Thread: ChinaSCINet Update

  1. #1051
    Quote Originally Posted by Barrington314mx View Post
    why would you NOT do the intradural decompression while ur already in there on chronics? couldnt that effect results negatively if the cord is still compressed?
    Barrington, there is no reason to decompress the chronically injured cord! There is no pressure in the chronically injured spinal cord. Wise.

  2. #1052
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Barrington, there is no reason to decompress the chronically injured cord! There is no pressure in the chronically injured spinal cord. Wise.
    sorry, i just don't understand this. excuse my ignorance. what causes the pressure of the cord to begin with? and how does that pressure subside? in my original surgery when they put the rods in?

  3. #1053
    Senior Member khmorgan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrington314mx View Post
    sorry, i just don't understand this. excuse my ignorance. what causes the pressure of the cord to begin with? and how does that pressure subside? in my original surgery when they put the rods in?
    This is not an answer to your question, but an answer to a related question I had, i.e. "Why not always decompress?"

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showpos...25&postcount=2

  4. #1054
    Quote Originally Posted by Barrington314mx View Post
    sorry, i just don't understand this. excuse my ignorance. what causes the pressure of the cord to begin with? and how does that pressure subside? in my original surgery when they put the rods in?
    For several days or even weeks after injury, the spinal cord swells. The swelling results from cellular swelling. The pressure inside the spinal cord increase with swelling. When the pressure inside the spinal cord approaches or exceeds blood pressure in the arteries, blood flow slows or stops. This only occurs in acute and subacute spinal cord injury.

    Intradural decompression was developed and used by Dr. Zhu Hui and her team at the Kunming Army General to relieve pressure inside the spinal cord due to swelling in the days and weeks after spinal cord injury. Usually, in the United States, when they talk about decompression, they are referring to removing bone or disc compressing the spinal cord. They do not do intradural decompression in the U.S.

    In chronic spinal cord injury, the injury site is no longer swollen. There is no pressure at the injury site. Therefore, there is no reason to decompress.

    Wise.

  5. #1055
    Quote Originally Posted by khmorgan View Post
    This is not an answer to your question, but an answer to a related question I had, i.e. "Why not always decompress?"

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showpos...25&postcount=2
    I am afraid that we are mixing several issues. In the post that you referred to, I was saying that if there is something extradurally compressing the spinal cord (whether the person has an incomplete or complete spinal cord injury), the surgeons should decompress.

    Barrington314mx was asking about intradural decompression of chronic spinal cord injury. I said that chronic injured spinal cords do not have edema and therefore there is no reason to do intradural decompression of those spinal cords.

    Wise.

  6. #1056
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Intradural decompression was developed and used by Dr. Zhu Hui and her team at the Kunming Army General to relieve pressure inside the spinal cord due to swelling in the days and weeks after spinal cord injury. Usually, in the United States, when they talk about decompression, they are referring to removing bone or disc compressing the spinal cord. They do not do intradural decompression in the U.S.

    Wise.
    Why is this not done in the U.S.? Are surgeons here not trained to do that, Dr. Wise?

  7. #1057
    Quote Originally Posted by debbie1341 View Post
    Why is this not done in the U.S.? Are surgeons here not trained to do that, Dr. Wise?
    Debbie,

    Zhu Hui tried to publish this work in U.S. neurosurgery journals and they turned the paper down, saying that they don't believe the work.

    We have brought several U.S. surgeons to China to observe the procedure and they think that they can do the procedure. But, for the procedure to be adopted in America and Europe, phase 3 trials must be done to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the procedure.

    So, we are trying now to organize a phase 3 randomized clinical trial in China to test the procedure rigorously.

    Wise.

  8. #1058

    Smile

    wise,
    i have sci at c6-c7 since feb-2008. my present situation is my upper limbs are functioning good (90% as compred to normal person.), and i can feel the touch in my lower limbs and sometimes use reflexes according to my needs.. but i viewed your videos and got a hope i can walk again and live a normal life. what i am looking for is, where to get this stem cell therapy... will u treat patients in india or we have to come to china or somewhere else..??
    thanks a lot for rising hope to all the people with SCI.

  9. #1059
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Debbie,

    Zhu Hui tried to publish this work in U.S. neurosurgery journals and they turned the paper down, saying that they don't believe the work.

    We have brought several U.S. surgeons to China to observe the procedure and they think that they can do the procedure. But, for the procedure to be adopted in America and Europe, phase 3 trials must be done to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the procedure.

    So, we are trying now to organize a phase 3 randomized clinical trial in China to test the procedure rigorously.

    Wise.
    Thank you for your answer, doctor.
    I wish this had been an option 3 years ago when my husband was injured. He never had any kind of decompression, his doctor said he didn't need it.
    Every chronic is an acute at one time.
    If injuries could be lessened with this type of procedure, that could mean more resources for chronic injuries.
    Debbie

  10. #1060
    Quote Originally Posted by inderpreet View Post
    wise,
    i have sci at c6-c7 since feb-2008. my present situation is my upper limbs are functioning good (90% as compred to normal person.), and i can feel the touch in my lower limbs and sometimes use reflexes according to my needs.. but i viewed your videos and got a hope i can walk again and live a normal life. what i am looking for is, where to get this stem cell therapy... will u treat patients in india or we have to come to china or somewhere else..??
    thanks a lot for rising hope to all the people with SCI.
    I am continuing to discuss the possibility of doing a trial in 2013 in India with colleagues in India. I hope that we will do the trial in India. Much depends on whether or not we can get the funding.

    Wise.

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