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Thread: Edumicating wee ones

  1. #11
    Just talk with him in other languages as you would in English.

    My nieces had languages added each year in larger concentration/depth. The progression has been Spanish, French, Mandarin. The older is of an age where she speaks, writes and reads in each enough to have a conversation beyond, "Where is the bathroom?" Fluency in certain languages takes a lifetime.

    Music can be an adjunct to speaking another language with your nephew. Babies are quite musical and often respond well to it.

    You and your nephew will have fun.

    BTW, what's wrong with being called, "Haha"?

  2. #12
    Senior Member canuck's Avatar
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    How about Klingon? Or medical terminology you know useful stuff

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Edwards View Post
    I'll ask him questions like 母はどこですか? and hope he starts to learn it. (I guess I should ask the mom if she'd object to being called "haha" first.) Should I stick with simple sentences?
    The ordinary verbs and nouns will be enough to keep him busy, once your nephew starts speaking. A world of everyday items and actions to learn. Fun fun. "Sore wa nan desu ka?" The challenge is to fully incorporate language into daily life for your nephew, especially if other family members have different levels of fluency in these languages. If you're already familiar with a second, third or fourth language, those would be great place to start, but it's important to have a plan for extended/expanded studies in that language.

    Otherwise, the outcomes may be similar to Dr. d'Armond Speers, who taught his son fluent Klingon for the first few years of his son's life. It was a great exercise, but the son eventually got bored, probably because few other people were fluent in that language.

    I question the value in activities like learning to count from one to ten or saying 'thank you' in a particular language. I can count my fingers in Finnish, but besides that and occasional 'paljon kiitoksia', it's been pretty much useless. But in our times, true multilingualism is the way to go and the younger kids get started, the easier it is to assimilate those language skills.
    Daniel

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by LaMemChose View Post
    Just talk with him in other languages as you would in English.
    I haven't ever really spoken to babies, other than the occasional "Hi!" in public.

    My nieces had languages added each year in larger concentration/depth. The progression has been Spanish, French, Mandarin. The older is of an age where she speaks, writes and reads in each enough to have a conversation beyond, "Where is the bathroom?" Fluency in certain languages takes a lifetime.
    That's awesome! I know no Mandarin other than "Ni Hao (Kai-Lan)" , so I may substitute Japanese for that.

    Music can be an adjunct to speaking another language with your nephew. Babies are quite musical and often respond well to it.
    Good suggestion! I'll need to find some kid songs in other languages.

    BTW, what's wrong with being called, "Haha"?
    Just sayin'. Father is Chichi (父).

    Quote Originally Posted by canuck View Post
    How about Klingon?
    The best thing about Klingon culture belongs in a separate forum.

    That, and I don't know Klingon. Na'vi may be more appropriate for today's youth, anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc View Post
    The ordinary verbs and nouns will be enough to keep him busy, once your nephew starts speaking. A world of everyday items and actions to learn. Fun fun. "Sore wa nan desu ka?"
    That's a terrific idea, thanks!

    The challenge is to fully incorporate language into daily life for your nephew, especially if other family members have different levels of fluency in these languages. If you're already familiar with a second, third or fourth language, those would be great place to start, but it's important to have a plan for extended/expanded studies in that language.
    Any suggestions? I found a book on raising kids to be bilingual and plan to read it this weekend for tips.

    Otherwise, the outcomes may be similar to Dr. d'Armond Speers, who taught his son fluent Klingon for the first few years of his son's life. It was a great exercise, but the son eventually got bored, probably because few other people were fluent in that language.
    Hopefully the availability of material in Japanese/Spanish/whatever will sidestep that problem. The lack of Klingon kid shows probably contributed to his son's disinterest.

    BTW, do you know of any Dora-like shows I can get that teaches Japanese language and culture?

    I question the value in activities like learning to count from one to ten or saying 'thank you' in a particular language. I can count my fingers in Finnish, but besides that and occasional 'paljon kiitoksia', it's been pretty much useless. But in our times, true multilingualism is the way to go and the younger kids get started, the easier it is to assimilate those language skills.
    Noted and appreciated. I hope to teach more than 一, 二, 三, 四, 五, 六, etc.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Edwards View Post
    Any suggestions? I found a book on raising kids to be bilingual and plan to read it this weekend for tips.
    My DS and BIL had their first child this year also (I'm a proud uncle). They do the immersion thing with Mandarin and Taiwanese for now and plan on sending my niece to a Chinese language-preschool in a few years. From what I find, there is an extreme amount of content avaliable for childrens language education, much of the material developed the Taiwanese govt's education branch. That seems to be their strategy for now. We play that pointing game quite a bit.
    Daniel

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Edwards View Post
    I haven't ever really spoken to babies, other than the occasional "Hi!" in public.
    I'm bad enough with English. The 2.5 years of Spanish I had in high school are all but gone now.

    As far as speaking to the kid, it somewhat comes to you. Newborns to a few months are content to lay in your lap and sleep. I have found that if you don't start this early on, the child may be a little shy to some interactions later in life. Such as taking rides or sitting on your lap and reading or playing.
    C2/3 quad since February 20, 1985.

  7. #17
    I'll be leaving shortly. They just induced her.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  8. #18
    How exciting! Looking forward to pics of the new baby.

  9. #19
    Congrats Steven!

    On the language thing... just speak to the wee one in whatever language(s) you use, as soon as she/he comes into this world. They absorb everything, even when you don't think they are. The can distinguish languages and their specific sounds very acutely, even before they can speak, and much better than when older.

    My niece, just having turned 2, is already learning 3 languages. I think communicating (communication = language + behavior/action/relationships) with her in 3 different languages from birth has really developed and accelerated her language skills and comprehension. She's quick to understand and conceptualize, including abstract concepts, that can sometimes just amaze and throw us for a loop, but can also just be funny and cute as hell.
    Last edited by chick; 06-14-2010 at 05:40 PM.

  10. #20
    Congrats Steven. I hope everyone is enjoying the new baby. Start teaching right away by singing to the baby. Nice thing about babies, they don't even care if you sound that good. lol I've taught all of mine to appreciate good music, and no, they do not like to hear me sing anymore.....

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