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Thread: Scientists find most massive star ever discovered

  1. #1

    Scientists find most massive star ever discovered

    ever discovered — hundreds of times more massive than the sun, scientists said Wednesday after working out its weight for the first time.
    Those behind the find say the star, called R136a1, may once have weighed as much as 320 [COLOR=#366388 !important][COLOR=#366388 !important]solar [COLOR=#366388 !important]masses[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR]. Astrophysicist Paul Crowther said the obese star — twice as heavy as any previously discovered — has already slimmed down considerably over its lifetime.


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100721/...massive_star_4

  2. #2
    Nice photo to accompany the piece.


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  4. #4
    Not to sound like a total nerd, but would it be amazing to travel there and see that from a safe distance! The sheer size of that star is incomprehensible.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jhope View Post
    Not to sound like a total nerd, but would it be amazing to travel there and see that from a safe distance! The sheer size of that star is incomprehensible.
    That isn't nerdy. I think it would be amazing to be able to see all these things up-close without dying.


  6. #6
    Senior Member JimD's Avatar
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    Very effective short video showing the relative sizes of the planets, our sun and certain other stars:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lllwZ6M-L9w

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  8. #8
    Senior Member JimD's Avatar
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    As long as we're discussing mind-blowing images:


  9. #9
    Senior Member JimD's Avatar
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    The image above is called the Hubble Deep Field image - each point of light is not a star, but rather an individual galaxy!

    From Wikipedia:

    The Hubble Deep Field (HDF) is an image of a small region in the constellation Ursa Major, constructed from a series of observations by the Hubble Space Telescope. It covers an area 2.5 arcminutes across, two parts in a million of the whole sky, which is equivalent in angular size to a 65 mm tennis ball at a distance of 100 metres. The image was assembled from 342 separate exposures taken with the Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 over ten consecutive days between December 18 and December 28, 1995.
    The field is so small that only a few foreground stars in the Milky Way lie within it; thus, almost all of the 3,000 objects in the image are galaxies, some of which are among the youngest and most distant known. By revealing such large numbers of very young galaxies, the HDF has become a landmark image in the study of the early universe, with the associated scientific paper having received over 800 citations by the end of 2008.
    Three years after the HDF observations were taken, a region in the south celestial hemisphere was imaged in a similar way and named the Hubble Deep Field South. The similarities between the two regions strengthened the belief that the universe is uniform over large scales and that the Earth occupies a typical region in the universe (the cosmological principle). A wider but shallower survey was also made as part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey. In 2004 a deeper image, known as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), was constructed from a total of eleven days of observations. The HUDF image is the deepest (most sensitive) astronomical image ever made at visible wavelengths.

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    I know this may be an absurd question to ask, but do scientists speculate what it's like to reach the universe's end? Is its end tangible? Also, is reaching the end impossible because the universe is ever-expanding?

    Cheers! I ask only simple things.


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