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Thread: Shirataki Noodles! - MUST TRY

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Edwards View Post
    Any progress on this front?
    As in losing weight? Yup! Very much so.
    C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

  2. #22
    I've eaten these types of noodles my whole life, and they come in many forms. I don't know about the Lewis posted, but I don't like any noodles packages in water. You can get many of these noodles at Asian markets, tho I think I've seen them in regular ones too in specialty or ethnic aisles.

    As far cal content, not all soluble fiber are alike, but you can get lots of low cal. highly nutritious soluble fiber from everyday easy to find fruits, veggies (listen up Steven!), nuts, beans, etc.

    Back to these noodles -- they are mainly a sort of emulsified product (like how liquids become gelatinous or thickened with corn starch). Being extremely low cal. I described to a friend how they are made from plant roots (I'm familiar with yam root or potato starch). While trying to describe how it can be so little cal. to someone, I basically used trees/wood as an example (as much of the additive is found in wood) - eg. there is the insoluble fiber (tree bark) and the soluble fiber (the pulp), the small bit of pulp is emulsified to thicken and solidify a lot of water; it breaks down easy but stays in your system longer so you feel full (or bloated) longer.

    Doesn't sound good? Dunno, it doesn't have much taste, but it takes on flavors well and you can make many dishes with them. I love cellophane noodles, "a type of transparent Asian noodle made from starch (such as mung bean starch, yam, potato starch, cassava or canna starch), and water", which come dried and cooks very quickly. I don't think these have a smell to them.

    "In Korean cuisine, glass noodles are usually made from sweet potato starch and are called dangmyeon (hangul: 당면; hanja: 唐麵; literally "Tang noodles"; also spelled dang myun, dangmyun, tang myun, or tangmyun). They are commonly stir-fried in sesame oil with beef and vegetables, and flavoured with soy and sugar, in a popular dish called japchae (hangul: 잡채). They are usually thick, and are a brownish-gray color when in their uncooked form."

    Photos of this dish
    (which can be made different, depending on what you put in - all veggie, or chicken instead of beef, etc.)


    And...


    The dish of second pic described further in this blog


    If anyone is interested in trying this dish, or any dish containing these types of noodles, I'd suggest trying them at some restaurants, especially if you have no idea how to prepare them as a meal, before buying and preparing them yourself. But you have to be mindful, whether you make them yourself or order at a restaurant, fat and calories are going to depend a lot on what goes in and how it's prepared.
    Last edited by chick; 07-17-2010 at 11:52 AM.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by chick View Post
    I don't know about the Lewis posted, but I don't like any noodles packages in water.
    That's the way Shirataki noodles come. Unlike Cellophane noodles there are virtually no calories with Shirataki, yet Shirataki noodles are very similar to Cellophane noodles.

    Quote Originally Posted by chick View Post
    But you have to be mindful, whether you make them yourself or order at a restaurant, fat and calories are going to depend a lot on what goes in and how it's prepared.
    Totally agree!
    C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Lewis View Post
    As in losing weight? Yup! Very much so.
    Awesome news!

    chick, I'm spreading my wings; I tried olives today. Despite their tartness, I may be able to eat them.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  5. #25
    An Asian market here carries them! Flavored and pre-cooked. Is that normal?
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Edwards View Post
    An Asian market here carries them! Flavored and pre-cooked. Is that normal?
    Don't know! Hmm... try'em
    C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

  7. #27
    I'm with Shannan—too rubbery. Is there a way to cook them so the texture is more pasta-like?
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

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