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Thread: tilite ZR allen screws

  1. #1

    tilite ZR allen screws

    anyone knows the specifications for the (four in total) allen screws that secure the camber clamps to the center of gravity bracket?

    two of them were overtightened and partially damaged even before i have tried to remove them. now they are stripped, and still in. will be a fun day tomorrow. they are button head bolts. my plan is to replace them with socket head bolts. hoping that they are more torque resistant. should i get titanium ones?

    thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    found the info here:
    http://estore.tilite.com/ecommerce/P...nd%20Axles.pdf
    on page 12.

    the tilite part no. is HD100080, and they are
    1/4-28 x 1" button head cap screws

    the allen wrench size is 5/32"

  3. #3
    If you want to switch to a 3/16 Allen and a screw which is less likely to strip, I recommended the following socket head cap screw from McMaster-Carr...

    92200A586
    1/4"-28 x 1"L Military Spec 300 Series Stainless Steel Socket Head Cap Screw

    Getting the right strength is important with this particular fastener on the ZR because it is subject to fairly high stress. The first time I swapped out fasteners, I used regular 18-8 stainless cap screws and they warped. One actually sheared off inside the threaded portion of the frame. Fortunately, I was able to get it out. The 300 Series Military spec screws won't warp. They cost $9.51 for 5, but they are worth the investment.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    If you want to switch to a 3/16 Allen and a screw which is less likely to strip, I recommended the following socket head cap screw from McMaster-Carr...

    92200A586
    1/4"-28 x 1"L Military Spec 300 Series Stainless Steel Socket Head Cap Screw

    Getting the right strength is important with this particular fastener on the ZR because it is subject to fairly high stress. The first time I swapped out fasteners, I used regular 18-8 stainless cap screws and they warped. One actually sheared off inside the threaded portion of the frame. Fortunately, I was able to get it out. The 300 Series Military spec screws won't warp. They cost $9.51 for 5, but they are worth the investment.
    yes, want to switch to 3/16 allen. i willl order them right away. from the pic, it looks like you have ditched the lock washer? aren't these a bit long? on the original ones the thread length is 7/8".
    thanks for the tip!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by zz View Post
    anyone knows the specifications for the (four in total) allen screws that secure the camber clamps to the center of gravity bracket?

    two of them were overtightened and partially damaged even before i have tried to remove them. now they are stripped, and still in. will be a fun day tomorrow. they are button head bolts. my plan is to replace them with socket head bolts. hoping that they are more torque resistant. should i get titanium ones?

    thanks in advance.
    If they're stripped, try using a small, very sharp chisel and tapping it in counter clockwise on the head. I'm managed to remove a lot of wiped out bolts this way.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by zz View Post
    anyone knows the specifications for the (four in total) allen screws that secure the camber clamps to the center of gravity bracket?

    two of them were overtightened and partially damaged even before i have tried to remove them. now they are stripped, and still in. will be a fun day tomorrow. they are button head bolts. my plan is to replace them with socket head bolts. hoping that they are more torque resistant. should i get titanium ones?

    thanks in advance.
    I guess I didn't read the whole post last night. I didn't realize you already planned to do what I suggested. While you may already know this, it is also a good idea to remove the camber tube from the clamp to ensure there are no non-linear forces exerted against the screws as you turn them.

    With that bolt that sheared off inside my frame, I tried drilling it out. Fortunately, the first time the bit got stuck in the remaining portion of screw, the torque of the drill started turning it clockwise until it came out on the other side of the frame.

    The 1" length socket head cap screws don't protrude at all. I ditched the lock washers because they didn't seem necessary. If you plan many future adjustments, you may want to use them.

    Since that incident, I've also made it a practice to replace the existing screw with a fresh one after any adjustment because stress on the fastener can cause metal fatigue.

    As a result of my "incident", the threads in a couple of the holes on my frame may have sustained mild damage. I now have to turn the Allen wrench very slowly because a lot of torque is required. There is a loud squeak with each turn and I can feel heat being generated. Unlike aluminum, titanium's hardness means new threads can't be "created" simply by torquing down harder on a fastener.

    I still worry about shearing them off if I have to remove them (and not being as lucky as I was last time), but the military spec stainless screws have been up to the task. Still, it is comforting to know I probably won't have to adjust my COG again.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    I guess I didn't read the whole post last night. I didn't realize you already planned to do what I suggested. While you may already know this, it is also a good idea to remove the camber tube from the clamp to ensure there are no non-linear forces exerted against the screws as you turn them.

    With that bolt that sheared off inside my frame, I tried drilling it out. Fortunately, the first time the bit got stuck in the remaining portion of screw, the torque of the drill started turning it clockwise until it came out on the other side of the frame.

    The 1" length socket head cap screws don't protrude at all. I ditched the lock washers because they didn't seem necessary. If you plan many future adjustments, you may want to use them.

    Since that incident, I've also made it a practice to replace the existing screw with a fresh one after any adjustment because stress on the fastener can cause metal fatigue.

    As a result of my "incident", the threads in a couple of the holes on my frame may have sustained mild damage. I now have to turn the Allen wrench very slowly because a lot of torque is required. There is a loud squeak with each turn and I can feel heat being generated. Unlike aluminum, titanium's hardness means new threads can't be "created" simply by torquing down harder on a fastener.

    I still worry about shearing them off if I have to remove them (and not being as lucky as I was last time), but the military spec stainless screws have been up to the task. Still, it is comforting to know I probably won't have to adjust my COG again.
    Why not run a thread chaser though those damaged holes to clean up the threads?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustyjames View Post
    Why not run a thread chaser though those damaged holes to clean up the threads?
    Two questions...

    1. What is a thread chaser?

    2. Is it strong enough to work if the threads are titanium?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    Two questions...

    1. What is a thread chaser?

    2. Is it strong enough to work if the threads are titanium?
    You can repair the threads with that thing of the pic, i think they are thread chaser, i don`t know their name in english.
    Is a very easy job, they usually come three and you can see in the pic the difference between their threads, i put you the number which have to go first, you have to repair it first with number 1, after 2 and 3, you will need another tool for turn them into your thread holes, you have to buy them with the same diameter of your bolts, i don`t know your US metrical, but that bolts are M6, so you will need ones with 6mm diameter.

    That piece you`ve got in your pic with the bolts is aluminium, so if the problems is in that threads there`s no problem because you buy them for repair normal metals and is cheap.
    But if you`ve got the problem in the threads in the titanium frame that is behind that aluminium piece maybe you can repair it with them if you only have to repair it a bit, but if they are very damage you will have to use a Titanium GR5 or Cobalts thread chasers, and they are very expensive.
    So it will be better to take it to a turner.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by totoL1 View Post
    You can repair the threads with that thing of the pic, i think they are thread chaser, i don`t know their name in english.
    A tap.
    C5-6 Complete - 8/13/1982

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