nature.com/sc/journal/v50...sc2011126a.pdf

    Efficacy and safety of lithium carbonate treatment of chronic spinal cord injuries: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Secondary outcomes
    The FIM motor scores, the VASs for pain and the MASs did not differ
    between the randomized groups at baseline.
    FIM motor score and the MAS for spasticity did not change after 6
    weeks intervention therapy and at the 6 months follow-up in both
    groups. The difference between the two groups was not significant.
    After 6 weeks of treatment, VAS pain scores in the lithium
    carbonate group were significantly greater than those in placebo
    group (1±3.97 vs 8.833±14.861; P¼0.034; Figure 5). This effect
    lasted for 6 months (Figure 6), 4 and half months after discontinuation
    of lithium therapy (0.778±17.176 vs 9.389±15.232; P¼0.041).

    In this double-blind, randomized trial, lithium did not change
    motor scores, sensory scores, ASIA Impairment Scales, FIM motor
    scores or theMAS for spasticity in 20 patients with chronic spinal cord
    injury compared with 20 patients who received placebo. This is not
    surprising, considering that regenerative therapies must ‘bridge’ the
    injury site, provide sustained growth factor support and inhibit axonal
    growth inhibitors known to be present in the spinal cord around the
    injury site. An individual therapy such as oral lithium may not be
    sufficient to regenerate the spinal cord.

    We worried that lithium may increase neuropathic pain in patients
    with chronic spinal cord injury. Neurotrophins have been implicated
    in neuropathic pain, particularly brain-derived neurotrophic factor15
    and nerve growth factor.16 In our study, about half of the subjects had
    severe neuropathic pain (VAS scores 450/100). To our surprise, the
    6-week course of oral lithium carbonate treatment markedly reduced
    VAS scores, not only at the end of the 6-week treatment period but
    also at the 6 months follow-up examination, 4 and a half months after
    the lithium was stopped. Lithium eliminated severe neuropathic pain
    of two patients, one with a thoracic and the other with cervical spinal
    cord injury.

    If this effect of lithium can be confirmed by further investigation,
    what are some potential mechanisms? In 2000, Shimizu et al.17
    reported that intrathecal lithium reduces neuropathic pain responses
    in a rat model of peripheral neuropathy. Lithium is used clinically to
    treat cluster headaches.18–21 However, lithium is not considered an
    analgesic,22 does not activate opioid receptors23 and may even
    aggravate pain by antagonizing cholecystokinin octapeptide reversal
    of opioid effects24 that may contribute to neuropathic pain after spinal
    cord injury.25 Lithium even facilitates endotoxin-mediated hyperalgesia
    behavior.26 Thus, lithium is unlikely to be acting through analgesic
    or a pain-behavior suppression mechanism.

    Several recent studies suggest that increasing neurotrophin levels in
    spinal cord injury or other neuropathic pain models may even alleviate
    neuropathic pain. For example, NGF,27 BDNF28 and NT329,30 all
    reduce neuropathic pain under certain conditions. It is also possible
    that neurotrophins need to be associated with inflammation in order
    to cause neuropathic pain. For example, Chen et al.31 found that
    immune activation is required for NT-3-induced axonal plasticity in
    chronic spinal cord injury. Finally, some neurotrophins may suppress
    sprouting. Ramer et al.32 found that endogenous TrkB ligands
    suppress sprouting and mechanosensory recovery in rats after dorsal
    root injuries.

    Lithium acts by inhibiting glycogen synthetase kinase 3-beta
    (GSK3B),33 which in turn inhibits nuclear factors that upregulate
    growth and survival genes in cells,34 including the nuclear factor of
    activated T cells (NFAT) and Wnt.35 Is GSK3b inhibition associated
    with relief of neuropathic pain?
    Xie et al.36 demonstrated that morphine-induced apoptosis
    in microglial cells is mediated via GSK-3beta and p38 MAPK
    pathways, while targeting microglial signaling might lead to
    more effective treatments for devastating chronic pain.37 Parkitna
    et al.38 reported that a single intrathecal injection of GSK3b
    inhibitor can restore the analgesic effect of morphine in morphinetolerant
    rats.

