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Thread: Is this true?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    Question Is this true?

    Discrepancies in labeling Cacium can be deceptive and make people believe they are getting more calcium than they think they are. Unless the ingredients are in brackets ( ) you are only getting a fraction of the ingredient, e.g. Calcium Citrate 1000 mg is the same as Calcium (Citrate) 210 mg.


    http://www.4alw.com/liquid-minerals/product.htm

  2. #2
    and you need Calcium with Vitamin D and you need to make sure your Vitamin D levels are normal
    CWO

  3. #3
    I've been reading a lot about what are clinically acceptable Vit. D levels in the blood. It seems that what was once thought a reasonable Vit. D level in the blood is no longer enough. Check with your doc but mine is saying that 2000 to 3000 mg of Vit. D daily supplement is the new recommendation. None of us can get enough sun or drink/eat enough Vit. D fortified foods to achieve this level of intake.

  4. #4
    the body needs vit d to absorb calcium. i take both.
    lola
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing" ~ edmund burker

    c4-5 quad

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    Thanks all of you!

    CWO my Vit D is low and I'm going to start getting at least 15 mins a day.
    I know sunshine beats supplements.
    I've been taking Vit D & magnesium with my calcium.
    But evidently I'm not absorbing it.
    So #1 Sunshine!

    #2 I'm going to buy some isotonic liquid calcium.
    In hopes I absorb it better.
    I'm trying to get the amount right.
    I need to know how to figure out the ESSENTIAL Calcium in a supplement.

    Therefore I need to understand this:

    Discrepancies in labeling Cacium can be deceptive and make people believe they are getting more calcium than they think they are. Unless the ingredients are in brackets ( ) you are only getting a fraction of the ingredient, e.g. Calcium Citrate 1000 mg is the same as Calcium (Citrate) 210 mg.


    http://www.4alw.com/liquid-minerals/product.htm
    Can anyone help me understand this?
    Thanks ~

  6. #6

    The Stoichiometry of Calcium Citrate

    I believe that this is the explanation to your query:

    There for every 1000 milligrams of Calcium Citrate, there are about 212 milligrams of Calcium. There are 3 molecules of calcium (with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole) and the total molecular weight of calcium citrate is 571 g/mole. So, divide 40 x 3 = 120 by 571 g and you come up with 0.205 (which is close to the 212). Multiply .212 times 1000 mg and you get 212 milligrams of calcium per 1000 mg of calcium citrate.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coltech88 View Post
    I believe that this is the explanation to your query:

    There for every 1000 milligrams of Calcium Citrate, there are about 212 milligrams of Calcium. There are 3 molecules of calcium (with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole) and the total molecular weight of calcium citrate is 571 g/mole. So, divide 40 x 3 = 120 by 571 g and you come up with 0.205 (which is close to the 212). Multiply .212 times 1000 mg and you get 212 milligrams of calcium per 1000 mg of calcium citrate.

    Thanks coltech88. I some what understand the equation.
    Another question. The statement I made was making reference to the parenthesis around (citrate). Stating there was more elemential calcium if it had parenthesis around it calcium (citrate) 1000 mg. opposed to one just stating calcium citrate 1000 mg. Is that true?

    Also WELCOME TO CARECURE!!! Mona

  8. #8

    Calcium citrate

    Mona:

    Calcium citrate will have 21.2% calcium (or less if there are filler agents) regardless of the labeling. So, look at the dosage levels on the bottle and breakdown of the ingredients to make sure that you are specifically getting the amount of calcium supplementation that you want.

    The FDA regulates the labeling of "dietary supplements," so all of the ingredients should be on the label. So, if there are additives (fillers) such as starch, you should see that listed among the ingredients. You can do your own calculations of the percentage of each ingredient by using the figures on the label.

    Below is a link to some answers to FAQS about FDA requirements for supplement labeling if you are interested in pursuing that further.

    http://www.fda.gov/food/dietarysuppl.../ucm110417.htm

    If you still have questions, attach a photo of the specific product that you are using and I will look at it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    A study just released has linked calcium supplements to increased heart attack risk.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  10. #10
    I just read that too. Great. But the test patients were all elderly and they didn't say how much calcium they were taking.

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