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Thread: Partially paralyzed dog regains use of legs after experimental procedure

  1. #1
    Senior Member Jeremy's Avatar
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    Partially paralyzed dog regains use of legs after experimental procedure

    Partially paralyzed dog regains use of legs after experimental procedure
    August 13, 2001, 12:43 PM


    ROCKFORD, Mich. (AP) -- A dog whose rear legs were paralyzed after being struck by a car has regained the use of the legs through an experimental procedure.

    The medical progress of the dog, named Duke, is being analyzed as part of an ongoing clinical trial involving canines at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.

    "Duke's rate of recovery was dramatic and much quicker than we had expected," said Dr. Peter Laverty, a clinical instructor and researcher at Purdue's Center for Paralysis Research.

    The fact that the German shorthaired pointer is alive and healthy is nothing short of a miracle to his owners, Craig and Theresa Mabie of Rockford, about 10 miles northeast of Grand Rapids.

    "He still has a really good nose, and I go hunting with him until he gets tired," Craig Mabie told The Grand Rapids Press for a story Monday.

    Duke's remarkable journey started one day late last November. Nathan Mabie had gone by his parents' home to pick up their dogs -- Duke, then 7 months old, and Duke's mother, Hershey -- to romp around while he looked for a Christmas tree.

    At the tree farm, both dogs caught a scent and took off down the road, where Duke was struck by a vehicle that did not stop. Mabie headed for the nearest animal hospital he could find, the Great Lakes Veterinary Complex, and his mother met him there moments later.

    Dr. Kirsten Marshall, the veterinarian who was on call, said X-rays of Duke's lumbar vertebrae "looked like a stair step" and the dog's bruised spinal cord caused him to lose all motor movement in his back legs.

    Though the prognosis is grim for dogs with such injuries -- many owners opt for euthanasia -- Marshall suggested that the family contact a veterinary neurosurgeon. They found help at Purdue's School of Veterinary Medicine.

    Coincidentally, the school's Center for Paralysis Research was preparing to conduct a clinical trial using dogs with spinal injuries.

    The treatment involved injecting them with the chemical polyethylene glycol, or PEG, a compound commonly found in detergent, antifreeze and cosmetics. Scientists have known for 20 years that PEG can repair damaged cell membranes by coating them with a protective film that seals holes formed by disease or trauma.

    It has been used successfully on humans with other ailments, but not to repair spinal cord tissue. Trials on guinea pigs by Purdue researchers showed promise, but an experiment using larger animals was needed before the therapy could be cleared for humans with spinal cord injuries.

    Clinical trials involving humans are expected to begin next year.

    When Duke arrived at the university, he was given a dose of PEG, and stainless steel plates and screws were used to hold his fractured spine together. A second surgery was needed and another round of PEG was administered.

    Within a few days, small motor movements had returned to the dog's hind legs; two months later, he was released to the Mabies, still unable to walk. The family took turns working his legs in circular motions three times a day and fashioned a makeshift sling of bandages to hold his hind quarters during walks outside.

    By spring, Duke was placing his full weight on his back legs. His back is bony and rippled due to the bone cement used to repair his spine, but he's back out in the woods again, running and pointing out game.

    ------


    Center for Paralysis Research at Purdue University's School of Veterinary Medicine, http://www.vet.purdue.edu/cpr/

  2. #2
    "Scientists have known for 20 years that PEG can repair damaged cell membranes by coating them with a protective film that seals holes formed by dsease or trauma", but they forgot.

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    bla

    It's experimental until somebody pours enough money into it to get through a trial. i get the feeling that only now are investors beginning to believe that spinal cord injury treatments are a good investment.

    Eric Texley

  4. #4
    Dimitriy, you are right. Also, PEG may be a good antioxidant. I think that it also should have a major role in the repair of peripheral nerves. Wise.

  5. #5

    Eric

    There will probably be minimal industry investment in PEG because it is such a common chemical and it will be very difficult for any pharmaceutical company to gain exclusive control and therefore profit from this technology. However, this is something that can be used with surgeons without the involvement of companies. I think that PEG will be used more and more by surgeons as they realize the special properties of the molecules. By the way, there are many types of PEG and this may be one way that a company might be able to develop a product, that is specifically designed to maximize neuroprotection and also resealing of membranes.

