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Thread: Schroeder, et al. (2003). Androgen therapy improves muscle mass and strength but not muscle quality: results from two studies.

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    Schroeder, et al. (2003). Androgen therapy improves muscle mass and strength but not muscle quality: results from two studies.

    • Schroeder ET, Terk M and Sattler FR (2003). Androgen therapy improves muscle mass and strength but not muscle quality: results from two studies. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 285:E16-24. Summary: The relationship of strength to muscle area was used to assess change in muscle quality after anabolic interventions. Study 1: asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-positive men (39 +/- 9 yr) were randomized to nandrolone (600 mg/wk) +/- resistance training (RT). Study 2: older healthy men (72 +/- 5 yr) were randomized to oxandrolone (20 mg/day) or placebo. Maximum voluntary strength was determined by the 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) method for leg press, flexion and extension, and cross-sectional area of leg muscles by MRI. From study week 0 to study week 12, muscle quality was unchanged with nandrolone, oxandrolone, or oxandrolone placebo, respectively, for total thigh muscles (1.23 +/- 0.012 vs. 1.27 +/- 0.29 kg/cm2; 9.0 +/- 1.1 vs. 8.9 +/- 1.2 N/cm2; 8.9 +/- 1.2 vs. 8.9 +/- 1.9 N/cm2) and hamstrings (0.41 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.43 +/- 0.07 kg/cm2; 0.90 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.95 +/- 0.016 N/cm2; 0.94 +/- 0.23 vs. 0.93 +/- 0.21 N/cm2). Lower-extremity 1-RM strength increased several times greater with RT+nandrolone (51-63% increases) than with nandrolone alone (4.7-16%), despite similar increases in muscle area; therefore, muscle quality increased from 1.13 +/- 0.17 to 1.51 +/- 0.18 kg/cm2 (+36 +/- 19%; P < 0.001) for total thigh muscle, 0.37 +/- 0.10 to 0.53 +/- 0.08 kg/cm2 [+49 +/- 39%; P < 0.001) for hamstrings, and 0.73 +/- 0.19 to 1.07 +/- 0.16 kg/cm2 [+55 +/- 36%; P < 0.001) for quadriceps. Thus androgen therapy alone did not improve muscle quality, but the addition of RT to nandrolone produced substantive improvements. Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 90033, USA.

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    I was wondering if using Anabolic Steroids for a person with a high cervical incomplete injury would help increase muscle strength and muscle mass. More importantly, would it harm them. Also, I have heard of using glutamine and protein to help build muscle too. Are they harmful to a spinal cord patient? Thanks in advance for your time!

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