    Should the antidepressive effect of lithium explain its relief of
    chronic pain? Pain and depression are closely related. Depression
    can cause pain and pain can cause depression. Sometimes pain and
    depression create a vicious cycle in which pain worsens symptoms of
    depression, and then the resulting depression worsens feelings of
    pain.39 However, this reason cannot explain the effect lasting 1 and
    a half months after stopping medication.

    Safety and tolerability. The average serum lithium level of the lithium
    group after 3 days was 0.54mmol l1±0.152. (n¼19) and was
    0.68mmol l1±0.155 (n¼18) after 6 weeks. During the 6 weeks of
    intervention and 6 months follow-up, 16 subjects (80%) in the lithium
    carbonate and 14 subjects (70%) in the placebo group reported at least
    one adverse event (P¼0.465). The total number of adverse event
    reports differed between study groups: 56 versus 30 events in the
    lithium carbonate and placebo groups, respectively (P¼0.007). The
    common adverse event in the lithium group was nausea. No server
    side effects causing organ dysfunction were observed within the
    therapeutic lithium level.

    From Dr. Young-
    **Please note that about 10,000 people per year are admitted to the hospital with lithium toxicity because the population of patients who take lithium may not be taking the drug correctly. Of these, about 20% involve moderate to severe toxicity with central nervous system damage and cardiovascular collapse. So, this is not an innocuous drug.

  3. #723
    Wise, in the open house video from yesterday you mentioned that that there were patients in groups C and D that were up and walking.
    -how many patients in these groups in total have been treated, and out of those, how many are walking?
    -when you say walking, is that with support of a person, walker, crutches?
    -how many weeks or months has it been since they have been treated? and how long after treatment until they were able to start walking?
    -any signs of bowel,bladder,SF return in those patients?

  4. #724
    Quote Originally Posted by Barrington314mx View Post
    Wise, in the open house video from yesterday you mentioned that that there were patients in groups C and D that were up and walking.
    -how many patients in these groups in total have been treated, and out of those, how many are walking?
    -when you say walking, is that with support of a person, walker, crutches?
    -how many weeks or months has it been since they have been treated? and how long after treatment until they were able to start walking?
    -any signs of bowel,bladder,SF return in those patients?
    We have treated four subjects per group (C, D, and E). I was reporting personal observations and not the official results of the study. I don't know how many patients were walking in each group. Some patients are walking. I did not say (and do not want to say) how many patients were walking and at what level. I do not know how many have bowel, bladder, or sexual function. You will have to wait until all the data is collected and the information is published.

    Wise.

  5. #725
    Woah woah woah, Dr. Wise - just to clarify here. You just clearly stated that some patients are walking. Now I can wait until the actual results are published to get the specifics quantified, but let's keep it general for now: Are you implying that these people weren't walking before the treatment?

    I'm sure it was mentioned someplace in this lengthy thread what the initial ASIA scores were for these participants and whether they are chronics or not, but could someone save me some time and tell me?
    L2 incomplete with a pretty bad limp since 10/31/2011.

  6. #726
    Quote Originally Posted by shveddy View Post
    Woah woah woah, Dr. Wise - just to clarify here. You just clearly stated that some patients are walking. Now I can wait until the actual results are published to get the specifics quantified, but let's keep it general for now: Are you implying that these people weren't walking before the treatment?

    I'm sure it was mentioned someplace in this lengthy thread what the initial ASIA scores were for these participants and whether they are chronics or not, but could someone save me some time and tell me?
    They are all ASIA A chronic >1 year.
    http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/N...um+cord&rank=5

    Here is the link to the open house videos.
    http://www.ustream.tv/user/SCIProject

  7. #727
    Dr. Wise,

    Can you please tell more about Dr. Zhu Hui private hospital in Kunming. Any website?

    BTW - THANK YOU FOR THE LAST REPORT!!!
    www.MiracleofWalk.com

    Miracles are not contrary to nature, but only contrary
    to what we know about nature
    Saint Augustine

  8. #728
    Wow. Very nice open house.

    So which stock should be bought for the sake of Lithium?
    And the truth shall set you free.

  9. #729

    Dr Zhu's hospital

    Quote Originally Posted by comad View Post
    Dr. Wise,

    Can you please tell more about Dr. Zhu Hui private hospital in Kunming. Any website?

