Page 7 of 13 FirstFirst 12345678910111213 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 124

Thread: Spinal Cord Injury Site "Scar Tissue"

  1. #61
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    6,714
    How do I talk a neurosurgeon into doing surgery?
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by alan View Post
    How do I talk a neurosurgeon into doing surgery?
    Alan,

    Are you referring to surgery to untether the spinal cord, i.e. removing the adhesions between the spinal cord and surrounding arachnoid membranes? Most neurosurgeons are reluctant to do this operation without clear evidence of progressive deficits that could be attributed to tethering. Several neurosurgeons have reported that untethering of the spinal cord and restoring cerebrospinal fluid flow in the subarachnoid space will improve function in chronic spinal cord injury.

    Wise.

  3. #63
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    11,007
    And what do you two, Wise and Jerry, call the area surrounding my spinal infarct that 4-AP jumped fairly well? With no breakage, smashing, cutting or surgery what happens when just ischemia is present and with such a tiny little thread of damage showing on MRIs which treatment should I be tossing my money at after so many years? Currently I tend to think the Europeans may be closer to a functional recovery trial for some of us that no one mentions like infarcts, cenral cord syndrome and one time TM.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  4. #64
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    6,714
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Alan,

    Are you referring to surgery to untether the spinal cord, i.e. removing the adhesions between the spinal cord and surrounding arachnoid membranes? Most neurosurgeons are reluctant to do this operation without clear evidence of progressive deficits that could be attributed to tethering. Several neurosurgeons have reported that untethering of the spinal cord and restoring cerebrospinal fluid flow in the subarachnoid space will improve function in chronic spinal cord injury.

    Wise.
    Along with the ongoing increases in pains over time, my arms have gotten weaker, and harder to control, and sensation in them changes (right arm faster than left.) The extreme pain in my upper back, along with my sticking shoulder blades, play a role. The neurosurgeons see no tethering on the MRIs, but definite changes in the injured area between 2001 and 2010/11.

    My typing ability is going down the tubes.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  5. #65
    Dr. Wise a question. My husbands' MRI 4 months post surgery states a high T2 spinal cord signal measuring 7X6mm increased in size compared to prior exam at the level of C4. No cord compression noted. Is this indicative/evidence of gliosis?

    What exactly does this mean and what are the effects on the body? Thank you, for your time.
    Last edited by MichelePaula; 01-06-2013 at 09:47 PM.

  6. #66
    Dr. Silver and Dr. Young: I am extremely interested in seeing each of your's reply to Sue Pendleton's question above (post #63).
    I too had no traumatic injury. Neurologist at University of Texas Medical Center in Dallas told me, in 1997, that a blood vessel had hemorrhaged in the spinal cord. He explained that the resulting inflammation had damaged the cord. I am T10, have not rergaind any sensory and no practical motor (able to move left leg and foot slightly). As Sue said, I would like to know which treatment to support.........thank you, Fred
    Last edited by fourwhlhntr; 01-06-2013 at 11:06 PM. Reason: to correct post # that I referenced

  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by Sue Pendleton View Post
    And what do you two, Wise and Jerry, call the area surrounding my spinal infarct that 4-AP jumped fairly well? With no breakage, smashing, cutting or surgery what happens when just ischemia is present and with such a tiny little thread of damage showing on MRIs which treatment should I be tossing my money at after so many years? Currently I tend to think the Europeans may be closer to a functional recovery trial for some of us that no one mentions like infarcts, cenral cord syndrome and one time TM.
    Sue,

    Therapies that remyelination and stimulate sprouting surviving axons should also help. Most people who have had infarcts or contusion injuries have some axons going through the injury site. Many of these axons may be demyelinated and inadequately remyelinated. That is probably why 4-aminopyridine helps you. Sprouting of the surviving axons should help because they will make the remaining axons have bigger effects.

    Ultimately, however, you should benefit from regeneration therapies. In ChinaSCINet, we chose to test umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells because they have been reported by many laboratories to improve recovery of function animals when transplanted as late as a week after injury. It is true that these experiments were not chronic spinal cord injury. However, they are not acute injuries either. I don't think that they are protecting the spinal cord. Rather, I hope that they are aiding repair and regeneration.