    Wise.

  6. #6
    12/5/2004Study on dogs yields hope in human paralysis treatment
    Study Findings:

    Researchers have successfully tested injections of a liquid polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG), to heal spinal injuries in dogs in an experiment that also offers hope for preventing human paralysis.
    If administered within 72 hours of serious spinal injury, was able to prevent three out of four dogs in a test group from suffering permanent spinal damage. Even when the spine was damaged to the point of paralysis, the PEG solution prevented nerve cells from rupturing irreversibly, allowing them to heal themselves.
    PEG is able to stop this cascade of injury by repairing initial membrane damage, or by fusing two damaged cells together into a larger functional nerve cell. Significantly, the polymer is attracted only to damaged nerve cells and tissue when it's injected into the blood stream. It doesn't move into undamaged regions nearby.
    Nearly 75 percent of the dogs treated with PEG were able to resume a normal life. More than half the dogs (in the PEG group) in this study were standing or walking within two weeks of treatment. In most cases, you could notice positive signs within three to five days. Some healed so well that they could go on as though nothing had happened. These results are unprecedented in paralysis research.
    Related Articles:
    __________________________________________

    Dr. Young,

    How do you feel this will help those of us who have been injured for many years?

    thanks & Gods speed~
    Susan

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    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Spinal Healing

    Spinal Healing
    Research offers hope for spinal injuries.

    More...

    Clumsy Canines

    Dog DNA Assembled

    Winter Watchdog

    A successful method for healing spinal injuries in dogs has been developed by Purdue University researchers.

    Lab tests have shown that an injection of a liquid polymer known as polyethylene glycol (PEG), if administered within 72 hours of serious spinal injury, can prevent most dogs from suffering permanent spinal damage. Even when the spine is initially damaged to the point of paralysis, the PEG solution prevents the nerve cells from rupturing irrevocably, enabling them to heal themselves. "Nearly 75 per cent of the dogs we treated with PEG were able to resume a normal life," said Professor Richard Borgens, director of the Center for Paralysis Research in Purdue's School of Veterinary Medicine. "Some healed so well that they could go on as though nothing had happened."

    The research, performed at Purdue Indiana University and Texas A&M University, appeared in the Journal of Neurotrauma.

    In the study, 19 paraplegic dogs between 2 and 8 years of age were treated with a PEG injection within 72 hours of their injury as an addition to the standard veterinary therapy for spinal injury. This standard treatment includes injection of steroids, physical rehabilitation with swimming, and surgical removal of any offending chips of bone remaining in the spinal area after injury. This group of 19 was compared with a second group of 24 dogs

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    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    I would think some company might put out a decently marketable form for humans type of PEG. You know, sterile, it doesn't travel from the site of application, etc. PEG when taken orally shuts down a dog's kidneys rapidly.

    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

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    That's right go and heal a dog, make it's life better, but wait 15 years to treat a fuckin' HUMAN BEING! Fuck Fido, if you guys were sick enough to cripple him, you should've taken the "Old Yellar" method and put the poor bastard down in a shed.

    sherman brayton

  10. #10
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Originally posted by brayton:

    Fuck Fido, if you guys were sick enough to cripple him, you should've taken the "Old Yellar" method and put the poor bastard down in a shed.

    Chill, Sherman. The Center For Paralysis Research at the Purdue School of Veterinary Medicine only accepts naturally injured dogs into their programs. In this case Duke was hit by a car. Purdue is also the only place I know of that has gotten drugs or devices to human trial first. Like 4-AP and a device that is implanted and uses electrical impulses to guide the growth of new cells within the cord. They get the problem to large mammal trials and then companies take it from there. Due to this the Governor of Indiana, with no promting from us gimps, added $2 million a year to the state budget for this one research center.

    You can check the place out at:

    http://www.vet.purdue.edu/cpr/

    To me, sending a dog home with little to no disability after a major accident or disc problem is a major bonus in the war on human paralysis.

    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

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