    BTW - THANK YOU FOR THE LAST REPORT!!!
    Hello,

    Although your question was for Dr Young I'll take the liberty of replying to the best of my ability. I had the privilege of meeting Dr Zhu and observing her walking programme last March. I also visited the new private hospital where she has since transferred her operation. The hospital is called Tongren Hospital and is part of a group of private hospitals in China owned by a Hong Kong businessman. The facility is brand new and was partially up and running when I visited. It is huge and modern. I was given a guided tour by the assistant general manager and it seemed to be well equipped with the latest medical hardware. I was shown the VIP rooms and VIP suites where I was told the overseas patients would stay -- good beds, accessible bathrooms, flat screen TVs, nicely decorated -- no cause for complaint. However, as I pointed out to Dr Zhu, most if not all of the overseas patients who will be interested in attending her walking programme will be chronically injured people who will not need or want to stay in a hospital room. They will be there for the rehab and apart from that will be "normal" people living in a "normal" way. As far as I could see the VIP rooms and suites were for the hospital as a whole, not just for Dr Zhu's patients, so one can assume that they will be accommodating very sick people, people recovering from surgery, etc., and needing a very quiet, very medicalised environment. I told Dr Zhu that the people who would be coming from overseas for the walking programme would probably be happier with another type of accommodation -- say apartments where they could share equipment and carers, cook, listen to music, etc. She has since written to me (my son is planning to attend her programme at the end of the summer) that she is planning on offering foreign patients pleasant, family-like living arrangements. I'm not sure what she has planned but I will be seeing her on June 12 and will get all the details from her.
    I cannot tell you how impressed I was with Dr Zhu and her team. Never have I seen a more caring, positive, altruistic person than Dr Zhu (apart from Wise Young of course!). Seeing her patients at various stages of walking was such an inspiration and I am convinced that her programme is the best next step for my son.
    I know so many of you will want to know more details -- cost and duration of the programme, what kind of nursing care and assistance can be provided, etc. I can't answer these questions now but will be finding out in the next few weeks. I'll share all the answers as soon as I have them.

  10. #730
    Thank you Dr. Young and everyone that has spent so much dedication to make this happen. Dr. Young, your speeches are so clear and easy to understand. You give many people so much to look forward to!

    I saved both of my childrens blood cord stem cell with Viacord. How would I find out if they are a match to mine? Would it be possible to use their cord blood in the future if they are a match? Would this cheapen the cost of having stem cell surgery if they were a good match? When the cord blood of both children was taken they only used one bag for each of them. I have been told once a bag has been opened the bag is no longer good. I can see a benefit for the cord blood companies to use more than one bag in case more than one use of the cord blood is needed.

    Can you provide the names of the doctors that will be doing the surgeries in Austin?

    You spoke about the cost of $120,000 for the therapy, which could be cut down to $60,000. Would this include the surgery, stem cell and the therapy? Once proven and used as a treatment in the US do you think this would this be the ball park cost of the total procedure and physical therapy to follow? I ask because currently my husband and I might avoid buying a house to save the money to afford to do this treatment thru a trial or after it is proven in case medicare doesn't cover the cost. I'm sure other SCI's out there would need some time to put that amount of money together.

    Your idea of a community walking program is wonderful! I think people would love to donate their time to physically helping a person walk! Couldn't the treatment facilities and your trial have waivers to avoid lawsuits? Once knee locking is established would water walking also help to reduce physical therapist costs and patient injuries? It seems like recovering patients could water walk without injury and without a physical therapist. I know there is alot of resistance in water walking but I don't know how much it retrains the SCI patient.

    Thanks again for all your hard work and dedication! You are amazing!
    Last edited by walkingagain; 06-02-2012 at 09:14 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. ChinaSCINET Update
    By Schmeky in forum Cure
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 06-16-2008, 06:25 PM
  2. ChinaSCINET on Schedule?
    By Schmeky in forum Cure
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-27-2008, 05:53 AM
  3. Dr. Young and ChinaSciNet
    By Imight in forum Cure
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 01-14-2008, 12:51 AM
  4. ChinaSCINET Schedule
    By Schmeky in forum Cure
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-11-2007, 04:30 AM
  5. ChinaSCINET, On Schedule?
    By Schmeky in forum Cure
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 01-30-2007, 03:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •