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Thread: Dr. Wise. Some questions

  1. #1

    Dr. Wise. Some questions

    Hello everyone.
    My question is something specific, so it is directed to Dr. Wise, but if anyone else knows the answer would greatly appreciate your help.

    I read that when spinal cord injury occurs, axons that have been damaged and thus separated from their cell bodies die. Then, theoretically, sensory axons die from the point of injury up and motor axons from the injury down. So we have to rebuild all the way from the injury up to the brain to bring sensation, and down to bring motor signals. Is that it?
    So what happens to all sensory neurons up the injury and all the motor neurons down the injury? Do these neurons die too only because the activity has ceased?
    For a treatment to be effective it only has to make the axon grow to its target?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Lissa, good post. I and am sure others don't know the extent of our injuries with repsect to what is left, what has to be repaired, and what can be repaired. I hope that this next year will allow us to be evaluated for treatments that work. Dr Young will begin his trials, I'm sure, and I hope will yield positive results.

  3. #3
    Dr. Wise, could you resolve my doubt?
    No one can help me with the question?

    Thank you.

  4. #4
    Lisaa,

    See here.

    Steven
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  5. #5
    Steven, thanks for your response. I read this message before asking here just in case i found any old information about it.

    This didn't make me aware of the answer i'm looking for so i wrote this one, hoping that Dr. Wise can clarify what happens with this situation a little more specific.

    In this message Dr. Wise only talks about axonal growth after the injury... and that's where my doubts are: What happens to all sensory neurons up the injury and all the motor neurons down the injury, why do all they die? Do these neurons die too only because the activity has ceased?
    For a treatment to be effective it only has to make the axon grow to its target? In the sensory ways that means growing back into the brain?

    Thank you!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by lisaa View Post
    Steven, thanks for your response. I read this message before asking here just in case i found any old information about it.

    This didn't make me aware of the answer i'm looking for so i wrote this one, hoping that Dr. Wise can clarify what happens with this situation a little more specific.

    In this message Dr. Wise only talks about axonal growth after the injury... and that's where my doubts are: What happens to all sensory neurons up the injury and all the motor neurons down the injury, why do all they die? Do these neurons die too only because the activity has ceased?
    For a treatment to be effective it only has to make the axon grow to its target? In the sensory ways that means growing back into the brain?

    Thank you!
    lisa,

    Neurons above and below the injury site tend to survive the injury and some may die. If injury is very close to the neurons, some neuron may die. There may also be some atrophy of the neurons that have had their axons injured. For example, many investigators have studied rubrospinal neurons and find that the neurons look shrunken and some may have died after injury to the spinal cord.

    On the other hand, I have seen evidence that axons from neurons above and below the spinal continue to try to grow across the injury site many years after injury. The first time that I saw this were in some spinal cord specimens that Dick Bunge at the Miami Project was looking at. There were large number of "terminal bulbs" or frustrated growth cones at the edge of the injury site of a woman who had died about 20 years after injury.

    In animals, we know that there is no significant loss of neurons in the lower spinal cord after an injury to the thoracic spinal cord. Although some early studies suggested that there may be neuronal death far below the injury site or in brain neurons that send axons down the spinal cord, there is no credible data that such death occurs all or even most of the time in animals. On the other hand, injuries to the lower thoracic spinal cord can result in damage to neurons in the lumbosacral cord. Of course cervical spinal cord injury can cause damage to neurons in the cervical spinal cord.

    If a person has strong spasticity, this is strong evidence that there are plenty of neurons in the spinal cord segments that are exhibiting spasticity. That is why I often tell people not to take so much baclofen or anti-spasticity drugs, saying that spasticity is not necessarily bad. Whether spasticity or spasms are beneficial is not clear but its presence indicates that the neurons are alive and kicking. If I were spinal-injured, I would rather have spasticity than not. But, the absence of spasticity does not necessarily mean that all the neurons in the flaccid limbs are gone. It simply means that the number of surviving neurons is too small or too inhibitory to allow excitability of the cells in the lumbosacral cord. This may improve by injection of neurons or neural precursor cells.

    Wise.

    Wise.

  7. #7
    Senior Member khmorgan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    If I were spinal-injured, I would rather have spasticity than not.
    Dr. Young, I agree with you, but whenever I hear a statement like that, I'm reminded of the late Peter Sellers in the following scene from Dr. Strangelove: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iesXUFOlWC0

    This is me without muscle relaxants.

  8. #8
    Wise, I have to agree about spacticity and baclofin. I have spacsticity and hope that that is a reason to believe in some treatment for my disease. I take a minumum amount of baclofin and look forward to getting spasticity to turm to fundtionality.

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