    Lithium stimulates neural stem cells to grow and axons to regrow in animal studies. It also increased neurotrophin production in the spinal cord transplanted with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells. Therefore, we are hoping that the combination of the two therapies will be beneficial in chronic spinal cord injury. Our phase II trials have given us sufficient reason, in my opinion, to go ahead with Phase III trials. If the phase III trials indicates that umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells with or without lithium are ineffective, we will say that it doesn't help and go on to other therapies.

    If the umbilical cord blood and lithium combination therapy stimulates regeneration and improves function, it should be beneficial for ischemic infarcts, transverse myelitis, and other inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord. We hope that others will start testing the therapy in more clinical trials of people with different types of injuries.

    Wise.

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by alan View Post
    Along with the ongoing increases in pains over time, my arms have gotten weaker, and harder to control, and sensation in them changes (right arm faster than left.) The extreme pain in my upper back, along with my sticking shoulder blades, play a role. The neurosurgeons see no tethering on the MRIs, but definite changes in the injured area between 2001 and 2010/11.

    My typing ability is going down the tubes.
    Alan,

    I just came back from China and have been reviewing data from the Kunming group. Over the years, they have done over 300 untethering surgeries of the spinal cord and I hope that we can get that study published. What you describe sounds very much like tethering of the spinal cord. I also know from having observed cases of chronic spinal cord injury that MRI's often cannot show tethering. They have one case of a woman who had a very severe spinal cord injury and nothing improved her recovery for two years until they did an untethering surgery. Now, her pain is mostly gone and she is recovering motor function.

    Wise.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by fourwhlhntr View Post
    Dr. Silver and Dr. Young: I am extremely interested in seeing each of your's reply to Sue Pendleton's question above (post #63).
    I too had no traumatic injury. Neurologist at University of Texas Medical Center in Dallas told me, in 1997, that a blood vessel had hemorrhaged in the spinal cord. He explained that the resulting inflammation had damaged the cord. I am T10, have not rergaind any sensory and no practical motor (able to move left leg and foot slightly). As Sue said, I would like to know which treatment to support.........thank you, Fred
    hi, fourwhlhntr, please see my post to Sue Pendleton. If they show beneficial effects, I believe that the trials in which we are now testing in traumatic spinal cord injury should be relevant to transverse myelitis, ischemia, hemorrhagic, and other causes of non-traumatic spinal cord injury. Wise.

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    I just came back from China and have been reviewing data from the Kunming group. Over the years, they have done over 300 untethering surgeries of the spinal cord and I hope that we can get that study published. What you describe sounds very much like tethering of the spinal cord. I also know from having observed cases of chronic spinal cord injury that MRI's often cannot show tethering. They have one case of a woman who had a very severe spinal cord injury and nothing improved her recovery for two years until they did an untethering surgery. Now, her pain is mostly gone and she is recovering motor function.

    Wise.
    Wise, appoligies for crossing over forums, but I just had a query regarding the reduced pain following untethering surgery in your response above. Firstly, I assume you're referring to neuropathic (central) pain. I'm a T10 complete from a trauma 6 year ago and suffer pretty bad NP. I've tried all of the typical medications and the only relief I'm getting at the moment is Fentynal patches. I while ago I had an MRI for a trial stimulator implant (which was unsuccessful), and the MRI showed a small cavity which at first was thought to be a syrinx, but my original surgeon reviewed it and convinced me it that the cavity was present immediately following my injury. My question is, if the MRI doesn't necessarily detect tethering, is there anything we can do to determine if the untethering procedure is likely to help with NP apart from the trial and error of surgery itself.

    Thanks,
    Clayton
    "Wheelie Wanna Walk!"

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-30-2007, 02:14 PM
  2. Replies: 45
    Last Post: 10-17-2006, 07:14 AM
  3. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-11-2005, 11:53 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-21-2002, 08:54 AM
  5. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-24-2001, 07:28 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •