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Thread: How to recover from a spinal cord injury?

  1. #1

    How to recover from a spinal cord injury?

    I'm writing a story and I would like to know Is it possible to recover from a spinal cord injury?.
    I know it may vary from person to person and injury to injury, but how long does it take to recover (if at all)? How often does someone have to have therapy, for how long, and how much would the therapists have to push that person? And just in case you people were wondering, In my story, a girl of age 15 becomes paralyzed in an accident. How would she be able to cope if she had to live the rest of her life in a wheelchair? And please, if all you are going to say to me is "Why on earth would you write a story about that," or "That's terrible," don't reply to my question. I'm ninteen and I'm writing this story for all of those people who do have to live their lives in wheelchairs. Throughout my story, I want her to become stronger and be able to walk again. I want to give all those people hope and courage so that they lives their lives to the fullest they can. Oh, and I have done some research on the topic, but would like someone with personal or observatory experience to help me out. Thanks.

  2. #2
    There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury. After a spinal cord injury, and intensive inpatient rehabilitation program with therapy (PT, OT, TR, etc.) and counseling and educational services, as well as inpatient rehabilitation nursing is needed. Therapy with PT and OT and sometimes SP will be at least 3 hours daily, 7 days/week. Generally this lasts 6-10 weeks depending on the level of the injury, and then continues at a less intensive level as an outpatient. Unless this girl in your story has a very incomplete spinal cord injury, she is very unlikely to be walking any time. It would take at least 2 years to know what amount of return of function, if any, she would have.

    Personally, I think you should stick to writing about something that you actually know about and have personally experienced. It is extremely presumptous for an able-bodied person to think that they can tell anyone with a SCI or other disability how to have "hope and courage". People with SCI do have a lot to teach you about having hope and courage and leading full lives, not the other way around.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    "I'm ninteen and I'm writing this story for all of those people who do have to live their lives in wheelchairs. Throughout my story, I want her to become stronger and be able to walk again. I want to give all those people hope and courage so that they lives their lives to the fullest they can. Oh, and I have done some research on the topic".......

    research, smesearch!
    as nurse said,, as a non sci, and not even dealing with a sci friend /relative..your going into grounds you have NO idea about.....your fictitious
    story of a girl who walks again will do NOTHING for us with sci !! this is not something u can make up a story about and think it will help us...good intentions, but leave it alone.....

  4. #4
    I agree, good intentions, but leave it alone.
    If you would like, go spend some time volunteering in a rehab hospital.

  5. #5
    Senior Member djrolling's Avatar
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    You may have good intentions but your questions show you have done little if any research and your story will do nothing for people in wheelchairs. We are not inspired by fiction.... We deal with facts. It is nice of you to want to do something but this is not it...

  6. #6
    All of the hard work in the universe will not turn me into an ab. Some of the hardest working, most determined people I know cannot move as much as a pinky.

    You cannot motivate us. A happy, sappy, drippy tale of a girl working so hard she overcomes the odds and is no longer paralyzed will piss us off. Hard work does not undo the damage done to the neuro self.

    Write what you know, about a 19 year old girl who wants to encourage others, does not know how and decides to write about her own life, about what she knows, what she needs to learn.

    The best writing teacher is life experience. Get some.

  7. #7
    Senior Member rdf's Avatar
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    Please donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org.
    Copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

    Thanks!

  8. #8
    Senior Member khmorgan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Personally, I think you should stick to writing about something that you actually know about and have personally experienced. It is extremely presumptous for an able-bodied person to think that they can tell anyone with a SCI or other disability how to have "hope and courage". People with SCI do have a lot to teach you about having hope and courage and leading full lives, not the other way around.
    (KLD)
    I'm not sure that I agree. caron19 wants to write a story about SCI, if she's a good writer she might be able to tell the story of a SCI in a way that touches people. Probably better than many of us non-writer SCIs.

    However, caron19 should definitely not make up the story she tells. She should find someone close to her own age who has an SCI and tell his/her story from their point of view. She may not write a bestseller, but I'll bet it will be interesting, and I'll bet she learns a lot..

    Does anyone remember the movie: "The Other Side of the Mountain" made from the book "A Long Way Up" by E.G. Valens? It was about the Olympic skier Jill Kinmont.

    PS. I'll bet that in the end the title character doesn't walk off into the sunset. Jill Kinmont didn't. And if the truth about people SCIs doesn't interest caron19, she might be better off writing children's books.
    Last edited by khmorgan; 06-07-2010 at 02:17 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member sorefm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdf View Post






    Oh my god.

  10. #10
    Call me skeptical, but Caron's AB status doesn't necessarily mean the story can't be good.

    Caron, I would suggest contacting local hospitals and trying to connect with an injured person in a similar age group. The only way for your character to walk by the end is for clinical trials to begin and science to advance a bit further. (The latter can be helped by the former.)

    If you're willing to put in the time needed to understand the research, you could produce a story with a plausible scientific solution that could open the eyes of doubters and pessimists to a very realistic vision of the future.

    The primary component would be a clinical trial network that can iterate scientifically-informed therapy candidates quickly—keeping what works, dropping what doesn't. This network would accelerate the time that therapies can be brought to fruition, ultimately helping us. (SCINetUSA is a perfect example.)

    Good luck!

    Steven
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

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